Top Stories

Jason Moon for NHPR

N.H. Artists, Elected Officials Call for Protection of Federal Arts Funding

Artists, business owners, and elected officials gathered in Concord today to protest President Donald Trump’s plan to cut federal funding for the arts. Under the president’s proposed budget, the National Endowment for the Arts would be eliminated.

Read More

Special Series on N.H.'s Economy

Transgender: Exploring Gender Identity

13 minutes ago
Wikimedia Commons

Many people struggle with basic questions about gender and labels, including the concept of a transgender identity. While debate around recent legislation has brought the issue into the spotlight, social media and the internet have played a key role in shifting the culture's perspective on gender for several years.

On this edition of The Exchange, we'll look at the terms, the biology, and the emotional aspects of gender identity.


The state of New Hampshire is as much an idea as it is a place. New Hampshire represents the idea of living simply, close to nature, and, of course, freely. In the early 1930s, the state began marketing itself as a kind of Yankee paradise with a magazine called The New Hampshire Troubadour. This magazine, long out of print, may be responsible for the way people outside New Hampshire think about it.

Carsey School of Public Policy

New research from the Carsey School of Public Policy at UNH shows the number of part-time employees who want to be working full-time has still not returned to pre-recession levels.

While the overall unemployment number is back to pre-recession levels, the percentage of workers who are part time but would like to be full-time remains higher than before the great recession.

Rebecca Glauber, author of the study, says the findings are an important asterisk to the overall unemployment rate.

Manchester Police Department

  Several New Hampshire officers are being credited with saving a man's life by performing CPR on him in the police department's front lobby.

The Manchester officers noticed the 51-year-old man sitting in the front lobby seemed pale Tuesday and looked as though he may be sleeping. They weren't able to get a pulse, so they started CPR.

An officer retrieved a defibrillator as others assisted with chest compressions. An ambulance arrived a short time later and took the man to a hospital, where he was treated for a possible heart issue.

Courtesy of Bankrate.com

New Hampshire is the best state in the country in which to retire. That’s according to the financial website Bankrate.com.

Its new report gave New Hampshire high marks for overall well-being, crime and healthcare quality and tax structure.

New research from UNH shows close to half of New Hampshire residents think scientists alter their findings to get the answers they want. That’s raising concerns about whether the public will trust advice from public health experts.

The survey from the Carsey School of Public Policy asked New Hampshire residents about the threat posed by the mosquito-borne Zika virus.

WoodleyWonderWorks; Flickr

Once described as " word blindness," dyslexia affects a person's ability to read accurately and fluently. It's surprisingly common, but early screening and intervention can make a major difference.  

Now, a new state law requires school districts to do just that, but funding for a reading specialist in the N.H. Department of Education -- as required under the law to oversee the state's efforts on dyslexia -- was not included in either the Governor's or the House budget.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Ohio Gov. John Kasich is returning to New Hampshire in April to promote his new book on the road ahead for America.

A Kasich spokesman says the governor will speak at Saint Anselm College on April 27, two days after "Two Paths: America Divided or United" is published.

Kasich took second place in the Republicans' 2016 New Hampshire presidential primary and became a strong critic of Republican President Donald Trump. His return to New Hampshire makes him the first major Republican to visit the key primary state following the November election.

Michael Brindley

  The shortage of women pursuing careers in fields like science and engineering continues to be a challenge companies here in the Granite State and across the country.

A study last year found that nationwide, women account for roughly half of the college-educated workforce, but less than a third of those working in science and engineering.

There’s an effort to change that trend in New Hampshire by introducing young women to those fields early on.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The factory floor inside of Graphicast, a manufacturing company in Jaffrey, feels like a throwback to another era. Workers stand around waist-high crucibles, plucking casts out of the pots filled with bubbling liquid metal.

“We’re melting at about 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit,” says Val Zanchuck, the company’s CEO, over the din. 

Pages

What Could Happen to Federal Funding for Public Media?

The news you need, straight to your inbox

Sign up for NHPR's email newsletters and we'll email you the news you need to know.

Civics 101 Podcast

Your podcast guide to what you need to know, when it matters most

10-Minute Writer's Workshop Podcast

Digging into the secrets of the creative process, one wildly talented person at a time.

Follow NHPR on Twitter

NHPR Program

New Hampshire's only statewide news call-in program. Join the conversation at 1-800-892-6477 or exchange@nhpr.org.

NHPR Program