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State Medical Examiner: 414 People Died of Drug Overdose in 2015

As state officials feared, drug overdose deaths rose significantly in New Hampshire last year, to well over 400 cases. The latest data from the state's medical examiner show that 414 people suffered fatal overdoses in 2015, up from 326 in 2014 and 192 the year before.
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A federal bill that provides money for addiction treatment and drug prevention has passed its first hurdle. Senators Kelly Ayotte and Jeanne Shaheen co-sponsored the legislation. 

The bill calls for additional dollars for a number of areas including treatment for people battling addiction while in prison, drug prevention efforts in schools, and expanding access to the overdose reversal drug Narcan.

On Thursday, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee passed the measure by a unanimous vote. But how much of the bill’s $70 million would go to New Hampshire is unknown.

AP

New Hampshire is one step closer to complying with a federal identification law known as Real ID. That’s after the House Thursday overwhelmingly passed a bill making it optional for people to get Real ID licenses. 

Jim Cole/AP

In the months leading up to Tuesday’s primary, nearly every presidential candidate mentioned New Hampshire’s opioid and heroin epidemic while on the stump in the Granite State.

But now that the New Hampshire primary has come and gone - will this issue be forgotten on the campaign trail as candidates' shift focus to other states?

How did the drug issue became a talking point on the 2016 trail?

Jim Cole/AP

CONCORD, N.H. — A New Hampshire prosecutor has dropped threatening and other charges against the man accused of kidnapping and raping a teenage girl over the course of nine months.

Rik Stevens for NHPR

  DURHAM, N.H. — The huge Carly Fiorina signs along New Hampshire's Route 4 weren't enough to keep her campaign alive past Tuesday's presidential primary, but they could end up helping people with disabilities live their lives more independently.

As state officials feared, drug overdose deaths rose significantly in New Hampshire last year, to well over 400 cases.

The latest data from the state's medical examiner show that 414 people suffered fatal overdoses in 2015, up from 326 in 2014 and 192 the year before.

Woodley Wonderworks via Flickr CC

  Lawmakers in Concord yesterday killed a bill that would provide money for full-day kindergarten programs in the state. The vote of 157-200 was along party lines.

Currently, the state provides adequacy funding for half-day kindergarten programs only. While the bill would not have required districts to offer full-day programs, it would have provided additional state dollars to those districts that already provide them.

Sponsors of the bill argue the state should fund kindergarten at the same level as other grades.

Opponents of the bill cited cost.

The polls had it right when it came to New Hampshire’s presidential primary results—for the most part, anyway. With just a few exceptions, the polls predicted that Donald Trump would win on the Republican side, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders would beat former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a wide margin.

But, historically the polls in New Hampshire haven’t been this accurate. So, what accounts for this increased accuracy? For an answer to that question, we turn to Steve Koczela, President of the MassINC Polling Group. 

A New Hampshire city has voted to ban the use of electronic cigarettes where regular cigarettes are already prohibited.

Foster's Daily Democrat reports the Dover City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to ban e-cigarettes in all locations where tobacco products are banned.

Tobacco products are currently banned from several places around the city including a park and on school grounds and athletic fields.

Advocates of the measure say it will eliminate the "negative influence" that e-cigarettes have on children.

File photo

A New Hampshire hospital is working to revaccinate hundreds of children after discovering that its vaccines were stored at inconsistent temperatures.

State public health officials have said the affected vaccines from Alice Peck Day Memorial Hospital in Lebanon aren't harmful but might have lost some potency. That means they could provide less immunity to disease.

The problem occurred over the course of 14 months, from September 2014 to October 2015. The hospital offered to revaccinate 827 patients at no cost to them or their insurance companies.

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