Top Stories

In Philadelphia, Sanders' N.H. Supporters Say Progressive Movement Lives On

Senator Bernie Sanders closed out the first night of the Democratic National Convention with a prime-time speech where he urged his supporters to carry on the campaign’s legacy while also uniting around Hillary Clinton.
Read More

NHPR's Summer Car Raffle is Back!

Buy tickets now and you'll be entered to win!

Courtesy Bob Doran via Flickr/Creative Commons

At 19 years old, I am certainly a product of the digital age. All of my school writing pieces, from simple grammar assignments in elementary school to research papers at college, have been created, edited, and finished off on various computers. I can honestly say that I have never used a typewriter. In fact, I’m not entirely sure where I would find one, should I want to recreate the atmosphere of a 1980s newsroom that Robbie Hoenig evoked in her report about UNH’s purchase of new computers for their writing lab in 1987.

Ask around long enough on the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, and you’ll find plenty of critiques about New Hampshire’s place in the presidential nominating contest.

“It makes no sense that it is a decider for so many candidates when it really isn’t reflective of the population in the rest of the states,” said one delegate from Texas.

“You know, I think it sets the pace a little badly and it stretches the whole primary system,” another, from American Samoa, said.

At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Wednesday night, a retired Navy rear admiral with New Hampshire ties described Donald Trump as too erratic to lead the nation’s military.

John Hutson, who served as dean of the UNH School of Law for a decade, criticized the Republican nominee for endorsing torture and for proposals he says would require U.S. troops to commit war crimes.

“This very morning, he personally invited Russia to hack us,” Hutson said. “That’s not law and order; that’s criminal intent.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senator Martha Fuller Clark was the only one of New Hampshire's eight superdelegates to support Sen. Bernie Sanders.

That's despite Sanders' 22-point victory in in the state in February. 

She cast her vote during Tuesday night's roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

But now that Hillary Clinton is officially the Democratic nominee and Sanders has endorsed her, Fuller Clark says it's time for all Democrats to rally behind the former Secretary of State.

Back in February, Bernie Sanders beat Hillary Clinton by 22 points in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary.

But in the end, when the roll call took place on the floor of the Democratic National Convention Tuesday night, the Granite State was a tie: Its 32 delegates to the convention ended up splitting evenly between Sanders and Clinton.

In years past, New Hampshire’s Democratic delegates have united around the nominee. The morning of the roll call, the Sanders delegates huddled for more than an hour to decide how they would vote.

David J. Murray, Cleareyephoto.com

Anyone who's ever been an awkward adolescent knows that for decades now, dog-eared copies of Judy Blume's books have been passed around school playgrounds like secrets, or read under the covers after lights out. Her best known books - Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret, Deenie, Blubber, and Forever - offered young readers plain language and shame -free stories about periods, bullying, sexual urges and, even 'going all the way'.

Mary RN / Morguefile

Astrid Silva came to the United States as an undocumented Mexican immigrant and she spoke last night at the Democratic Convention in favor of Hillary Clinton. She said, “I know she will fight to keep our families together. Nuestras familias. I know she will.”

Joining NHPR’s Peter Biello today to discuss issues of immigration in New Hampshire is Alejandro Urrutia, a doctor originally from Mexico.

Epa.gov

Residential water sources near a Superfund site on the Seacoast have tested below the state’s standard for perfluorichemicals - including PFOA. Earlier tests at the site showed PFCs at levels significantly higher than the state standard.

Sixteen residential wells near the former Coakley landfill were tested for perfluorichemicals following the discovery of those contaminants in monitoring wells at the landfill earlier this year. All of the residential wells tested showed PFC levels below the recently established state standard.

Bruce Marlin / Creative Commons

It’s an almost magical aspect of summer nights in New Hampshire: the sight of fireflies glowing in the darkness, hoping to attract mates. Granite Geek David Brooks recently began to worry about the population of fireflies. It seemed to him like there were fewer of them. So like any good journalist, he went to an expert to gain insight on this observation, and he joins me now to talk about what he found. David’s here now. Welcome.

Pages

The news you need, straight to your inbox

Sign up for our email newsletters and have the news come to you every Monday and Friday morning.

Hope on the Front Lines

Meet the people working to make a difference in N.H.'s growing opioid crisis

New Program

Special Series

Follow NHPR on Twitter

NHPR's Elections Database

The N.H. Elections Database

Town-level data from 1972 to present

10-Minute Writer's Workshop

NHPR Program

New Hampshire's only statewide news call-in program. Join the conversation at 1-800-892-6477 or exchange@nhpr.org.

NHPR Program

The sound of new ideas, under-reported stories, and hidden gems from below the fold. Hosted by Virginia Prescott.

NHPR Blog

News, analysis, infographics, insights, and more