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Law enforcement officials are searching the former home of a New Hampshire woman who went missing more than 35 years ago.

Denise Beaudin was last seen in November of 1981. Law enforcement officials recently announced a renewed criminal investigation after receiving new information about the fate of the then 23-year-old woman.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

  More than two thousand patients are receiving medical marijuana in New Hampshire, including a handful of children and teenagers.

That's according to new numbers released by state health officials last week. The state legalization medical marijuana in 2013, but only began dispensing it last spring.

According to the report, the youngest qualifying patient is two years old, and the oldest is 98.

Daniel S. Hurd

 

Fierce debate is expected over a bill that would require sexual assault victims to corroborate their testimony if the defendant has no prior related convictions.

Lawmakers will hold a hearing Tuesday on the bill. Existing law doesn't require a victim to corroborate their testimony. Another bill before the committee would change the word "victim" to "complainant" in the sexual assault statute.

Domestic violence advocacy groups oppose both bills. Prosecutors, police and victims are expected to testify against the bill.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

  New Hampshire Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter has joined a growing number of Democratic lawmakers who say they plan to skip Donald Trump's inauguration.

In a tweet Monday night, Shea-Porter said instead of attending Friday's ceremonies, she'll attend religious services to "pray for all of our leaders and people."

As President-Elect Donald Trump's inauguration approaches this weekend, Washington is bracing itself for “hundreds of thousands” of inaugural attendees and protestors – a crowd that will likely include more than a few Granite Staters.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

For 35 years, the Martin Luther King Coalition has hosted a celebration of the late civil rights leader’s birthday in Manchester. Some at this year’s event said now more than ever - King’s Legacy must not be forgotten.

Early in her invocation, Meriden’s United Church of Christ Reverend, Gail Kinney, zeroed in on current events.

Peter Biello / NHPR

  The New Hampshire Food Bank has a new Executive Director. Eileen Groll Liponis of Brentwood spent more than two decades in the business and nonprofit world, including nine years at the helm of the New Hampshire Public Charter School Association. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the need for food assistance among Granite State residents.

  For listeners who aren’t familiar with the Food Bank and how it operates, explain how the Food Bank gets donated food to people who need it.

One bill would allow hepatitis C patients to use marijuana even if they're not receiving antiviral treatment; another would allow doctors to prescribe marijuana to patient suffering “severe pain” that hasn’t responded to medication, surgery, or for which other treatments produced serious side effects; a third measure would allow medical marijuana to be used in facilities for people with developmental disabilities or mental illness.

The bills cleared a senate committee on unanimous votes and are expected to pass.

Updated on Jan. 13, 2017 at 5:07 PM:

Visiting hours will return to normal on Saturday at the state prison for men. Inmate visits were halted earlier this week after a series of likely drug overdoses left one man dead.

In the meantime, the department says it is investigating the type, source, and entry point of the drugs that caused the following three incidents.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Over the summer, Nashua aldermen voted to make Nashua a sister city with Mysore, India - a city 100 miles southwest of Bangalore.

Now, a local Rotary Club is sending a group of four Americans there.  

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

Lawmakers have decided that, for the time being, New Hampshire will only be accepting a portion of a federal grant intended to help the state Medical Examiner work through a backlog of opioid-related autopsies. 

Attorney General Joseph Foster met with resistance during Friday’s fiscal committee meeting in Concord when he requested that the state accept approximately $285,000 in federal grant money to aid the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

Current Population Survey, © 2016 by Barry T. Hirsch and David A. Macpherson

New Hampshire lawmakers are again debating Right-to-Work laws, with bills currently moving through both the House and Senate. With Republican majorities in both chambers, and a newly-elected governor who favors Right-to-Work, the policy stands its best chance of passing in more than a decade.

But Right-to-Work isn’t exactly a kitchen-table kind of issue. If you aren’t in a union, or a large business owner, you may not know much about its history, what Right-to-Work does, or why it matters.

Courtesy

It’s been a busy week in Washington, D.C. Lawmakers have heard from some of President-elect Donald Trump’s nominees for his Cabinet and they’ve also taken steps to dismantle the Affordable Care Act. As a member of the Senate Foreign Relations and the Armed Services Committees, New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen had the opportunity to question two of Trump’s nominees—Rex Tillerson for Secretary of State and James Mattis for Secretary of Defense—and she joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about those hearings and other news of the week.

Via the Manchester School District website / mansd.org

Some call it the toughest job in the state of New Hampshire: superintendent of the Manchester School District. To know why, it helps to understand just how different the district is from most in the state.

We hope you're getting settled back into the swing of things post-holidays. Across New Hampshire, your neighbors and elected officials are wasting no time supplying a full spread of headlines from the Statehouse and beyond. Keep scrolling to catch up on some of the most interesting stuff that caught our eyes this week. And don't forget to sign up for NHPR's newsletters to get this and other updates delivered right to your inbox each week.

josh rogers/nhpr

Senator Maggie Hassan is urging local care providers to fight for President Obama's signature health law.

Hassan used a visit to a Concord community mental health center to urge local care providers to lend their voices to what she termed the battle over Obamacare, which Washington Republicans have begun repealing. The law has helped 63,000 people in New Hampshire obtain coverage.

Daniel S. Hurd via Flickr CC

 

  New Hampshire's chief accountant is resigning three years before his term ends, giving Republican Gov. Chris Sununu another key appointment in his first term.

Comptroller Gerard Murphy is leaving at the end of January when the state's comprehensive annual financial report is completed. The comptroller handles all statewide financial reporting, including monitoring state revenues, which determine how much money the state has to spend.

Murphy is taking the job of associate vice president for finance at Keene State College.

Cory Doctorow; Flickr

Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What's free speech?  And what's hate speech? What's dissent?  What's a threat?  

This show originally aired on November 29, 2016. 

Courtsy Seabrooke Leckie via Flickr/Creative Commons.

New Hampshire’s Pack Monadnock is one of the best places in the state for hawk watch.

  A federal appeals court has upheld New Hampshire's law allowing buffer zones around abortion clinics that supporters say protect women from harassment.

The state law allowing buffer zones up to 25 feet has been on the books since 2014, but no clinic has established one.

The 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston said in its Wednesday ruling that anti-abortion activists had no standing to challenge the law because with no zones in place, their protests haven't been affected.

Handbook of New Hampshire Elected Officials

A state representative faced a strong rebuke from the Speaker of the House after she dropped her loaded handgun while entering a House Education Committee hearing Thursday.

Milford Republican Carolyn Halstead apologized for the incident, in which her gun fell to the floor, but did not fire. She says it came loose from her waistband while she removed her backpack.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers are close to approving a federal grant to help the state Medical Examiners Office deal with a backlog of autopsies, mostly due to drug overdose deaths. 

NewHampshire.com

For 30 years, folks from all over New England have been celebrating traditional music and dance at the Ralph Page Dance Legacy Weekend.  

Over the new few months, NHPR is bringing you a new way to experience Granite State stories from a whole new angle — literally. With 360-degree videos like this one, we're hoping you'll be able to more closely explore the places, and meet the people, we reporting on.

Cathy Merrill, Facebook

Traditionally, New Hampshire's poet laureate reads a poem at the inauguration of a new governor. This year, however, Gov. Chris Sununu chose someone with a different talent. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury have become the signature ailments among veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The New Hampshire Legislative Commission on PTSD and TBI released a report in 2014 that looked at how many veterans in the state had these injuries and whether they felt they were getting the help they needed.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  U.S Senator Jeanne Shaheen questioned Donald Trump’s pick for defense secretary about NATO during confirmation hearings today.

As a candidate, President–Elect Trump questioned the utility of NATO, but in picking General James Mattis to lead the military, Trump selected a former NATO commander.

Shaheen asked Mattis about Trump’s NATO comments and about a a slated boost in U.S. funding for NATO under an initiative known as ERI.

“Will you support the ERI continuing as secretary of defense?

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Lawmakers and business leaders met with advocates in Bedford on Wednesday to talk about the link between affordable housing and New Hampshire's workforce.

Thomas Gehrke / Flickr Creative Commons

 

In his inaugural address last week, Gov. Chris Sununu made it clear he thinks the state must — and can — act to reduce the state's high cost of electricity.

“We can’t be passive anymore," Sununu said. "We have to find the right solutions to get it done and get it done our way. Do we need to look at Northern Pass? You bet we do — 1,100 megawatts of clean, renewable energy? How do we say no to that when we have the highest rates in the country? We can help ratepayers.”

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

One New Hampshire lawmaker wants to add a new charge to the state’s criminal code: Under his proposal, someone who provides another person with a lethal dose of heroin or fentanyl would be charged with manslaughter

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