News

An increasing number of organ donations in New Hampshire are coming from people who have died of overdoses.

New England Donor Services says in 2016, 92 organ donors had died of a drug overdose. WMUR-TV reports  the percentage of organ donors who were overdose victims rose from 4 percent to 27 percent in a five-year timespan.

About a third of donors are overdose victims in New Hampshire.

jdurham / Morguefile

River Valley Community College, based in Claremont, is launching two new programs in computer science and information technology. The move is an attempt by the college to better tailor its offerings to the needs of local employers. 

"There are actually companies that are very, very concerned about not finding the right talent in the state," said Ali Rafieymehr, interim president and vice president of academic affairs at RVCC.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

In its 94th year, the Laconia Motorcycle Week prides itself on being the world’s oldest motorcycle rally. As the rally ages, however, so too has its main demographic. But health-related organizations are seeing a silver lining in this shift — and are seizing on this new chance to reach aging bikers in their element.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 16, 2017

Jun 16, 2017

N.H. House and Senate negotiators reach a deal on the $11.7 billion budget this week but the spending plan is facing pushback from both sides of the aisle ahead of next week's full vote. At a hearing on the Northern Pass project, opponents show up in force. And bears continue to make news in the Granite State. 


Emily Corwin / NHPR

New Hampshire has joined 36 other states in allowing illicit drug users to exchange used needles for clean ones.

7thsettlement.com

A New Hampshire restaurant is banning tips in favor of raising menu prices, saying it will give its staff a salary of $45,000 to $50,000 a year. Owners of 7th Settlement Brewery in Dover say they will no longer accept tips starting Labor Day.

The restaurant's co-founder, David Boynton, spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the new policy.

Flickr: jonszcz

It was a busy Friday for Governor Chris Sununu, who signed more than three dozen new bills into law.

mtwashingtonautoroad.com

About 1,300 runners will gather in Gorham Saturday morning for what sounds like a relatively easy task: A race with only one hill. The catch? That hill just happens to be the tallest peak on the east coast.

Michael Brindley/NHPR

The fifth and final "Welcome Home" ceremony for Vietnam Veterans will take place Saturday in Hudson. The event is hosted by the New Hampshire National Guard. 

When troops came back from fighting in Vietnam, they weren't universally welcomed. In some cases, they were actually scorned by those who opposed the war.

Now, however, Vietnam veterans are more widely recognized as having served their country honorably. More than a third of New Hampshire's veterans served during the Vietnam era.

biologycorner / Flickr Creative Commons

The SAT scores of 11th graders in New Hampshire are up slightly from last year.

Preliminary data released this week shows New Hampshire’s high school juniors improved their scores in both the math and English portions of the College Board SAT.

Two-thirds met the state’s proficiency benchmark in English, while 44 percent met the benchmark in math.

This is the second year that the SAT has been used as the statewide assessment for 11th graders.

Samantha Fogel

New Hampshire Fish and Game hosted the 30th annual moose hunt lottery this morning. Names were selected from a computer generated system. 51 permits were issued to 6,850 applicants. The odds of getting one of these permits were 1 in 87 for residents of New Hampshire and 1 in 391 for out-of-state applicants.

Among the winners was Richard Tichko from Canterbury. 

"I feel pretty excited. My wife is up in Pittsburgh fly fishing. She said if she won, I had to call her. Well I'm going to call her and tell her I won."

Monika McGillicuddy

 Boston Harbor will host more than 50 tall ships this weekend, bringing thousands of tourists to the area.

But in a break from tradition, there will be no such display of the historic vessels along the Piscataqua River in Portsmouth later this summer.

Organizers of Sail Portsmouth say they’ve had to cancel this year’s tall ships festival due to contractual issues with the event in Boston.

Chad Chadwick is chair of the Piscataqua Maritime Commission, which organizes Sail Portsmouth. He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition.

Courtesy Duncan C via Flickr/Creative Commons.

At Something Wild we like to talk about some of the interesting wildlife or natural occurrences you can find in New Hampshire. We hope you learn a little something wild along the way; sometimes that’s birds and bees, sometimes that’s flowers and trees, but today we want to talk about that thing called love. 

NHPR Staff

When Governor Chris Sununu looked for somebody to replace retiring state supreme court Justice Carol Ann Conboy, he didn’t have to look very far.

His pick, Bobbie Hantz, was, until the day she applied to join the state’s highest court, a member of the selection panel Sununu appointed to help him vet would-be judges.

Chris Jensen

The supervisor of the White Mountain National Forest is stepping down.

Tom Wagner announced this week that he’s retiring at the beginning of September. He’s served in the role for 15 years, overseeing 800,000 acres of forest in New Hampshire and western Maine.

JeffOnWire / Flickr

The Department of Veterans Affairs says a program that offers veterans private-sector health care will run out of money much sooner than expected.

VA Secretary David Shulkin made the disclosure about the Veterans Choice Program Wednesday at a Senate hearing.

He cites a shortfall of more than $1 billion due to increased demand from veterans for care outside the VA, telling Senators that March, April and May have been extra busy for Choice.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Members of the public were given their latest chance to weigh in on Northern Pass, a proposed utility transmission project that would bring hydropower from Quebec to Southern New England via New Hampshire.

Ben Henry

In a plant-filled apartment in Lebanon during the heat wave this week, Helen Brody drank iced tea and recalled the rise and fall of the New Hampshire Farms Network (NHFN). She launched the website in 2008, to nurture local food culture at a time when “local food” was barely a thing.

For the past decade, the NHFN website had been a source of in-depth profiles on New Hampshire farmers and their families. This April, it closed down, although the New Hampshire Historical Society recently made plans to acquire the profiles.

Ian Sane / flickr, creative commons

A bill that advocates say would have improved water quality standards in the state will not become law this session.

The bill would have directed the Department of Environmental Services to conduct a review of the safe drinking water standards for perfluorochemicals.

These industrial chemicals have been found in communities across the state – including near the Saint-Gobain plant in Merrimack and the former Pease Airforce Base in Portsmouth.

Britta Greene / NHPR

What’s notable about Margie Emmons' kayak tours is not necessarily what you can see on the tour, it’s what you can’t.

 

On a recent morning, Emmons led a small group of women on a tour of the Moore Reservoir, just west of Littleton, New Hampshire. Two towns - one on the Vermont side and one in New Hampshire - used to stand in this spot. The remains of both flooded after New England Power built the Moore Dam in the 1950s.

 

Courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Joanne Conroy, a hospital executive in Burlington, Mass., will be the next CEO and president of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Conroy will take over the role in August after the departure of James Weinstein.  

Dartmouth-Hitchcock is the state's largest health system, with about 12,000 employees and 24 clinics in New Hampshire and Vermont. Conroy, an anesthesiologist, will be the first woman to lead the Lebanon-based system.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When Republicans took full control in Concord this year, they wasted no time outlining an ambitious policy agenda on a number of fronts, including education.

While Republicans were able to accomplish much of that agenda, they weren’t able to get everything they wanted. Here’s a rundown of some major developments in education policy so far this year.

Twitter/@akevmac

 It's not old, but it's certainly grand: Manchester has a new "Great Flag" that pays tribute to both veterans and the city's textile manufacturing history.

In 1914, workers at the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company gathered for a photo in front of a 95-by-50-foot American flag they had created. On Wednesday - Flag Day - several hundred members of the public recreated the photo with a new flag unfurled against the former mill building. Some were relatives of the mill workers depicted in the 103-year-old photo.

josh rogers/nhpr

House and Senate negotiators say they have a deal on a two-year state budget that spends less than the $11.8 billion plan passed by the Senate, which trimmed money from than the $11.9 billion proposal backed by House leaders that failed to win approval in April.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Four panelists -- three of them veterans -- answered questions about their personal experiences navigating gender and sexuality issues at a public discussion at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont on Wednesday.

The event was part of a broader effort by the VA to let veterans know they can be honest about their gender and sexuality and still access medical care within the VA system.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Karen Fischer, of Manchester, was at a loss last year trying to find help for her teenage daughter after a suicide attempt. The local hospital didn’t have a pediatric mental health unit, and insurance wouldn’t approve a stay in the regular pediatric unit. As a result, her daughter was stuck in an emergency room hallway for three days, awaiting treatment.

The organ donation system is complex, and often misunderstood -  with a waiting list that is long, and constantly shifting. But living donations, high-risk donors, and new scientific developments in tissue growth are making new strides in addressing the need.


via ianrankin.com

Ian Rankin is best known for two characters: Inspector John Rebus, the protagonist of now 21 mystery novels, and the city of Edinburgh, whose dark corners come alive in Rankin’s hands. Rebus made his debut in the 1987 crime novel Knots & Crosses. In Rankin’s newest novel - Rather Be the Devil - a retired Rebus returns to a case that has haunted him for decades.

Episode music by Podington Bear
Ad music by Uncanny Valleys

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

Hudson Middle School principal Keith Bowen noticed a disturbing trend a couple of years ago.

"A lot of our achievement scores hadn’t changed, despite all our efforts."

Test scores are one thing. But then Bowen noticed more troubling trends.

"We started to hear about the opioid crisis. There were a lot of students who lost a parent, partly because of opioid use, partly due to suicide."

In other words, students were dealing with challenges bigger than algebraic equations.

AR MCLIN / FLICKR

The chief of police of New Hampshire’s largest city is urging people not to give money to panhandlers.

Manchester Police Chief Nick Willard wrote an open letter to the community last week titled "Panhandling - A Community Issue," and it’s stirred a lot of debate.

In the letter, Willard acknowledges panhandlers are within their rights to ask for money, but added that there’s no way to know if they will use it to buy drugs or alcohol.

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