News

 A New Hampshire town that said it wouldn't be decorated with holiday lights this season because of code issues with a utility now has a glimmer of hope.

The Portsmouth Herald reports that Exeter town officials have been talking to Unitil and are looking to get an electrician to install a needed meter and utility pole panel so they can set up their lighted garlands.

Cory Doctorow; Flickr

Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What's free speech?  And what's hate speech? What's dissent?  What's a threat?  


appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

 

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office says the death of a 2½-year-old Berlin girl was a homicide.

State and local police say that Madison Dana was taken to the Androscoggin Valley Hospital from her Berlin home Sunday afternoon after a 911 call. The girl was later pronounced dead.

An autopsy conducted Monday on the body of the girl found she died of blunt impact injuries. The manner of death was ruled a homicide.

The investigation into the circumstances of the girl's death is continuing.

voting booths
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Though there is no evidence behind President-elect Donald Trump’s recent claim of “serious’’ voter fraud in New Hampshire, the state could see a handful of election law changes now that Republicans are in charge at the State House.

Gov.-elect Chris Sununu wants to eliminate Election Day registration, while fellow Republicans in the legislature have long sought a 10- or 30-day residency requirement. They say the changes would give voters more confidence in New Hampshire’s election systems.

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire polling places were under plenty of scrutiny on Election Day.

The attorney general’s office dispatched 50 people to polling locations across the state to keep an eye out for problems. The U.S. Department of Justice had its own Election Day hotline set up to field questions and potential complaints. Officials in the Secretary of State’s office, meanwhile, also kept an eye out for issues.

And, despite what President-Elect Donald Trump tweeted Sunday night, nowhere is there any evidence that large groups of people were voting illegally in New Hampshire.

  In the past year, the number of narcotic painkillers prescribed in New Hampshire decreased by more than 13 percent, while cases of suspected “doctor shopping” by patients dropped by nearly two-thirds.

The new data, presented to Gov. Maggie Hassan and legislative leaders earlier this month, suggest that two years after it was launched, the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program is working as designed.

Reedz Malik; Flickr

On the week of World Aids Day, a look at HIV and AIDS in New Hampshire. New preventative methods and ever-improving treatments mean that more patients are living longer, healthier lives. But many challenges remain, including testing and insurance discrimination.


SAUL LOEB / AP

President-elect Donald Trump is alleging there was quote-serious voter fraud in New Hampshire and other states during the election earlier this month, despite no evidence to back up such a claim.

Trump narrowly lost New Hampshire to Hillary Clinton, though won the election despite losing the overall popular vote.

In a series of tweets Sunday, Trump claimed he would have won the popular vote had it not been for the quote-millions of people who voted illegally.

Trump also claimed there was serious voter fraud in New Hampshire, Virginia, and California.

josh rogers/nhpr

What Plymouth State University is calling the The Raymond S. Burton ’62 Open Laboratory  is a computer-enhanced meeting and study space.

unh.edu

Last week, students, faculty and staff at the University of New Hampshire received an email from UNH president Mark Huddleston condemning a recent spike in incidents of hate speech on campus. NHPR’s Jason Moon visited campus to see how the school community was responding to the letter.

Manchester Fire Department

Back in May, Manchester Fire Chief Dan Goonan extended an open invitation to anyone struggling with an addiction: If someone walked into any of the city's 10 fire stations and asked for help, they would get it.

Since then, the number of people who've taken the city up on that offer has far exceeded the chief's expectations.

The past few months in American life have been hard for Sean Hurley to comprehend. The NHPR reporter was struggling to keep up with changes in how we talk to each other, and act toward each other. Some of those shifts have been subtle, others less so. And then earlier this month, one of his favorite songwriters and poets died, Leonard Cohen, and he really felt like he was losing his way. So he grabbed his microphone and went outside….

Smithsonian's National Zoo via Flickr

We’ve been hearing a lot about porcupines this year. They seem to be everywhere! It’s positively a plague of porcupines!

So why are there so many? Biologists don’t have an official answer, but Dave Anderson has a hypothesis involving coyotes and fisher cats. The porcupine’s only real predator is the fisher. It takes a tough critter to eat a porcupine. Anecdotally, trackers and hunters are reporting that fisher numbers appear to be down this year, so it makes sense that porcupine numbers are up.

Dozens of New Hampshire small businesses will be offering deals this weekend but not for Black Friday -- rather they're celebrating “Plaid Friday.”

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Wentworth-Douglass Hospital

According to a report from the Department of Health and Human Services, last year New Hampshire hospitals had 64 so-called adverse events - preventable accidents that harm patients.

Sean Hurley

For Thanksgiving this year, the NH Food Bank distributed 19,000 turkeys to food pantries and shelters across the state. 200 of these turkeys went to the Plymouth Food Pantry and NHPR’s Sean Hurley stopped by as they were handed out. 

CREDIT KELSEY OHMAN VIA FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The New Hampshire ski season officially kicked off this week with six mountains hoping to start up its lifts for the Thanksgiving weekend.

Surviving the Decline of the New Hampshire Dairy Industry

Nov 23, 2016
Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

  A lot of dairy farmers are born into the business. But Jamie Robinson calls his path "the old fashioned way." He married into it. Roberston and his wife, Heather, are the fourth generation to work Bohanan Farm in Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Their children are already planning to follow suit. But over the years, there have been plenty of opportunities to get out of the business if they wanted to.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

Amid uncertainty about the future of the country’s immigration laws under a Trump administration, Dartmouth is trying to reassure undocumented students that they’re welcome on campus — and that the school will try to protect them from potential changes in the law that might be in store.

New England Readies For Trump’s Refugee Plans

Nov 23, 2016
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President-elect Donald Trump hasn’t elaborated much on immigration policy, beyond what he laid out during the campaign.  But enough has been said that many believe he will limit the number of refugees allowed into the U.S.

Before the election, at numerous campaign events, then candidate Donald Trump made it clear he would not be putting out the welcome mat for refugees from Syria, who now number in the millions.

Note: This story was reported as part of the New England News Collaborative.

Todd Bookman, NHPR

The machinery inside Conner Bottling Works doesn’t sparkle like it used to. In fact, everything and everybody in here look like they could use a break.

“We are the last family-owned independent bottler in the state of New Hampshire,” says Dan Conner, the fifth generation to work here. “153 years, from start to today. Never shut down, never stopped.”

Launched in 1863, the first Conners only bottled beer, but in the 1890s, the company branched out into sodas. During prohibition, harder drinks were made out back, a friendly sheriff reportedly looking the other way.

Flickr cc

The American Red Cross is highlighting a string of house fires in Vermont and New Hampshire this week to warn people to be extra careful as they prepare for the holidays.

Red Cross volunteers responded Monday to fires in Concord, Manchester and Proctor, Vermont. The fires displaced 25 people from eight families. Two more fires Tuesday night — in Rochester, N.H. and White River Junction, Vermont — displaced an additional four people.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

New Hampshire corrections officials are asking state budget writers for nearly 30 million more dollars in the next budget to help pay for an ongoing labor shortage.

FILE

After this month’s elections, Republicans will maintain control of the New Hampshire House of Representatives.

Now House lawmakers must decide who will lead the 400-member chamber come January. The current Speaker Shawn Jasper is hoping to keep his gavel but he faces some challengers within his own party.

Photo Credit Katja Rupp, via Flickr Creative Commons

Lest there’s any confusion as Maine and Massachusetts move to loosen their drug laws, New Hampshire police want to make one thing clear about marijuana use in the Granite State.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Governor-Elect Chris Sununu will officially cut ties with Waterville Valley Ski Resort on Dec. 31 – just a few days before he’s set to officially step into his role as governor.

University of New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire President Mark Huddleston sent a campus-wide email Tuesday condemning what he says has been a recent increase in hate incidents on campus.

NHPR Staff

The Community College System of New Hampshire says it has recovered most of the $130,000 it lost in a wire fraud incident last month.  CCSNH is still out $6,000, according to Community College spokesperson, Shannon Reid. The system was tricked into paying a fake bill by a scammer last month, but was able to reverse the transfer of most of that money. Reid says other colleges have been targeted in similar incidents, and that CCSNH has developed new security practices since the incident occur

Photo Credit Katja Rupp, via Flickr Creative Commons

Marijuana stores and social clubs won't be opening in Portland for at least six months following Maine's recent vote to legalize the drug.

The Portland Press Herald reports the city council unanimously approved a six-month moratorium Monday on the opening of any marijuana businesses. The moratorium will give councilors time to develop regulations around marijuana-related retail businesses.

Maine voters opted on Nov. 8 to legalize marijuana, but municipalities can regulate it. The law allows people 21 and older to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana for recreational use.

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