News

Flikr Creative Commons / Ken_Lord

A Hampton fisherman wants to take his concerns about federal fishing regulations to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Hampton fisherman David Goethel says the federal government shouldn’t be able to force him to pay for his own at-sea monitors. At-sea monitors are regulators who accompany fishermen on some fishing trips to make sure catch limits are being observed.

Amanda Loder, StateImpact New Hampshire

Laurie Laizure of Manchester likes to think she’s the kind of parent who’s engaged in what’s happening at her kids' schools.

Which is why she was so surprised to learn, when scrolling through Facebook last month, about a sexual assault that took place at Manchester West High School. In 2015, a 14-year-old student — a classmate of Laizure's daughter — was raped by an older student in a secluded hallway during school hours.

NHPR Staff

The reviewer overseeing reforms outlined in a lawsuit settlement over mental health care says New Hampshire has made significant advances toward compliance.

Court-appointed monitor Stephen Day cites "the very positive results" in the number of people being treated in the community rather than in hospital emergency departments that have been made possible by mobile crisis teams in Concord and Manchester. Mobile crisis services have helped more people access crisis services, delivered more crisis services, and led to "substantial growth" in people accessing crisis apartments.

Michael Samuels

A small group of New Hampshire veterans will gather in North Haverhill Tuesday to learn about farm equipment and the agricultural industry in the state. 

St. Paul's School

The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office announced Thursday it’s launching a criminal investigation into St. Paul’s School.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Two top officials at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Manchester have been removed pending a review of conditions described in a Boston Globe report. Several doctors at the Manchester VA complained in the report of unsanitary operating rooms and alleged substandard care.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: July 14, 2017

Jul 14, 2017

New Hampshire's Attorney General opens a criminal investigation into charges of sexual assault at St. Paul's School. Governor Chris Sununu signed a number of bills, including full-day kindergarten funding, a drug interdiction bill, and another tightening the definition of domicile for voting purposes. He also vetoed his first bill, regarding zoning board procedures.  And Grover Norquist, of Americans for Tax Reform, visits the state to talk tax reform and support GOP congressional candidates.


NHPR Staff

Governor Sununu's pick to lead a lead a new state department dedicated to economic development had his day before the Executive Council today.

The Governor likes to describe the goal for this new department, which would oversee business development and travel and tourism, as being a "one stop shop" for folks doing business in New Hampshire.

That sounds simple, but it touches areas as diverse as education, housing, and labor policies, all of which can get complicated, as can the business-speak of Sununu's pick to spearhead development efforts, Taylor Caswell.

Over a million dollars is headed to New Hampshire to help protect coastal communities.

Šarūnas Burdulis / https://flic.kr/p/8q4XT1

A large, privately held piece of land in Hanover will be protected under a new agreement between the land's owners and the Hanover Conservancy, a private non-profit conservation group.

The land, just over 300 acres northeast of town, overlaps with the Appalachian Trail and is home to woods, streams and wetlands. Those features, plus its location and high elevation, made it particularly attractive to the Hanover Conservancy.

Eddie Cheuk

The attorney general’s office made waves Thursday night in announcing its plans to launch a criminal investigation into St. Paul’s School over its handling of sexual assaults on school grounds.

While the investigation is still just in its beginning stages, some are already starting to draw parallels to a time when the state took on another powerful institution over its handling of sexual abuse: the Catholic Church.

National Grid is holding a series of ‘community meetings’ to gather input and discuss details of its proposed Granite State Power Link project, which would bring hydropower from Canada through New Hampshire on its way to southern New England.

After meeting with residents in Littleton last week, National Grid is holding public sessions in Monroe on Monday at 6:30 pm inside the Town Hall. On Tuesday, representatives will be in Webster’s Town Hall, starting at 6:30 pm.

Capitol Center for the Arts

It’s been 23 years since the old Concord Theatre on South Main Street closed its doors for good, but there’s a renewed effort to bring it back to life.

The theater opened in 1933, but has sat vacant for years. It’s likely many who pass by the building are unaware of the history inside.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Since 1847, the Exeter Brass Band has been filling the air with horns and cymbal crashes.

The New Hampshire ensemble is one of the oldest continuously performing bands in the country. This summer, they’re back at it, doing the usual Monday night run of free concerts from the Exeter bandstand, also known as the Swasey Pavilion.

Courtesy

Aerosmith has been going strong for decades, but the legendary rock band actually traces its roots back to New Hampshire.

Lead singer Steven Tyler and guitarist Joe Perry met in Sunapee, where they spent their childhood summers, and the rest is rock history.

On Saturday, the Sunapee Historical Society will be transformed into a shrine of sorts for the band when it hosts Aerosmith History Day.

Memorabilia spanning the band’s nearly 50-year career will be on display.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Hundreds of volunteers will head to lakes across the state Saturday for an annual census of New Hampshire's loons. The count is organized by the Loon Preservation Committee, a New Hampshire-based non-profit.

The backers of marijuana legalization think the study commission set up by legislation that's soon hitting Governor Sununu's desk will be stacked against relaxing marijuana laws.

Portsmouth Police Department

A New Hampshire House Rep. from Hudson has been charged with sexually assaulting a 16-year-old girl.

Eddie Cheuk

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office has initiated a criminal investigation into St. Paul's School, the prestigious Concord prep school at the center of the high-profile sexual assault trial of a former student in 2015, and a recent report detailing a decades-long history of sexual abuse by members of the school's faculty.

Courtesy Tony Alter via Flickr/Creative Commons.

We know…we’ve been remiss, and it’s time to talk about the elephant in the room. Something Wild, as you know, is a chance to take a closer look at the wildlife, ecosystems and marvelous phenomena you can find in and around New Hampshire. But over the years there is one species in New Hampshire that we haven’t spent much time examining. A species, I think that has been conspicuous in its absence. Humans.

Wikimedia Commons

NASCAR is back in New Hampshire this weekend. Races will be held Saturday and Sunday at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, where a hundred thousand fans are expected to watch some of the country’s top NASCAR drivers burn rubber.

Drivers are entering the second half of their race season, and they’ll find themselves on an unforgiving track here in New Hampshire.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

If you’ve visited the grocery store beer aisle lately, you might have noticed a growing number of beer options, many of them brewed right here in New Hampshire.

These hoppy IPAs, porters, and session ales are all part of the craft beer movement.

Peter Biello / NHPR

At the long polished granite bar at Sushi Time in Plaistow, Beth and David Cacchiotti take their seats. The bartender puts two yellow drinks in front of them.

"Did you just order?" I ask Beth, pointing to her drink.

"I didn't need to order," she replies. "He just knows." 

On this Saturday afternoon, it's a Mai Tai. Other days, it's a martini. "I could go either way," she says.

GIPHY

Remember how we asked you to send us your questions about New Hampshire? You delivered, and then some — and now, we’re happy to report, we have some answers.

City of Rochester

Officials in Rochester are investigating what they say is illegal oil dumping into the city’s sewer system.

City officials say they first detected oil in the sewer system last November, then again every month since February.

Director of City Services John Storer says it seems to be dumped on semi-regular basis and is most likely waste oil – something the city offers to properly dispose of for free.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu has issued his first veto since taking office in January, on a bill aimed to set statewide standards for votes on zoning variances.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

At least 10 people have died from overdoses related to carfentanil in New Hampshire so far this year, according to the latest edition of a semi-monthly report on drug deaths.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

July tends to be a quiet month in New Hampshire’s political calendar. That’s why candidates in the special election for the District 16 New Hampshire Senate seat are doing their best to remind voters to get to the polls later this month.

Neurologists will be able to help treat potential stroke patients en route to the hospital through a new telemedicine system at New Hampshire's Catholic Medical Center.

The first 60 minutes after someone arrives at a hospital with stroke symptoms are a critical window for starting treatments that can limit the side effects and potential damage of a stroke.

The TeleStroke Ambulance Program allows ambulance crews to communicate with neurologists via a tablet to begin evaluating patients even before they get to the hospital.

More than five decades after establishing the first state lottery, New Hampshire is for the first time dedicating a portion of lottery profits toward treatment for gambling addiction.

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