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NH Fish and Game Department

A total of eleven snowmobile accidents were to blame for three deaths and multiple injuries across New Hampshire this past weekend. Officials with the state Fish & Game Department say they need more officers to handle the volume of calls.

The accidents ranged from snowmobiles crashing into trees, catching fire, and falling through thin ice.

Three people, including a 15-year-old from New York died after falling through the ice on Lake Winnipesaukee in two separate incidents.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College is joining other Ivy League schools in opposing President Trump’s immigration order.

The Hanover-based school, along with 16 other elite institutions, filed a legal brief in a New York federal court on Monday. The colleges and universities argue that the travel ban, which is currently on hold following a federal appeals court ruling, would harm their ability to attract and educate the world’s best scholars.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Party leaders on both sides of the aisle are defending New Hampshire's electoral system in the wake of another unsubstantiated claim by President Donald Trump that there's massive voter fraud happening in the state.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

New Hampshire's budget process continues this week as House Finance members now take a crack at crafting a new state spending plan.

  Officials in Durham are responding to concerns from local businesses about itinerant vendors clogging the town’s sidewalks.

According to town administrator Todd Selig, several businesses in downtown Durham have raised concerns about traveling vendors -- both for what they see as unfair competition from merchants who pay no property taxes, and for pedestrian safety.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  A new poll from the University of New Hampshire shows Granite Staters are split in their opinion of President Donald Trump’s performance in office so far.

Less than a month into Donald Trump’s presidency, 48 percent of New Hampshire residents disapprove of the job he’s doing, while 43 percent say they approve of his performance.

Jason Moon for NHPR

People who live with blindness are used to finding creative ways to do things most of us take for granted. But recently a group of people with vision loss did something that surprised even them -- they went ice-skating.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning in effect from noon Sunday through early Monday morning. The blizzard watch predicts heavy and blowing snow will lead to accumulations between 14-20 inches over much of the state.

The snow is expected to develop Sunday afternoon and will be heavy at times, falling at a rate of two to three inches per hour.

Maybe you've been stuck inside the last few days. Or maybe you're not among the lucky ones who had a snow day and, in turn, have been busy with other things this week. Or maybe you read about the second round of snow that might be on deck this weekend and want to make sure you have a full reading list in case you're stuck inside again. In any case, keep scrolling — we've got you covered. 

He didn't talk about it much as a candidate but as Governor Chris Sununu has made passage of a right-to-work law a top priority.

Sununu invoked it in his inauguraul address and in a speech at the state GOP's annual meeting. Right to work cleared the senate but may be losing steam in the house, where the labor committee voted to reject it by a 2-1 margin. The full house votes on it next week. Sununu says he expects a tight vote but won't take the lead in workign to convince those still on the fence.  

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

Officials with the state University System are registering their disappointment with Governor Chris Sununu’s proposal not to increase state funding for New Hampshire’s public universities.

The University System of New Hampshire requested an increase of about 12 million dollars over the next two fiscal years. They said the increase would allow them to keep tuition flat for in-state students.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon

Fisher populations are down, there’s consensus among wildlife biologists at least about that. But why that is happening is open to debate, as is what to do about it. 

Something Wild sat down with a couple of wildlife biologists recently who disagree; Meade Cadot, former Executive Director of the Harris Center for Conservation Education, and Patrick Tate, leader of the state’s fur-bearer project for NH Fish and Game.

cinematreasures.org

  One of New Hampshire’s oldest movie theaters could be yours for the right price.

The owner of the 102-year-old Peterborough Community Theatre announced this week that she’s putting it up for sale. The single-screen, 95-seat theater dates back to 1914.

Carol Nelson is the theatre’s owner, and is a longtime Peterborough resident.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu laid out his 2-year budget proposal Thursday afternoon at the State House.

The plan comes in at roughly $12 billion with increased spending for public kindergarten, state infrastructure and the opioid crisis.

http://aliengearholsters.com/

A bill doing away with the permit requirement for carrying a concealed firearm is headed to Governor Chris Sununu’s desk after the House voted in favor of it Thursday. 

Plenty of lawmakers didn’t make it to through the snow to the State House Thursday, but the House still managed to pass a bill to repeal New Hampshire’s concealed carry law.

Speaking just before the roll call, Representative John Burt urged the House to vote as it had before.

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

Dairy farmers in the Granite State hurt by the recent drought are one step closer to a helping hand after the senate voted in favor of a financial relief program Thursday.

Hannah McCarthy for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu delivered his budget address Thursday, outlining his priorities as the state Legislature kicks off its biannual budget writing cycle.

NHPR's newsroom has been reporting on what to expect this budget season — you can find a rundown on that right here — and now, we're offering more context on the things Sununu mentioned in the budget address itself.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Update: Thanks to all who sent in your questions! We received dozens in response, and to allow our team to prepare for Monday's interview, we're no longer soliciting additional questions at this time. 

Make sure to tune in Monday morning (on-air or online) to hear the full conversation with Gov. Chris Sununu — and, potentially, to hear an answer to questions from your fellow New Hampshire residents.

Courtesy/NH Audubon

  There’s a different kind of census happening in New Hampshire this weekend.

Bird enthusiasts across the state will be taking part in the Backyard Winter Bird Survey this coming Saturday and Sunday.

The event is organized each year by the New Hampshire Audubon as a way to keep track of what’s happening with our state’s winter birds.

Becky Suomala is survey coordinator for New Hampshire Audubon. She talked to NHPR’s Morning Edition about the survey.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

A New Hampshire House Committee is recommending against passage of Right-to- Work legislation, which would prohibit unions from forcing non-union members to pay fees to cover the cost of collective bargaining.

Members of the House Labor Committee voted 14-7, with many Republicans joining Democrats in opposition to the often partisan issue.

The bill next heads to the full House, which will take up the measure next week.

Hundreds of opponents filled Representatives Hall in Concord Wednesday, many wearing red t-shirts, to voice their concerns to lawmakers.

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

Gov. Chris Sununu helped to announce a new partnership on Wednesday aimed at reducing the stigma of addiction.   

Speak Up New Hampshire is the latest campaign from the Partnership for a Drug-Free New Hampshire. Joined by the Bureau for Drug and Alcohol Services, the Governor’s Commission, and various addiction treatment and prevention organizations, the Partnership is now concentrating on reducing the stigma of addiction in the Granite State.

NHPR/Hannah McCarthy

A paid family and medical leave bill won’t be voted on this year, despite community and bipartisan support. Representative Mary Gile, the primary sponsor of the bill, is still holding out hope for its future.

The bill, which would establish a paid family and medical leave insurance program in New Hampshire, was given a consolation prize in committee on Tuesday. Legislators voted to retain the bill, meaning that it will move to a subcommittee for further deliberation, and be voted on next year.

NHPR Staff

Governor Chris Sununu delivers his budget proposal to lawmakers this week. It’s the first step in a months-long journey to build a two-year spending plan that will affect nearly every aspect of life in New Hampshire.

To help you prepare for the months of headlines to come, NHPR reporters are highlighting areas of the budget that are likely to generate the most discussion.

 

No one has ever called crafting a state budget easy. There are thousands of decisions and myriad competing interests. And for a new governor, there is also the crunch of getting it all done and printed a mere six weeks after taking office.

But if Gov. Chris Sununu is at all anxious about his final product, he isn’t showing it.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

While Representative Norman Silber, a first-term Republican from Gilford, initially hoped to get rid of same-day voter registration, he now says it seems like more trouble than it’s worth at this time.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Manchester’s public health director says based on last year’s numbers, the city’s drug problem is still serious but efforts to address it are working.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Ottessa Moshfegh says she writes to explore why people do weird things. The daughter of a Croatian mother and Iranian father, she was a serious piano student who knew she didn't want to be a pianist when she felt the call to write - and not just write, but be bold.

We spoke to her before her reading at Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Mass.

Episode Music: Kevin MacLeod, "Trio for Piano, Violin and Viola"
Credit Music: Uncanny Valleys, "Curious or Disconcerting"

SalFalko via Flickr CC

  The debate over whether to bring casino gambling to New Hampshire – and the eventual rejection of any such proposal – has become an annual tradition of sorts at the Statehouse.

Year after year, lawmakers have shot down bills that would legalize casinos, though sometimes by the slimmest of margins; a proposal in 2014 lost in the House by just one vote.

But that history isn’t stopping state Senator Lou D’Allesandro, a longtime casino proponent.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

At first glance, one of the voting bills introduced by Representative David Bates this week would seem to be just a minor change, removing just four words from an existing statute.

The Windham Republican wants to strike part of the state law defining what it means to be a resident or inhabitant, or what it means to claim residency — specifically, the part that extends that definition to include people who intend to remain in New Hampshire "for the indefinite future." Those definitions, in turn, are used to help decide who’s eligible to vote in New Hampshire.

Herry Lanford via Flickr/CC

Repeal, Replace, Repair, Retain. Now that they’re in a position to dismantle Obamacare, some in the GOP appear to be urging restraint. Even President Trump, who joined the Repeal and Replace rallying cry during his campaign, has recently sounded more hesitant, suggesting that a new plan may be in place next year.

Republicans in Congress have meanwhile been contemplating their next steps, said Dan Gorenstein, senior reporter for Marketplace's Health Desk, on  The Exchange.

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