News

Getty Images | NPR

After mass shootings, mental health professionals find themselves at pains to explain that people with mental illness are more likely to be victims of violence than aggressors.

And they’re more likely to die by suicide than to harm others.

That’s again been part of the conversation after the Texas church shooting in which 26 people died, and the shooter, by several accounts, dealt with some form of mental illness or instability, including erratic, violent behavior.

NHPR on Instagram

The New Hampshire Department of Transportation says advisory speeds on Interestate 93 have been reduced to 45 mph between Exit 20 and Exit 32 due to snow showers and wintry conditions.

Crews are out treating roads in central and northern New Hampshire.

According to the National Weather Service, snow could accumulate to less than one inch, with showers expected to taper off later this evening.

NHPR File

Don't expect school bus passengers in New Hampshire to be required to buckle up anytime soon.

A committee of state lawmakers studying a school bus seat belt requirement is not recommending any such legislation. The committee was formed in compliance with a House Bill that was signed into law in April.

“There’s just not a lot of data to support that an effort this massive is really going to help,” says Rep. Steven Smith, the committee's chairman.

There were 40 hate crimes reported in the state last year, the highest number of bias-related incidents since 2010.

The annual hate crimes statistics figures released by the FBI on Monday finds that fifteen of the hate crimes reported in the state last year were associated with race or ethnicity.

Giphy via reddit/r/gifs

One of the most successful public health campaigns in U.S. history took the form of a nationwide decision to simply buckle our seat belts.

We formed that habit primarily because every state in the country passed a law that made it mandatory. 

Every state, that is, except one.

This week for Only in NH, the series in which we answer listener-submitted questions about the Granite State, producer Ben Henry explores our state’s staunch insistence on remaining the unbuckled frontier.

Governor Chris Sununu has replaced the chairman of the state Fish and Game Commission following the commission's strong public criticism of the governor around public boat access on Lake Sunapee.

Plans for a new boat access at what’s known as the Wild Goose Site had been in the works for decades when Governor Sununu pulled the plug on the project in July. Sununu cited environmental and traffic concerns in his decision.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

A state office in Lebanon that helps people with disabilities find employment will close in December. It’s the latest in multiple closings of state agencies in the city within the past decade.

Courtesy of Coast Guard

The U.S. Coast Guard says the crew of a fishing trawler that had to be rescued off the coast of New Hampshire did exceptionally well handling 25 to 30 knot winds, 6-to 8-foot waves and near zero degree wind chills.

The captain of the 65-foot Black Beauty contacted the Coast Guard early Friday evening after the boat's transmission failed with five people and 30,000 pounds of fish on board. The Coast Guard Cutter Campbell responded, arriving on scene about 3:30 a.m. Saturday. The cutter towed the vessel to Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Some landlords aren't happy with changes to a bill aimed at reducing the hazard that lead paint poses to children's health.

The House Finance Committee last week recommended passage of a bill that would require health care providers to offer lead testing to all children age 2 and younger. The bill would also lower the threshold necessary to trigger mandatory action by landlords to remove harmful sources of lead.

The Concord Monitor reports that the bill will head to the full House in January with an amendment that many property owners oppose.

Courtesy of Bretton Wood's Facebook page

With two ski areas kicking off the season this past weekend, winter tourism in New Hampshire is officially here.

Courtesy of the N.H. Supreme Court

Linda Dalianis, the head of New Hampshire’s highest court, is stepping down after nearly eight years on the job.

Many in the state’s legal community say she’ll leave a lot to be remembered by after almost four decades as a judge.

Title/ Artist/ Album/ Label

You Reap What You Sow/ Mara Levine/ Single/ Marablevine.com

Woody's Fire/ Katie Dahl, Eric Lewis, Rich Higdon/ Solid Ground/ Leaky Boat Records

Swing and Turn / Laura Cortese & the Dance Cards/ California Calling/ Compass Records

Daniel O'Connor;Kitty's Wedding/ Two Old Friends/ Portsmouth/ Crooked Cove

I'm Going Home/ Arlo Guthrie/ Alice's Restaurant/ Warner Brothers

I Sing/ Joe Crookston/ Darkling & the BlueBird Jubilee/ Milagrito Records

MUSIC EVENTS

Every Monday

>>>Wild Eagles Blues Jam at the Stone Church ~ Newmarket, NH ~ 7:30pm

http://www.stonechurchrocks.com/

>>>Hootenanny at the Salt Hill Pub ~ Hanover, NH ~ 6pm ~ www.salthillpub.com

>>>Bluegrass Jam at McNeill’s Brewery ~ Brattleboro, VT ~ 8:30pm ~

MUSIC EVENTS

Every Monday

>>>Wild Eagles Blues Jam at the Stone Church ~ Newmarket, NH ~ 7:30pm

http://www.stonechurchrocks.com/

>>>Hootenanny at the Salt Hill Pub ~ Hanover, NH ~ 6pm ~ www.salthillpub.com

>>>Bluegrass Jam at McNeill’s Brewery ~ Brattleboro, VT ~ 8:30pm ~

NHPR Staff

Allegations of sexual misconduct involving three professors in the Psychological and Brain Sciences Department at Dartmouth College do not relate to the professors' treatment of human research subjects, according to the college.

 

In the past few months, the Manchester VA Medical Center met with scandal, disaster, and a full helping of public outcry. Today on Word of Mouth, NHPR's Peter Biello looks back on the summer's news and tells the story of one woman's effort to improve hospital facilities for survivors of military sexual trauma. 

CREDIT WWW.P2012.ORG

A former State Representative is no longer running for Congress.

Courtesy of Bretton Woods' Facebook page

This weekend in New Hampshire will be a cold one...cold enough to even go skiing.

Courtesy of the N.H. State Veterans Cemetry

Top New Hampshire officials will be at the state’s Veterans Cemetery Saturday in honor of Veterans Day.

Cori Princell/NHPR

For the past few months, visitors to the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester have had a chance to spend quality time with the artist Claude Monet.  Since July, the museum has had an exhibition, Monet: Pathways to Impressionism, showing works by the famous French painter. This is the final weekend to see it – it closes Monday.  

It’s just 4 paintings, in a small gallery with the walls painted deep red.  But together, the works tell a story about the artist.

Peter Biello / NHPR

All this week, we're honoring military veterans by sharing their stories of service. Today, we hear from Army Veteran Michael F. Richmond of Claremont, New Hampshire. When he was in the Army in the 1980s, he witnessed history in the making in Berlin. But the Army wasn't his plan "A" or even plan "B."  

Peter Biello / NHPR

In the late 1880s, rail was creeping across western America, connecting towns and changing lives. The west was still relatively wild in those days, and that Wild West is the setting of the new young adult novel by Erin Bowman. Retribution Rails is the story of a young man caught up with a band of cold-hearted killers and thieves and the young woman who aspires to write for a newspaper, any paper, and prove that she can write just as well, if not better, than any man out there. Erin Bowman spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Jack Mallory

For many Americans, the Vietnam War is a long, complex, and oft-misunderstood chapter of American history. But the recent ten-part documentary by filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novak stirred up a national discussion about Vietnam. We speak with four veterans of the war about the documentary, and their own experiences. 

(Scroll down to read the story of Natt King, another New Hampshire veteran who shared his story off the air.)

  This show was originally broadcast on Oct. 17, 2017.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Former White House chief strategist and head of Breitbart News Steve Bannon spoke to New Hampshire Republicans last night at an event in Manchester.

As people arrived at the Executive Court Banquet Facility in Manchester to hear Bannon speak, many of them were greeted by "boos" from across the street.

Dozens of people like Hassan Essa, who recently ran for alderman in Manchester, stood in a line with glowing signs that read "no hate in Granite State."

Essa said he just couldn’t understand why some people would pay as much $750 to hear Bannon speak.

A common theme on Something Wild is breeding. (Which is why we always sip our tea with our pinkies extended.) Seriously, though, we talk about the how, when and where because there are a lot of different reproductive strategies that have evolved in nature. Today we take a closer look at two such strategies through the lens of "how often": semelparity and iteroparity.

Peter Biello / NHPR

All this week, we're honoring military veterans by sharing their stories of service. Today, former Marine  Tim McLaughlin talks about a transformative day for him and for the U.S.: September 11, 2001. 

Cheryl Senter / NHPR

The executive council unanimously voted this week to promote Deputy Corrections Commissioner Helen Hanks as the new head of the department.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

The Trump administration’s election commission has gone largely silent since its September meeting in Manchester. But one of its members, Maine Secretary of State Matt Dunlap, says even he is having trouble finding out basic information about the commission’s work — and he’s now filing a lawsuit seeking more transparency.

The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard is hosting a job fair next week.

The shipyard is hoping the fair will help them fill about 160 open positions.

The positions range from chemists and electricians to painters and pipefitters.

In a statement, shipyard commander Captain Dave Hunt says their workload is increasing and they need the extra help to keep up.

The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard repairs and refits nuclear-powered submarines.

The facility already employs more than 5,500 civilian employees. The fair will run Nov. 14 from noon to 8 p.m. in Eliot, Maine.

Courtesy of Project 439

The state’s first needle exchange program in Claremont has closed its doors, at least for now.

Pages