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A 70-year man from Clarksville was killed Saturday morning in a crash on Route 3 near Colebrook, according to state police.

 The victim was Robert L. Eidell, who was southbound in a 2007 Chevrolet HHR when it collided with a 2003 Hyundai Sante Fe sport utility driven by Robert J. Queen, 74, of Woburn, Massachusetts.

 Police said their investigation indicates the accident occurred when Queen “drifted into the southbound lane” a little after 9 a.m. just south of the state-run rest area.

Grand plans for a huge resort community around the Mount Washington Hotel have fallen apart and a foreclosure auction is planned.

About 900 acres surrounding the Mount Washington resort – including two golf courses - are going on the auction block late in June.

 That includes about 500 wooded acres that the owners had hoped could be turned into a huge, upscale development with hundreds of homes and retail shops.

When it comes to living a series of gritty soap operas, it would be hard to beat John Loven's life.

He’s a probation and parole officer for Northern Carroll County.

The world he sees things could not be further from the hotels, ski resorts and lives led by most people.

In the first of an occasional series looking at a day-in-the-life of some of the people who work in North Country, NHPR’s Chris Jensen followed John Loven as he made his rounds.

 “Good morning.”

  “Good morning.”

How has technology changed the ways that we interact with one another? Sherry Turkle's Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other is the third in a trilogy exploring this question. Social networking, e-mail and texting, Turkle says, provide the façade of socialization but ultimately leave their users dissatisfied and disconnected. It may be time to reflect and reconsider the role we really want technology to play in our lives.

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Maybe it’s all the knives, or the blood. But there’s something a little eerie about a slaughterhouse on wheels.

If you raise chickens, or lamb, or hunt deer for food, you might need the service of a good roving butcher. Like Ray Garcia of Cabin View Farms in Littleton. Solo, he can process about 200 chickens a day in a home built rolling abattoir:

It’s a Wells Fargo Trailer. We have stainless steel tables, stainless steel sinks. If it wasn’t for a lot of the custom facilities throughout New Hampshire, a lot of people wouldn’t be raising things.

When the farmer shuts down his combine, there’s nothing left but a stubbled plain. You might think the harvesting is done. But that’s when the gleaners appear - to begin the second harvest.

Like the Robin Hoods of produce, the gleaners take from the rich soil, and give to the poor. But the gleaners aren’t vegetable pirates. They work with and alongside the farmers:

You gotta carry buckets with you through the fields, picking up small things. You’re constantly bent over on your knees for the whole day.

Got Milk? Maybe you do. But how about this: Got raw milk?

While the USDA opposes the sale of raw milk – they’d prefer you drink pasteurized - raw milk - straight from the cow, filtered and chilled - is making a comeback. It’s now sold in 28 states. Don’t bother looking for it at the store though.

People need to come here and they need to bring their own containers. They come here so they can see my animals, they can see our operation. They can decide for themselves whether the animals look healthy, whether everything’s clean.

The humble chicken, that bowling ball with a bad case of feathers, has returned to America's backyard.

Pam Miller in Campton says the urge for chickens is connected to a deeper cultural movement:

We've tried to take care of our energy use with our solar panels and our hybrid car. And the next big thing is the food.

Stone Walls Make Good Fences

Dec 12, 2009
Lorianne DiSabato via Flickr/Creative Commons

  New England's distinctive stone walls are estimated to stretch 240,000 miles, the distance from Earth to the Moon. Though the layout seems maze-like, there was a method behind the construction. And with winter's reduced foliage, now is an especially good time to take a closer look. 

 

A homesteading family worked the land in four ways, each requiring different precision of sifting of the land.

Fresh Greens: Street Teams

Sep 1, 2009

Walk down any busy street in a city or college town and you’ll likely be approached by an eager young person with a clipboard asking, “Do you have a minute to save the environment?” Zoe Martin of Youth Spin community radio wondered why environmental street teams almost always ask for money, in addition to her time.

About 4500 people living in New Hampshire were born in India. And more than a third of them live in Nashua. They do their best to keep their connections with their culture through their cooking and recreation - Nashua alone has five cricket teams. But one thing they don't have is a place to pray. Now a group of local residents is saying it's time to open a Hindu temple.

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