News

A common theme on Something Wild is breeding. (Which is why we always sip our tea with our pinkies extended.) Seriously, though, we talk about the how, when and where because there are a lot of different reproductive strategies that have evolved in nature. Today we take a closer look at two such strategies through the lens of "how often": semelparity and iteroparity.

pixabay.com

In its first hearing on the proposal, the Senate Finance Committee heard from a bipartisan group of lawmakers, an economist and even a doctor urging them to endorse a paid family and medical leave program.

But they also heard from the Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Employment Security, Richard Lavers, who cautioned that setting up such a program would require a significant time, money and staff resources.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

A plan to extend New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion another five years cleared a major hurdle in the House of Representatives on Thursday. The House approved the bill by a vote of 222-125, over the objections of some Republicans who argued Medicaid expansion has been a failure and has driven up health insurance costs.

Jason Moon for NHPR

An addiction recovery center in Rochester celebrated a major expansion Thursday.

SOS Recovery started on the Seacoast just over 18 months ago in response to the worsening opioid crisis in the region. Since then, the peer recovery center says it’s had over 2,000 visits from people seeking help.

SOS Recovery Director John Burns says the demand was overwhelming their old space which was just about 500 square feet.

On Thursday, the center celebrated an expansion to 2,000 square feet, which is being offered by First Church Congregational at a steep discount.

Peter Biello/NHPR

Allegations of substandard care at the Manchester VA have largely gone unchallenged, at least publicly, since whistleblowers came forward last summer. And now we are learning why. 

Dr. Michael Mayo-Smith was the leader of the VA new England Health Care System until last month, when he abruptly retired. He says the VA chose to take a no-response approach and wait for public interest in the allegations to wane. Now that he's retired, he's able to speak publicly about what happened behind the scenes from his perspective.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

The New Hampshire House of Representatives dealt a blow Thursday to one of Governor Chris Sununu’s key priorities on the opioid front, the Recovery Friendly Workplace initiative.

The effort aims to link the private sector to the drug crisis by helping businesses better attract and retain people in recovery.

It was significant news when Hope for New Hampshire announced in February it was closing four of its five recovery centers around the state. Hope was one of the biggest operators of these facilities, which are widely recognized as a critical support for people in recovery.

Since then, after a scramble to secure more public funds and a big effort in some communities to keep services running, just one of those original four locations remains closed for good. That’s in Concord.

Scott Reynolds

Only a couple of dozen bats spent this past winter in New Hampshire.

That’s down from thousands a decade ago, before a fungus called white nose syndrome decimated many species’ populations in 2009.

Biologist Scott Reynolds says since then, the mine shafts where bats used to hibernate in large numbers have been pretty empty.

But white nose has also subsided in New Hampshire.

Now, Reynolds says recovery for the species hit hardest, such as little brown bats, is just beginning.

On Thursday, the State of New Hampshire filed a legal brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case South Dakota v. Wayfair, which is scheduled for oral arguments later this month.

The case could have huge ramifications for how businesses collect sales taxes when selling goods to customers across state lines.

Katherine Garrova

The trend of the speakeasy bar - drinking establishments that play with the history of our prohibition days - has taken off in big cities like New York and L.A. But New Hampshire now has at least a couple secretive watering holes of its own.

There’s a new place to grab a drink in Concord called Chuck’s BARbershop. Liu Vaine is the owner and he's started up a similar place in Nashua called CodeX.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 New Hampshire Sen. Maggie Hassan is backing Executive Councilor Chris Pappas in the crowded 1st Congressional District race.

It’s pretty early for a big endorsement like this -- the primary election isn’t until September. But Hassan, a Democrat, told a crowd of people inside Water Street Books in Exeter that people keep asking her who she’s voting for and she decided it’s best to tell them now.

U.S. Court of Appeals

 

An immigrant from Brazil living in New Hampshire has won a temporary stay from a federal court to block his deportation, hours before he was ordered to board a plane.

The 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston said it needed time to review the case of 65-year-old Elvecio Viana, of Nashua.

Viana's lawyers say he came into the United States 27 years ago on a visa. He recently filed papers for permanent resident status.

Eversource

Update, 11 a.m. -- Eversource has restored power to more than 45,000 customers who lost electricity during the high winds Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

New Hampshire's largest utility reported 8,743 without power at 11 a.m.

--------------------------  

(An earlier story follows here.)

Strong winds overnight caused thousands of power outages across New Hampshire.

Eversource, the state's largest utility, reported 15,794 customers with electricity, as of daybreak.

Courtesy of Hitchiner Manufacturing

A Milford-based manufacturer says it will break ground on a new 85,000-square foot plant this summer.

Hitchiner Manufacturing casts parts for the aerospace, defense and automotive industries. It announced Thursday it will build a new $50 million facility on its Elm Street campus.

Company officials say the expansion wouldn’t have been possible without the support of local and state officials.

Ryan Lessard for NHPR

The chairman of the Governor’s Council on Diversity and Inclusion is raising questions about the announcement of UNH’s new president, James Dean.

Rogers Johnson, who is also president of the Seacoast NAACP, has called for more transparency in the search process.

Now he says the unveiling of UNH’s choice for president seems to emphasize his ability to raise revenue for the institution.

NHPR File Photo

Opponents of a bill that seeks to increase regulation of commercial dog breeders say the measure will do little to prevent cases of animal cruelty.

During a public hearing on Wednesday, Jane Barlow Roy with the New Hampshire Veterinary Medical Association told a House Environment and Agriculture Committee that while she believes Senate Bill 569 is well intentioned, its new regulations won’t protect animals from harm and doesn’t stop people from hoarding pets.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State Senators heard testimony Wednesday on a bill that would expand the state’s only existing school choice program.

Under the existing system, businesses in New Hampshire can get a tax break when they make donations to scholarships which can be used on a number of educational purposes, including private school tuition, college courses, and homeschool expenses.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

The New Hampshire chapter of the State Employees Association joined local faith leaders in Concord Wednesday to rally for workers' rights.

 

The rally was timed to the 50th anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

Rev. Eric Jackson of the Brookside Congregational Church in Manchester spoke at the Legislative Office Building in Concord.

 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

 

Renewable energy advocates say they want to see more communities cutting emissions and pushing for offshore wind development in New Hampshire.

 

The League of Conservation Voters launched a new campaign in Portsmouth on Wednesday to push for those reforms at the state and local levels. 

 

Sunset Power Lines
Michael Kappel/Flickr CC

In an effort to cut down on infrastructure costs and reduce energy bills for consumers, Liberty Utilities is looking to install batteries in hundreds of homes in the Upper Valley this fall.

The effort is a pilot program involving 300 customers in the Lebanon area, spokesperson John Shore said. Ultimately, the company plans to expand to about 1,000 homes 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Lawmakers are continuing in their attempt to hammer out the details of a controversial school choice bill that was first introduced over 14 months ago.

Senate Bill 193 received yet another set of tweaks on Wednesday. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

State lawmakers are considering a deeper study of asbestos issues in New Hampshire. It would look at how fairly and quickly people who were exposed to the toxic substance can get compensation.

But asbestos lawsuits are all but nonexistent in the Granite State.

Instead, the legislature’s interest in the issue stems from a national campaign – and it has some advocates worried about obstacles for future cases.

UNH

The University of New Hampshire has named James W. Dean Jr. as the 20th President of the state's flagship university.

Dean was recently executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he is a professor of organizational behavior. He will take office June 30, and succeed Mark Huddleston.

The University System of New Hampshire board of trustees voted unanimously to select Dean. 

Lauren Chooljian / NHPR

  And just like that, it was primary season again in New Hampshire on Tuesday.

But does it really ever end?

Two past (and potentially present) presidential hopefuls, Martin O’Malley and John Kasich, made their way through the first-in-the-nation primary state Tuesday.

Sam Hurley

Concord lost one of its most provocative landmarks last Thursday night when artist Thomas Devaney closed his giant Eye for good.  For the last five years the foam and wood sculpture came to life after dark when Devaney turned on his projector and lit the 6-foot by 8-foot structure with a filmed loop of his own blue right eye. NHPR’s Sean Hurley attended the closing of the Eye and sends us this. 

WPS Geography

Environmentalists will kick off a new campaign for clean energy development in Portsmouth Wednesday.

The League of Conservation Voters' "Clean Energy for All" project spans 30 states, including New Hampshire.

State Director Rob Werner says they're unveiling the campaign in Portsmouth because zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions and using all renewable sources of power are now part of that city's energy policy goals.

In Morning Edition's series, Radio Field Trips, we're traveling across the state to bring you stories of New Hampshire life and culture.

This week, we thought we'd grab a beer. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley and producer Mary McIntyre visited an up-and-coming craft brewery in Concord.

Do you have a suggestion for an upcoming Radio Field Trip? Click here to send us an email and let us know!


The Thompson School of Applied Science at UNH will be cutting four programs from its curriculum.

Two-year degrees in horticulture technology, culinary arts and nutrition, civil technology, and integrated agriculture management will not be offered after the 2018-2019 academic year.

All Things Considered Host Peter Biello interviewed UNH horticulture technology student Brooke Wilson about the changes.

(This transcript has been lightly edited.)  

Brooke thank you very much for speaking with me.

PSNH

The first law of thermodynamics says that energy cannot be created or destroyed, but it can change from one form to another. One of those forms is heat. And now an entrepreneur in New Hampshire says he has found a way to make use of the heat given off at power plants to increase the efficiency of those power plants and generate more electricity.

Granite Geek David Brooks, a reporter at the Concord Monitor, joins All Things Considered host Peter Biello to explain how this works.

(This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.)

Jason Moon for NHPR

On the Seacoast, crews are working to repair damage from winter storms in time for the summer tourist season.

At North Hampton State Beach, repairs are being made to a collapsed parking lot and sidewalk.

Pages