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St. Paul's School, the private boarding school in Concord, says it can’t be blamed for a sexual assault that occurred on its campus two years ago. The school is responding to a civil lawsuit the victim’s family filed against St. Paul's earlier this summer.

The state’s Health department says New Hampshire’s fourth and final medical marijuana dispensary will open Thursday in Merrimack.

The Democratic candidates for governor took part in a WGIR radio debate Wednesday. Among other things, the candidates discussed marijuana legalization.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Gov. Maggie Hassan on Wednesday presented her proposals for how she would keep New Hampshire and the country safe if elected to the U.S. Senate this fall.

National security has been a hotly contested issue in the race between Hassan and her opponent, incumbent Sen.  Kelly Ayotte, who has questioned Hassan’s grasp of the topic.

Emily Corwin

New analysis of state and county-wide data shows black and Hispanic people are arrested and incarcerated at higher rates in New Hampshire than whites are, and at more disproportionate rates than blacks and Hispanics nationwide.

Alvimann / Morguefile

Judo was founded in Japan around 1882. It’s an aggregate of techniques drawn from various martial arts. It’s been an Olympic sport since 1964 and has been gaining popularity ever since.

What does it look like?

“Bodies flying through the air…you’ll see a lot of them are very acrobatic,” says Jake Freedman, Head Coach of the University of New Hampshire Judo Club. “They may go very high into the air, and somehow spin in the air like a cat, and land on their fronts.”

David P. Whelan / Morguefile

It’s easy enough to check the weather before you head out for a hike. Maybe you click on the weather app on your smartphone, scan for thunderstorms, and plan accordingly. But when it comes to going for a swim, real-time information on water conditions is not just a click away.

Calling Donald Trump’s latest controversial comment the last straw, former U.S. Senator Gordon Humphrey of New Hampshire is urging Republican leaders to strip Trump of the presidential nomination and replace him with someone "of sound mind."

Speaking to MSNBC, Humphrey said Trump’s suggestion at a rally Tuesday that gun owners could take action to stop Hillary Clinton from appointing U.S. Supreme Court judges went too far.

Monika O'Clair Photography

When Caroline Nesbitt decided to start a theater company in Sandwich in 1999 she was met with a little resistance.  People in town knew her as the woman who raised Connemara Ponies and gave riding lessons.  What they didn’t know was that Nesbitt was also a professional actress. 

Rich Fleischman

Essayist, novelist, columnist, sportswriter and former ethicist for the New York Times Magazine, Chuck Klosterman has got a wildly original voice. That makes sense for a guy who's written about glam metal bands in North Dakota, or whether you should hire a detective to trail your spouse. He's author of several best-sellers including Sex, Drugs & Cocoa Puffs and most recently But What If We're Wrong?: Thinking About the Present As If It Were the Past.

Independent presidential candidate Evan McMullin is not be eligible to be on the ballot in New Hampshire for the November election, according to the Secretary of State’s office.

The former CIA operative announced his campaign bid this week, saying he wants to give voters unhappy with the two major party candidates another option this November.

But Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlan says McMullin didn’t file his declaration of intent paperwork in June, a required step toward getting on the ballot for the fall election.

Jason Moon for NHPR

For over 15 years, a full-size backyard croquet court in Rye has attracted attention as one of the Seacoast’s roadside oddities. For our series Life on the Seacoast, NHPR’s Jason Moon reports on how it got there.

When you stand in the middle of Jim McLaughlin’s croquet court in Rye and look out at Route 1A, you can watch the people in passing cars turn their heads as they try to figure out just what they’re looking at.

Republicans running for U.S. Senate and New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District took part in a candidate forum in Derry Monday night.

Notably absent, however, was the state’s most prominent Republican – U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte, who is up for re-election this fall and is facing a primary challenger.

That meant of the four men taking questions from the audience at the Halligan Tavern in downtown Derry, only three were actually running for office.

News & Brews in Salem

Aug 8, 2016
Sara Plourde / NHPR

News & Brews is heading to Salem for our fourth event in this new series. Join us at Granfanallys Pizza Pub with host Josh Rogers, Senior Political Reporter and Digital Reporter, Casey McDermott.

Patricia Williams

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

This week, The Bookshelf features novelist Deena Goldstone. She joined Peter Biello to discuss her book Surprise Me.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Click photos for slideshow.

For the last few months, Laura McCarthy has been preparing to put a lifetime of training on display before an international audience in Rio de Janeiro—home of this year’s summer Olympics.  No, McCarthy is not an athlete. She’s a fashion designer. And today – a collaboration she’s been working on for months will be draped on a Brazilian model, and strutted down a runway in Rio.

AP Photo / Evan Vucci

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump used a speech in Windham last night to criticize his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton.

Speaking to a crowd of several hundred supporters in a gymnasium at Windham High School, Trump went on the offensive, using a line of attack usually employed by Hillary Clinton against him.

“So ‘unstable Hillary’ she lacks the judgement, temperament and moral character to lead this country. She is a dangerous liar – her greatest achievement is that.”

Olympic.org

If you’re looking for a local angle on this year’s 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, we’ve got you covered.

Here’s a roundup of reports on who’s repping the Granite State at this summer’s games, when to watch those athletes on the field and how everyone else, back in New Hampshire, is looking forward to following along.

After a few weeks' hiatus, we're back! Even when this weekly rundown isn't here to catch you up on what happened around New Hampshire, you can always stay in the loop with our weekly newsletters — sign up here to get them delivered right to your inbox.

NHPR

We’re at an osprey nest in Tilton with Iain McLeod, director of Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. Our goal is recruiting another individual for Project OspreyTrack. He explains that Project OspreyTrack began in 2011, “to try to understand a little bit more about osprey migration and foraging.” 

Despite being only 13 miles long, New Hampshire’s coastline has a variety of beaches on offer during the summer, each with its own distinct atmosphere.

As a part of our Life on the Seacoast series, NHPR’s Jason Moon is bringing us audio postcards from those beaches.

This week, we hear the sounds of Great Island Common in Newcastle.

Kate Harper for NHPR

A new WBUR poll of New Hampshire voters shows that Democrat Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead over her Republican rival Donald Trump in this year’s general election. The poll also has good news for Democrat Maggie Hassan’s bid to unseat Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte. Steve Koczela joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to dissect the results of the poll. Koczela is president of MassINC Polling Group, which conducted the WBUR survey.

Jack Rodolico

The Environmental Protection Agency is accusing one of New Hampshire’s most prominent real estate developers of breaking two federal lead paint laws. It’s the latest in a string of public health complaints against Brady Sullivan Properties. 

The EPA wants Brady Sullivan Properties to pay close to $140,000 in fines. 

Hannah McCarthy

If you know what to look for, a hike in the New Hampshire woods can be a harvest. At least it is for one Henniker man who has started a business selling foraged herbal tinctures.  

Rob Wolfe leads the way through an overgrown field toward a tangle of bushes and tall grass. Just down the street from his home, he knows where to look for wild foods in season. Wolfe pauses on his way to inspect a small tree.

Jack Rodolico, NHPR

This week, NHPR has been looking at what homelessness means in New Hampshire. As part of our series No Place to Go: Homeless in New Hampshire,  we visited the PK Motel in Effingham, and heard about how having a roof over your head isn’t the same as having a home.

So where is that line so many families are straddling, between financial insecurity and having no place to live?

Dean Christon is Executive Director of New Hampshire’s Housing Finance Authority and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk through some of these issues.

In 1979, fifty New Hampshire residents came together to form a committee that would create the state’s own public radio station—Granite State Public Radio. A year after its incorporation, GSPR received $61,000 in planning grants, and filed an application with the Federal Communication Commission.

On August 4, 1981, WEVO- Concord signed on from a small studio on Pleasant Street in Concord, broadcasting on 89.1 FM.

This is what that sounded like:

Jack Rodolico

It’s nearly impossible to say how many homeless people there are in New Hampshire. And the biggest reason is that most people without a home in this state aren’t on the street or in shelters—they actually have a roof over their heads.

Some sleep on couches, and some rent rooms by the week at a place like the P.K. Motel in Effingham.

This story is the last installment in a special series on homelessness. Click here to see and listen to all the stories

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Each year since 2010, the conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity has asked New Hampshire candidates to sign onto a “pledge” vowing to cut taxes and spending, as well as to oppose the Affordable Care Act.

And usually, the Republicans running for governor are quick to sign on. That's not the case this year.

Doug Kerr

Communities in New Hampshire are grappling with this question: where are homeless people supposed to go? Cities tend to answer that question by spelling out where homeless people can’t be, imposing bans on panhandling and camping. That's often called criminalizing homelessness.

We hear now about one city that recently came together to strike down one of those bans—Lebanon, N.H. Tim McNamara is on the city council there and was at the public hearing where over 100 people turned out. He joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these issues.

Jack Rodolico

It’s no secret drugs like OxyContin and hydromorphone are highly addictive.

The real question is this: do drug companies downplay how addictive they are while marketing the medicine to doctors?

New Hampshire’s Attorney General Joe Foster suspects false marketing of legal pills has led to abuse of illicit drugs like heroin. That’s why he subpoenaed the nation’s largest manufacturers of prescription painkillers.

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