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Republican incumbent Senator Kelly Ayotte and primary challenger Jim Rubens faced off in a debate on WMUR TV last night.

From the very outset of the debate, a clear dynamic emerged between Ayotte and Rubens.

New Hampshire Public Radio is excited to partner with Stay Work Play to present the annual Rising Stars Awards. Each year the Rising Stars Awards celebrate and recognize New Hampshire's remarkable young professionals, young entrepreneurs, and college students, initiatives to keep them here, and the businesses and programs that go the extra mile to recruit and retain them.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Former defense industry executive Republican Rich Ashooh is running for Congress in New Hampshire’s first district. He’s hoping to unseat incumbent Republican Frank Guinta. 

In recent interviews and debates, he’s characterized himself as an outsider, a new face, someone who could succeed where the incumbent has failed. Rich Ashooh spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about his ideas.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Update, Sept. 7: You can find Republican Ted Gatsas' completed questionnaire here.

Taxes. The economy. Education spending. The opioid epidemic. New Hampshire's next governor faces a long list of policy challenges when he or she takes office in January. With the largest field of contenders in at least two decades, sorting through the gubernatorial candidates' positions on these and other issues is no easy task.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

This year’s race for New Hampshire governor has a crowded and diverse field. There are legislators, mayors, executive councilors, and all with private sector experience.

As part of our primary coverage, we’re looking at how those experiences shape the candidates' bid for the corner office. All Things Considered host Peter Biello talked with NHPR reporter Paige Sutherland about Republican Jeanie Forrester and her time as chairwoman of the Senate Finance Committee. 

The major candidates for governor met in a debate Tuesday night on WMUR, giving the hopefuls the chance to press their cases to a statewide TV audience.

The Republicans sought traction on issues of core importance to GOP voters.


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With its parent company shutting down, the future of Daniel Webster College is uncertain.

ITT Educational Services purchased the Nashua college in 2009. The chain of for-profit colleges announced this week its more than 130 technical institutes across the country would close immediately.

Screen Shot of WMUR Debate

The major Democratic candidates for governor debated Tuesday night on WMUR-TV. 

Steve Marchand, Colin Van Ostern and Mark Connolly debated topics such as the opioid crisis, climate change and the minimum wage.

But the most relevant question may have been the very first one posed by moderator Josh McElveen.

All this week, Morning Edition is talking to the Republican candidates for governor.

Frank Edelblut is a first-term state representative from Wilton.

THOMAS FEARON

The Executive Council is slated to vote Wednesday on a contract between the state hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Hospital. The vote comes as an independent investigation gets underway about a former patient's suicide. 

NHPR

Democratic candidate for governor Steve Marchand says he is the most liberal person in this year’s race.  But he’s asking people to put aside some assumptions about what the term “liberal” means.  Speaking with All Things Considered host Peter Biello, NHPR's Emily Corwin explains.

Biello:  First of all, tell me a bit about Steve Marchand. He may be more familiar to Seacoast listeners than to folks elsewhere in the state.

Texas A&M AgriLife

Algae blooms in lakes and ponds across northern New England are becoming more and more common. These can kill fish and cause terrible odors. Now there’s an app to track these blooms. BloomWatch allows users to easily report when they know of a pond that has suddenly blossomed with microscopic bacteria. Granite Geek David Brooks has been writing about the app for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

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New research from the University of New Hampshire says taxes or bans on plastic bags are the most effective ways to manage their impact on the environment.

The research looked at the ways 13 different states and cities around the country have attempted to manage the use of plastic bags – from bans, to taxes, to recycling programs.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

All this week, Morning Edition is talking with the Republican candidates running for governor.

Monday morning, we heard from Jeanie Forrester. She’s in her third term as a state Senator from Meredith, and currently chairs the Senate Finance Committee.

Steve Duprey

State transportation officials say they're not sure who put up the decal of an exotic dancer on a Route 101 west highway sign promoting local attractions.

It's not clear how long it was up there, but state Department of Transportation spokesman Bill Boynton told the Union Leader it was taken down Sunday as soon as it was brought to the state's attention.

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A 4-year-old girl died after being thrown from a horse during the White Mountain Riding Club Horse Show at the Lancaster Fair.

Mackennah Mae Caulder was brought to Weeks Medical Center for treatment following the incident Friday, where she died from her injuries. 

Her family is remembering her a "happy little girl with a spit fire personality," according to her obituary.

John K via Flickr CC

Sinks and water fountains in nine Manchester schools have been turned off after testing found levels at or higher than acceptable levels. 

The school district tested water in all of its 22 schools over the summer, prompted by the crisis in Flint, Mich. That testing found 25 sinks and water fountains at 12 schools measured at a lead level at or higher than the acceptable limit of 15 parts per billion. 

For Democratic gubernatorial candidate Colin Van Ostern, two New Hampshire employers – Stonyfield Farm and Southern New Hampshire University -- figure heavily in his message to voters. NHPR’s Jason Moon reports on what Van Ostern’s time at these companies might tell us about how he’d operate as governor.

Natasha Haverty

Vermont senator and former presidential contender Bernie Sanders spent Labor Day in New Hampshire.

New research says an overwhelming majority of New Hampshire residents support paid family leave and medical leave insurance.

The survey found 88 percent of women and 76 percent of men support a law establishing a paid family leave and medical leave insurance program in the state.

Mark Connolly

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Connolly says he’s back in for an upcoming debate on WMUR TV, after labor dispute negotiations at the station showed signs of progress.

Last week, Mark Connolly had cited the dispute between the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 1228 and WMUR, when he said he would not participate in a debate scheduled for this Tuesday.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The campaigns of two people hoping to get on New Hampshire's presidential ballot made progress toward that goal this week.

Josue Mendivil via Flickr CC

State tourism officials expect this Labor Day weekend to be a busy one. Kris Nielsen with the division of travel and tourism says visitors are projected to spend $88 million here between now and Monday night.

"It's predicted to be the busiest labor day weekend on record. In fact we are expecting about 620,000 people to visit from out of state during the three day holiday that actually represents a 5 percent increase over last year."

Happy (almost) long weekend! Before you leave the office, catch up on some of the stories you might've missed from the last week — you might pick up a few conversation starters for any Labor Day picnics you have on the agenda. To get this rundown delivered right to your inbox, make sure to sign up for NHPR's newsletters right here.

You might already be overwhelmed by the number of TV ads about this year's U.S. Senate race between Kelly Ayotte and Maggie Hassan.  And if you're like a lot of people, you're confused about who's paying for all these 30-second commercials, and why.

Before you tune it out completely, here's a video guide to navigating the political advertising - and money - behind this important race.

 A substance-abuse treatment advocate who appeared in a political ad criticizing Gov. Maggie Hassan's handling of the state's drug crisis has resigned from the nonprofit she once led.

Melissa Crews stepped down from the board of HOPE for New Hampshire Recovery earlier this week, according to the Concord Monitor.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

At thirteen miles in length, New Hampshire has the shortest coastline of any US state (excluding those with no coast at all). But what it lacks in distance, it makes up for in vibrancy. As part of our series Life on the Seacoast, I traveled the full length of NH's coast, along Highway Route 1, stopping each mile to document the happenings and the habitats on the way.

Click here to view the photo essay in its entirety.

Robert Taylor via Flickr

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

Courtesy photo

Residents in the town of Troy are trying to figure out what to do with an unexpected windfall.

When former resident Betty Giorgianni died at the age of 90 earlier in April, she left the town a gift of $821,500.

For a large city, that might be a drop in the bucket, but for this community of about 2,000 people in the southwest corner of New Hampshire, it’s a big deal.

The gift amounts to roughly half of the town’s overall annual budget.

Tom Matson is chairman of the Troy Board of Selectmen. He joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the gift.

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