News

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire has received more than $1.3 million in federal aid to help offset the costs of coping with a severe snowstorm in January.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency says the state received the disaster relief funds in connection with the Jan. 26-28 storm that buried parts of the state under two-to-three feet of snow.

Gov. Maggie Hassan pegs costs of snow removal in the southern three counties of Strafford, Rockingham and Hillsborough at about $3.3 million during that storm alone.

H.A. Kimball

The way New Hampshire cares for people with mental illness and developmental disabilities has changed dramatically over the past 200 years.

The shifts in approach have been urged on by advances in drugs and science, legislative mandate, budget cuts, and the force of media and popular culture.

Just 25 years ago, New Hampshire was a national leader in caring for people with mental and physical disabilities. Today, the state ranks closer to the bottom, and New Hampshire is in the middle of a period of dramatic change.

Courtesy Todd Burdette

It was nearly a year ago that widespread abuse at Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham came to light. Now, Lakeview is shutting down.

The facility is a treatment center for people with brain injuries and intellectual disabilities. And as New Hampshire faces a future without Lakeview, families and state regulators are deciding where to send people with highly challenging behaviors. 

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

  

An eastern New Hampshire medical center has agreed to pay over $450,000 after an audit revealed one of its hospitals was improperly collecting from a federal health care insurance program.

The Valley News reports Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center agreed to pay the Medicare program after the audit estimated that one of its hospitals wrongly collected $1.4 million from the program in 2011 and 2012.

Geoff Forester/Concord Monitor

Neighborhood diners have been a staple campaign visit in New Hampshire for decades. They offer easy access to voters, a wide-range of age groups and personable settings. The Corner View Restaurant in Concord is one of the many popular stops candidates make on the campaign diner tour. 

In 1989, NHPR humanities reporter Robbie Honig profiled The Golgonooza Letter Foundry & Press. This small shop in the village of Ashuelot was opened by two poets from Boston who shared a passion for letterpress printing.

“We started with making type for ourselves, for our own poetry books," said Golgonooza co-founder Julia Ferrari. "But also, making a living by making books for other people too. We didn’t want to just go out and have to work somewhere else and then come back and do our art. We felt that if we could possibly do our art at the same time, we would be learning how to get better at what we did.”

By 1989, the shop was producing artisanal books that fetched up to thousands of dollars apiece.

Keep reading after the story for my conversation with Julia. But first, from the archives this week, here’s Honig's report from the Golgonooza Letter Foundry & Press in 1989.


Josh Rogers/NHPR

Republican John Kasich appears to be picking up steam in NH. The Ohio governor is climbing in the presidential polls,  and drawing growing crowds. At the Derry VFW hall  Wednesday, Kasich told his audience leadership is hard, and requires help from voters.

krpoliticaljunkie.com

As anyone with a calculator or a newspaper knows, there are 17 candidates for the Republican presidential nomination.  On the Democratic side, it’s a much more manageable number.  Five are in the race to be their party’s standard bearer.  (Six, if Vice President Joe Biden, who is said to be contemplating a race, gets in.)  In any case, the number works for one debate stage.

But why so few Democrats?  

Hikers on Franconia Ridge
Jeff Pang / Flickr

A 17-year-old Massachusetts hiker died Tuesday after falling into Franconia Falls in Lincoln.

Emergency crews searched for Julia Hassan of Lowell for four hours before recovering her body.

Crews from Lincoln and Woodstock along were joined by Fish and Game officers in the search.

ronmerk / Morguefile

A Merrimack County Superior Court Judge has ordered the closure of the Veterans Museum of New Hampshire and ordered its president, Henry T. Pratte, to pay a $10,000 dollar fine.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte is urging the Health and Human Services secretary to work with the state to ease costly requirements for some residential drug treatment centers to obtain a health care facility license.

She said recent reports indicate that stringent licensing requirements could force several centers to cut the number of available beds and reduce their ability to serve people dealing with substance abuse issues.

Ayotte said this is a serious concern in light of state's heroin and prescription drug addiction crisis.

Tamara Keith / NPR

Hillary Clinton made a campaign stop in Keene yesterday to discuss what she has called a "quiet epidemic" in New Hampshire, substance abuse.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire was the first state to expressly prohibit ballot selfies.

The logic was that allowing people to prove how they voted could lead to vote buying or coercion.

The federal court found those interests insufficient to ban what amounted to political speech. 

GaborfromHungary / Morguefile

When babies are born sick or underweight, they’re often moved to neonatal intensive care units. A new study by the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice has found that admission rates for to intensive care units, or NICUs, are increasing for newborns of all weights. That's raising questions about whether babies are receiving expensive medical care they do not need. 

NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with Wade Harrison, the lead author of this study.

Audio will be available after 6 p.m., Tuesday, August 11, 2015.

Cheryl Senter/NHPR

While Republican candidates for president have so far logged two debates (and one forum) this election cycle, Democrats are arguing over the timing and number of their own primary debates.

Flickr

 

Officials say several beachgoers had to be assisted by lifeguards at a New Hampshire beach due to strong rip currents.

Lifeguards helped 18 people Monday at Hampton Beach. No one was injured.

Beach Patrol Captain Pat Murphy tells WMUR-TV swimmers were only allowed up to their waists at the beach due to the strong currents.

Lifeguards have helped 160 people in the water at Hampton Beach so far this season.

Officials say they are monitoring conditions for Tuesday.

Twitter/michellecoutur3

The Manchester Board of School Committee took a vote of 'no confidence' in Mayor Ted Gatsas at a meeting Monday night, according to the New Hampshire Union Leader.

The 10-2 vote comes after Gatsas vetoed a three-year contract with city teachers.

School board members also asked aldermen to reconsider their vote on the agreement, and urged Gatsas, who chairs the school board, to recuse himself from a reconsideration vote.

Via WeirsBeach.com

 

A $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation program will fund a four-year study examining the future of dams in New England.

The grant was announced Monday by the University of New Hampshire. Paul Kirshen, a research professor of civil and environmental engineering at the university, will lead the project.

Jim Cole / AP Photo POOL

At a ceremony at the Statehouse Tuesday, Governor Maggie Hassan will sign a bill into law that requires those convicted of violent crimes to appear in court for victim impact statements.

New Hampshire will be the first state to have such a requirement.

The bill was filed after convicted murderer Seth Mazzaglia initially refused to appear in court to hear victim impact statements read by friends and family of his victim, Lizzi Marriott.

Mazzaglia ultimately withdrew his motion, and appeared for the hearing. He received a mandatory life sentence.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

With the state’s budget stalemate now in its second month, the impacts of the current stopgap spending plan are starting to come into view. But because it’s been a dozen years since the state last found itself in this situation, navigating these budgetary waters is proving a challenge -- both for state agencies and for those who rely on their services.

josh rogers/nhpr

Hillary Clinton told a crowd at Exeter high school she wants students to be able to attend public colleges and universities without taking out loans. 

She said she’d create incentives for states to spend more on education and for colleges to control their spending. And she wants to allow people carrying student debt to refinance.

Public Domain

In 1870, Marilla Ricker, an attorney from Dover, attempted to cast a ballot in an election, but she was turned away. She tried again every year for the next five decades and was either refused or had her ballot destroyed. Ricker died in 1920, shortly after women won the right to vote. 

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Former Democratic congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter has filed paperwork clearing the way for another shot at the seat she lost in 2014.

All eyes have been on the District 1 seat since the Federal Elections Commission ruled earlier this spring that embattled Republican incumbent Frank Guinta had accepted an illegal campaign contribution from his parents.

bakedbyrachel.com

Mack’s Apples Farm in Londonderry is changing ownership to the next generation of the Mack family.

Owner Andrew C. Mack says he’s passing on the farm to his son, Andrew Mack Jr. and his wife Carol Mack.

This will be the eighth generation of the Mack family to run the farm, going back to 1732.

It’s the oldest family-run farm in New Hampshire.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

A medical marijuana dispensary is being proposed in Plymouth.

Sanctuary ATC of Salem filed the application with the town, which will be the subject of an Aug. 17 public hearing at Plymouth Town Hall.

Under the state’s medical marijuana law passed in 2013, local zoning approval is required before opening up shop.

New Hampshire was the last New England state to legalize medical marijuana, and there have been delays in implementing the law.

Via Flickr CC

Gas prices may continue to fall in New Hampshire for much of the rest of 2015.

The latest survey of gas prices from GasBuddy.com Sunday showed a median price of $2.53 per gallon. That’s 6 cents per gallon cheaper than prices of a week ago, and 17 cents per gallon below those of a month ago.

The state Department of Transportation is set to begin work Monday on replacing a bridge on Route 26 in Millsfield.

DOT engineer Andy Hall says the bridge over Clear Stream has been showing signs of wear.

“We’re going to repair some undermining underneath the wing walls of the bridge,” Hall says. “Then we’re going to remove the bridge, a half at a time, the top of it, and put back new beams and a new bridge deck.”

The work is expected to continue through November. There will be one-way alternating traffic directed by temporary signals throughout the project.

<a href=”http://www.401kcalculator.org”>401k</a> via Flickr

  Several hundred New Hampshire residents are receiving refunds from tax preparer H&R Block over what the state calls erroneous charges.

The Attorney General’s office found a case in which H&R Block had charged a consumer to prepare a business and profits tax return that was neither needed nor filed. 

ep_jhu

The North Country Health Consortium’s offers a Youth Leadership Through Adventure program, serving kids in Coos and Grafton County. The program helps middle and high schools to create a healthy culture, develop leadership skills and avoid alcohol and other drugs. Tony Bolash is a student at Gorham High School, where students named the group “Inspire.”

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Campaigning in Seabrook, Republican Jeb Bush says he did fine in Thursday’s GOP presidential debate. But Bush also appeared to have his reservations about the FOX News debate.

Pages