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Todd Bookman/NHPR

The Exeter UFO Festival is again drawing in experts in extraterrestrial sightings, abductions, as well those just curious about what may be out there.

This weekend marks the 8th edition of the Festival, which features two days of speakers, along with vendors and UFO tours.

In 1965, two Exeter policemen, along with others, had a famous encounter with a red orb just across the town’s border in Kensington. After that sighting drew national attention, Exeter became known as the ‘Roswell of the East,’ at least in certain circles.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The Hopkinton State Fair kicked off Friday - its 102nd year.

Allegra Boverman

Renaissance-style frescoes are rare in this country. Yet one hangs on a wall in Nashua’s community theater.

At the Court Street building, summer campers dance and run through the hallways. The room is jammed and the kids barely notice the mural with its bright sun shining on Main Street icons, parks and river-ways.

Ben Henry for NHPR

A group of Indonesians in New Hampshire who are facing deportation went before federal immigration officials Friday in Manchester. Many have lived illegally in the US for years under the supervision of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), but are now encountering tightened immigration policies under President Trump.

NHPR Staff

It's been fourteen years since the Old Man of the Mountain collapsed, but New Hampshire residents are still used to seeing him all over the state. One of listeners is asking, "Why?"

As part of our series Only in NH, in which we answer questions from around the state about New Hampshire oddities, producer Taylor Quimby tries to get to the bottom of that question.

New Hampshire is once again trying to be the first state to get federal approval to add work requirements to its Medicaid expansion program. This comes a year after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rejected a similar request — albeit under a different administration.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A federal oversight agency’s review of how New Hampshire is spending $18 million in federal election money finds that the state, for the most part, follows the rules. But the back-and-forth within the audit illuminates a larger and long-running tension between the New Hampshire Secretary of State’s office and the federal elections officials.

Courtesy

The back-and-forth between Dartmouth faculty and College President Phil Hanlon continues over the school's response to comments by Mark Bray. Bray is a faculty member and has been a prominent speaker on the Antifa movement since the clashes in Charlottesville.

In a statement last month, President Hanlon distanced the college from Bray's comments around the role of violence in taking on white supremacy.

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

The fall hunting season is now underway across the state. Starting Friday, hunting is open for black bears, Canada geese and gray squirrels. Deer and turkey season begins later this autumn.

New Hampshire Fish and Game officials have set a target population for black bears at just under 5,000. This year, they estimate there are more than 6,000 in the state. That means hunting restrictions will be fairly liberal -- good odds for those heading out to the woods.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Tony Strat stands in the grass outside his screen-printing studio in the Upper Valley, washing the ink off of used screens with a hose. Even though he’s scrubbed the screens down, shadows of  designs he’s printed are still visible. “Gender is a social construct,” one of them reads.

Strat, 26, is an artist, entrepreneur and athlete. He’s worked in finance and started his own skateboarding company. He's also transgender. He started his transition process last year.

FILE

A controversial bill to reform food stamp eligibility drew opposition earlier this year, in part, after revelations it was being pushed by an out-of-state think tank on a nationwide campaign to reform welfare systems. It was shelved back in April but, after a Thursday work session, is now poised to get a second look from lawmakers. 

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan says the office is reevaluating its guidance to cities and towns after “handwritten confidential, non-public information” was found in the public voter checklists of more than 40 New Hampshire communities.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

New Hampshire is the Granite State...we like our landscapes and our people to be tough. But New Hampshire is also known for its beauty, our forests and mountains. Our trails, fields, and cold-water coastline.

What this state isn’t known for are its islands. But today, we’re changing that.

With the end of summer rapidly approaching we're dedicating this episode of The Exchange entirely to the islands of New Hampshire. We’ve got stories from the Seacoast and the Lakes Region to the North Country. Stories of camps, boats, warring lobstermen, and inescapable beauty.

Listen to the episode:


Franklin Pierce University is offering free tuition, room, and board for the fall semester to up to 20 college students displaced by Hurricane Harvey.

Linda Quimby, vice president of enrollment at Franklin Pierce, says the move is meant, in part, to send a message to current students about moral leadership.

“We do think it sends a powerful message. And we also feel that it’s a way that Franklin Pierce can best reach out to individuals who may be impacted by the storm.”

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

High schoolers in the town of Northwood now have busses to take them to school again. But the town is still struggling to find drivers for elementary students.

Vermont Senator and former presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders will make two stops in the state on Labor Day.

Sanders will start his day with a speech at the annual AFL-CIO breakfast in Manchester. The event, hosted by the New Hampshire chapter of the country’s largest labor union, will also feature New Hampshire Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan, and Representative Annie Kuster.

Later that morning, Sanders will speak at an event at Rollins Park in Concord hosted by the progressive group Rights and Democracy NH.

Jason Moon - NHPR

Schools in Portsmouth started a bit later this week—at 8:20 a.m. instead of 7:30 a.m. The idea is that if kids are allowed to sleep later, they’ll be better prepared to learn once they get to school. Schools in the towns of Durham, Madbury, and Lee as well as the Inter-Lakes School District in the Laconia area also are starting late this year.

Steve Zadravec is superintendent of Portsmouth's schools. He’s been a supporter of these later start times. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Courtesy of FACEBOOK

Communities across New Hampshire are holding vigils Thursday evening to honor the hundreds of lives lost in the state's drug epidemic. 

Courtesy of the DOT

Officials at the Department of Transportation are fast-tracking inspections on 16 of the state’s “red listed” bridges. That's after a piece of concrete fell off one of the bridges over I-93 in Derry on Monday.

Animal Planet

North Woods Law: New Hampshire’ is back for another season.

The reality show follows a group of New Hampshire Fish & Game conservation officers in the line of duty; that includes everything from rescues in the White Mountains, to patrolling the seacoast.

The second season premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. on Animal Planet.

Col. Kevin Jordan from N.H. Fish & Game joined NHPR’s Morning Edition to talk about the show.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Off the coast of New Hampshire are the iconic Isles of Shoals.

Somewhere around the middle of those isles is a dotted line -- the state border between New Hampshire and Maine.

As part of our series Surrounded in which we look at life in and around New Hampshire's islands, Jason Moon found out that line has been the cause of some intense disagreement over the years.

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

Bus driver shortages in New Hampshire have forced one school district to delay the start to the school year.

WMUR-TV reports elementary and middle school students in Wakefield will start Sept. 11, a week later than scheduled. School business administrator Terry Wiggin says the district has 14 bus routes but only three drivers.

High school students have been directed to report to the Paul School if they need bus transportation.

Peter Biello / NHPR

As the Manchester VA Medical Center continues to recover from catastrophic flooding, allegations of dangerous delays in veterans’ care, and unsanitary conditions, VA officials and a dozen whistleblowers are trying to chart the future of veterans’ healthcare in New Hampshire. It’s not clear what that will look like.

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

A former Dartmouth-Hitchcock doctor who had his license suspended earlier this year after faking medical records and diverting an opioid for his own use can now return to practice.

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine ruled earlier this month that Dr. Christopher Manfred can begin practicing medicine again pending certain conditions. Those include practicing only critical care medicine for the first year and agreeing to monitoring.

via the store's website

An Upper Valley business is reviving a fundraising campaign from the days of Hurricane Katrina to help with the current storm crisis in Texas. 

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Manchester and Laconia have seen a recent spike in drug overdoses but officials say it's not because there’s a new, stronger drug on the streets.

AP/Mark Duncan

Voters in a New Hampshire city will be able to determine whether the gambling game Keno should be played in restaurants and bars.

The state liquor store near the Portsmouth traffic circle is set to receive a major upgrade.

The new building will be double the size of the existing liquor store and will offer some 6,000 different sizes and varieties of wines and spirits.

Joseph Mollica is Chairman of the New Hampshire Liquor Commission. He says replacing the old building is expected to generate a 10 percent increase in sales.

“The selection just isn’t there and we’re missing the boat. It’s time to step it up and get that store done.”

Jack Rodolico

New Hampshire's attorney general is asking people to be cautious before donating to help those who are in need in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

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