Music News
12:53 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Requiem For A Cabaret: The Oak Room Closes

The entrance to the Algonquin Hotel on West 44th Street in New York City.
Peter Kramer Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 5:21 am

New York's historic Algonquin Hotel has been famous for a lot of things: the roundtable where some of the greatest American wits, from George S. Kaufman to Dorothy Parker, held forth in the 1920s and '30s; generations of cats — named either Hamlet or Matilda — who haunt the lobby; and, since 1980, the Oak Room, one of New York's most loved cabaret spaces.

When Marriott purchased the hotel and closed it for renovations early this year, they announced that the Oak Room would not be reopening — instead, it will be a lounge for preferred customers.

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Monkey See
12:53 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Character Makeovers And Our Summer TV Quiz

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NPR Story
12:39 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Paralyzed Rats Walk, Even Sprint After Rehab

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:18 pm

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a combination of therapies, willpower and chocolate helped rats with severe spinal cord injuries learn to walk and even run again. Neurobiologist Moses Chao, not affiliated with the study, discusses the rehab method and whether it could work in humans.

NPR Story
12:39 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Remembering A Son In 'Immortal Bird'

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:42 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. For the rest of the hour, a look at an extraordinary life and a heartbreaking loss. In his new memoir "Immortal Bird," Doron Weber takes us to the inner circle of his family, where we meet his son Damon, a smart, likeable, aspiring actor born with a congenital heart defect. At 16, Damon undergoes a heart transplant, and his short life ends not long after in the ICU of a hospital that, according to Doron, seemed to botch his care in multiple and unimaginable ways.

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NPR Story
12:39 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Can Technology Deliver Better Health Care?

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:35 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. If you have trouble sleeping, your doctor might send you to a sleep lab and spend $3,000 a night to chart your sleep cycle, or you could do the same thing at home with a commercially available headband, which wirelessly transmits your sleep data to your smartphone for under 100 bucks.

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The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Russia Is Not Propping Up Syrian Regime, Putin Says

President of Russia Vladimir Putin arrives for a meeting with German President Joachim Gauck, not seen, at Bellevue Palace in Berlin, Germany on Friday.
Markus Schreiber AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin denied claims made by Secretary of State Hilary Clinton that Russia is "in effect, propping up" the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

"We don't supply weapons that can be used in civil conflicts," Putin told reporters in Berlin after he met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

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Music Interviews
12:08 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

Why 'Edelweiss' Makes Audra McDonald Think Of Home

Audra McDonald is nominated for a Tony Award for her performance in The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess. She tells All Things Considered about the song that started her on her theater journey.
Michael Wilson

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 2:32 pm

A shelf stacked with LPs, a cassette played over and over on a family road trip, a song a parent always sang when vacuuming — these are ingredients of musical memories from childhood.

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World Cafe
11:46 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Lana Del Rey On World Cafe

Nicole Nodland

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 11:19 am

Lana Del Rey got her start at 18, when she was still known as Lizzy Grant and moved from Lake Placid to New York City to write songs and perform in clubs. In 2008, under her given name, she produced and released the EP Kill Kill independently. In 2010, her first album — the doubly eponymous Lana Del Ray [sic] a.k.a. Lizzy Grant — came out and was quickly pulled from circulation, though it'll be reissued this summer.

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Music Reviews
11:40 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Diamond Rugs: Carefully Constructed Drinking Tunes

Diamond Rugs.
Amie Ledford

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 1:11 pm

Diamond Rugs is one those bands that wants you to think it prizes spontaneity and sloppy good fun more than careful song construction and technical polish. And the album, also titled Diamond Rugs, almost succeeds in convincing you of its sloppy aesthetic, dispensing songs about drinking and carousing only to be left morose, in one's cups.

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Faith Matters
11:36 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Does Commitment To Faith Trump Loyalty To Law?

Pedro Hernandez was recently charged for the 1979 death of 6-year-old Etan Patz. The New York Times reports that Hernandez confessed to his Catholic prayer group in the 1980s, but no one went to authorities. Host Michel Martin explores the legal and religious aspects of confession with lawyer Daniel Van Ness and Father Robert Kaslyn.

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