World Cafe
5:38 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Next: Two Man Gentlemen Band

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 4:54 pm

  • Hear two new tracks from Two Man Gentleman Band

Self-described as "hot, raucous, retro swing for two," Two Man Gentlemen Band lives up to its claim. But, as the name suggests, there's a subtle ridiculousness to the group's sound. Andy Bean and Fuller Condon have made a career of recording old-school, '60s-style folk on vintage equipment, only to pack their songs with parodies, anachronisms and absurdities.

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It's All Politics
5:01 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Maine Independent Aims To Be Senate King, Acknowledges Potted Plant Potential

Former Maine Gov. Angus King speaks March 5 at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine.
Joel Page AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:57 pm

The most potentially influential politician you've probably never heard of, former two-term Maine Gov. Angus King, on Tuesday officially entered the race to replace retiring moderate GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe.

King, 68, an alternative-energy entrepreneur and supporter of President Obama, filed more than 6,000 signatures with Maine's secretary of state to ensure his place on November's ballot.

He'll run as an independent, as he did for his successful gubernatorial runs in the 1990s.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:59 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Small Change In Reading To Preschoolers Can Help Disadvantaged Kids Catch Up

Kimberly Payton, a teacher at the Small Savers Child Development Center, reads to a group of preschoolers in Washington, D.C., in 2010. Researchers say that teachers who make small changes in how they read to 4-year-olds can improve kids' reading skills later on.
Ricky Carioti The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:45 pm

On a recent Monday morning in Washington, D.C., a group of 3-year-old preschoolers bumbled their way into a circle, more or less, on the rug of their classroom. It was time to read.

The children sat cross-legged as their teacher, Mary-Lynn Goldstein, held high a book, Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus. There was a short conversation about pigeons, then, for reasons that weren't entirely clear, cows; and then Goldstein began to read. She read as most teachers read, occasionally stopping to ask a question, point out a picture or make a comment about the story.

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The Two-Way
4:52 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Facebook Stock Falls Another 9 Percent

Facebook's stock fell $3.07 to end the day at $28.84. That's first time it's fallen below $30 since the stock went public.

That price is also 24 percent below its opening price of $38.

The Wall Street Journal that the drop had to do with negative sentiment about the stock, as well as the fact that today traders were able to trade on derivatives.

The Facebook stock saw so much trading, the Journal reports, that it triggered Nasdaq's short sale circuit-breaker.

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Weather Alert
4:42 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Severe Storm Warnings in N.H.

Radar at 7:15 p.m.

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The National Weather Service says severe thunderstorm warnings for much of New Hampshire will remain in effect at least until 10 p.m.

The weather service reported hail the size of a quarter rained down on Alstead and area communities. The fast-moving storm is spreading from northeast from Cheshire County and western Merrimack County. There was a brief tornado watch just north of Keene, but that expired at 4:15 p.m.

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Shawn Johnson covers the State Capitol for Wisconsin Public Radio. Shawn joined the network in 2004. Prior to that he worked for WUIS-FM, a public radio station in Springfield, Illinois. There, Shawn reported on the Illinois legislature. He also managed the station's western Illinois bureau, where he produced features on issues facing rural residents. He previously worked as an Assistant Producer for WBBM-AM radio in Chicago.

Shawn's work has earned awards from the Associated Press and has been featured on National Public Radio.

608-263-4358

National Security
4:33 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Watching Big Brother: Privacy Board Delayed

Homeland Security analysts watch for threats to U.S. technological infrastructure at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:45 pm

Congress is considering legislation allowing the government to search through Internet traffic for early warnings of cyberattacks. The bills are controversial — worries about government surveillance have led to protests online.

The government does have a tool that could calm fears about this kind of legislation — it just doesn't use it.

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It's All Politics
4:32 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Even After Texas Primary, Romney Will Remain The 'Presumptive' Nominee

Mitt Romney campaigns Tuesday in Craig, Colo.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

At the moment the polls close in Texas Tuesday evening, most media outlets and very likely even the Mitt Romney campaign will declare that he has secured enough delegates to win the Republican nomination for president.

For what it's worth, there are two problems with that statement. First, as a practical matter, Romney actually won the Republican nomination when the other candidates competing for delegates in the primaries and caucuses stopped doing so. That was weeks ago.

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Politics
4:32 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Talk Of Union Rights Fades In Wis. Recall Election

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

There's just a week to go before Wisconsin holds a recall election for governor, only the third in U.S. history. Republican incumbent Scott Walker faces Democrat Tom Barrett, the mayor of Milwaukee. And while Democrats forced this election, it's Barrett who finds himself playing catch-up. Wisconsin public radio's Shawn Johnson has the story.

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Law
4:30 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Lawyers, Not Victims, Making Most In Madoff Cleanup

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 8:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You may recall that after Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff was found out, the Securities Investor Protection Corporation hired lawyer Irving Picard to be the bankruptcy trustee, to recover what he could for Madoff's victims. And for the past four years, Mr. Picard has been doing that. Not surprisingly, he and others involved in the recovery effort have been charging fees.

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