Award-winning science journalist Alison Richards is deputy supervising senior editor for NPR's science desk.

On a daily basis, she manages the desk's output of science, environmental and technical stories; edits Robert Krulwich’s pieces; and helps bring highlights of WNYC's Radiolab to Morning Edition.

Richards initiates major science features and series for NPR. She was the architect and lead editor of the year long “Climate Connections” series with National Geographic. In 2008, this global series was a finalist for the prestigious Grantham Prize and the National Academies Communication Award. In addition, Richards shared the top award in 2009 from the National Academies for the digital and multimedia presentation of this series.

Health
1:30 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

The Itching Question That's More Than Skin Deep

Studies show that the power of suggestion can induce itchiness — but scientists don't know what this irritation is, what causes it, or why it feels so good to cure. Marc Abrahams, editor of the Annals of Improbable Research, talks about how talking about the science of itches might have you scratching right now.

Planet Money
1:25 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

California's Facebook Windfall

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 11:21 am

Mark Zuckerberg is, among many other things, the highest-profile taxpayer on the planet today.

After today's Facebook IPO, Zuckerberg will owe nearly $200 million in California state taxes alone. That's "among the largest tax liabilities that a single individual has ever paid at a given point in time," says Jason Sisney of the California State Budget Legislative Analyst's Office.

Zuckerberg's profits will be taxed at a 10% rate in California. That's a much higher rate than in many other states.

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NPR Story
1:25 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

From Rooftops And Abandoned Lots, An Urban Harvest

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 1:53 pm

From rooftop apiaries in Paris to a vegetable-and-chicken farm in Philadelphia, agriculture has come to the city. Urban farmer Mary Seton Corboy and food writer Jennifer Cockrall-King talk about the future of food in the city. Plus, Tama Matsuoka Wong gives tasty tips for eating garden weeds.

NPR Story
1:25 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

On Eve Of Launch, SpaceX Head Talks About Mission

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

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The Salt
1:13 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Clarence Birdseye And His Fantastic Frozen Food Machine

Birdseye packed and froze his fish fillets in the patented cartons he developed
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 11:19 am

There's a particular pleasure in being reminded that the most ordinary things can still be full of magic. Frogs may turn into princes. Lumps of dirt can hide sparkling gems. And having just read Mark Kurlansky's new biography of Clarence Birdseye, I now see the humble fish fillet in a whole new light.

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Monkey See
12:58 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Pop Culture Happy Hour: TV Season Postmortem, Old People, Young People

NPR

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 3:35 pm

  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

On this week's Pop Culture Happy Hour, I am back from vacation and back at the table, and boy, was I glad to be there.

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It's All Politics
12:57 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Negative Coattails: Could Obama Cost Arkansas Democrats The Legislature?

Arkansas Senate President Paul Bookout, a Democrat, speaks in the Senate chamber at the Capitol in Little Rock on April 5. In November, Arkansans will vote for every seat in the state Legislature.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 3:53 pm

President Obama's performance in Tuesday's Arkansas primary won't be as embarrassing as what happened in West Virginia two weeks ago, when he gave up 41 percent of the vote to someone who happened to be sitting in a federal prison in Texas for embezzlement.

But it may well do more lasting damage to his party.

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It's All Politics
12:49 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

'President Romney's' First Day In Office: All About Reversing Obama Per Ad

Romney "Day One" ad

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 1:23 pm

Challenging an incumbent president means finding ways to narrow the stature gap between the Oval Office occupant and would-be president.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

House Approves Continuation Of Indefinite Detention For Terror Suspects

A unlikely coalition failed to derail the government's practice of holding terror suspects for indefinite periods of time.

Some Democrats and Tea Party Republicans put the issue to a vote through an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act that would have ended the practice but it ultimately failed, today, in the GOP-controlled house by a vote of 238 to 182.

The AP reports:

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