Around the Nation
5:18 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Detroit, Ontario Discuss Building Second Bridge

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 7:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Every day more than a quarter billion dollars worth of goods passing over a single U.S. border crossing - the Ambassador Bridge - which stretches across the Detroit River, from Detroit to Canada. U.S. and Canadian officials say traffic jams on that bridge are hampering the flow of international commerce and they say a second major crossing from Ontario to Detroit is needed. The question, now, is who would control that bridge. We have a report from Quinn Klinefelter of WDET.

(SOUNDBITE OF HORN HONKING)

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NPR correspondent Alix Spiegel works on the Science desk and covers psychology.

Arriving at NPR in 2003, much of Spiegel's reporting has been on emotion mental health. She has reported on everything from the psychological impact of killing another person, to the emotional devastation of Katrina, to psycho-therapeutic approaches to transgender children.

Author Interviews
3:37 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Caro's 'Passage of Power': LBJ's Political Genius

Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:26 am

Robert Caro writes obsessively about power. Fittingly, it's Lyndon Johnson — catapulted suddenly into the presidency "in the crack of a gunshot" — who consumes him.

The Passage of Power, the fourth volume of Caro's massive biography of Lyndon Johnson, is released this week. Caro has dedicated decades to meticulously researching Johnson's life, and the previous books in the series have been almost universally hailed as a significant achievement in American letters.

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Opinion
3:36 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Living To 100: The Story Of India's Pocket Hercules

Centenarian Manohar Aich sits at his home in Kolkata, India. Aich stood 4 feet 11 inches at his tallest, earning him the nickname "Pocket Hercules."
Bishan Samaddar

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 8:39 am

A fad that has been sweeping through middle-class India might look familiar to some Americans — it's a craze for fancy gym equipment. But when commentator Sandip Roy visited India's first Mr. Universe (who is known as the "Pocket Hercules") he found that the body builder has little patience for the new trend.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:35 am
Mon April 30, 2012

To Predict Dating Success, The Secret's In The Pronouns

People who are interested in and paying close attention to each other begin to speak more alike, a psychologist says.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 11:17 pm

On a recent Friday night, 30 men and 30 women gathered at a hotel restaurant in Washington, D.C. Their goal was love, or maybe sex, or maybe some combination of the two. They were there for speed dating.

The women sat at separate numbered tables while the men moved down the line, and for two solid hours they did a rotation, making small talk with people they did not know, one after another, in three-minute increments.

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Asia
3:34 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Drama Amid Indonesia's Disappearing Mangroves

A man gathering firewood to sell cuts down mangrove trees in the coastal area of Medan city on Indonesia's Sumatra island on Jan. 31. The country, which has one-quarter of the world's mangroves, is losing them at a rate of 6 percent a year. The coastal forests play important ecological and environmental roles.
Suntanta Aditya AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 7:36 am

The rising tide laps at the feet of local children and fishermen and submerges all but the tops of the mangrove trees of Tiwoho village in Indonesia's North Sulawesi province. At one degree of latitude north of the equator, the climate here is about the same all year round: hot, wet and perfect for the forests of salt-tolerant trees that grow along sheltered coastlines.

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Election 2012
3:32 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Romney's Big-Dollar 'Bundlers' Stay Anonymous

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greets supporters in Aston, Pa., on April 23.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:07 am

Every presidential nominee going back to 2000 has revealed the names of influential supporters known as "bundlers" because of the way they persuade others to give money to a candidate. Every nominee, that is, until Mitt Romney.

The most anyone can give directly to any presidential campaign is $5,000, and everyone who gives that much is listed in the Romney campaign's monthly disclosures.

When it comes to the bundlers, though, the campaign chooses to keep those names secret.

Voluntary Disclosure

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Education
3:31 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Economy Puts Value Of Liberal Arts Under Scrutiny

Wellesley College English professor Yoon Lee teaches a class on the rise of the novel.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:47 am

As high school seniors wrestle with big decisions before Tuesday's deadline about which college they want to go to, some of the nation's top liberal arts colleges are dealing with big decisions of their own. Many of the most elite private schools are trying to figure out how they may have to adapt at a time when they're seen as a more expensive — and less direct — path to landing a job.

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Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Asia
3:30 am
Mon April 30, 2012

Trade, Security On Agenda For Obama, Japan's Noda

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda speaks during a reception at the Japanese Embassy in Washington on Sunday. Noda meets with President Obama at the White House on Monday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 30, 2012 10:09 am

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda are meeting at the White House on Monday — the first such meeting between U.S. and Japanese leaders in three years.

Political turmoil in Japan has led to a constant turnover in leadership: There have been six prime ministers in as many years.

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