Word of Mouth
11:26 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Throw The Book At Them

Photo by Haven't The Slightest via Flickr Creative Commons

Imagine the Olympics with no gold medal…the prom without a queen...Top Model without a Top Model. Much of the literary world is bereft after the Pulitzer Prize board snubbed the fiction category in this year’s awards. It’s the first time since 1977 that the 'Lords of lit' deemed no book worthy of the honor.

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Word of Mouth
11:07 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Breaking Down the Brain

Scientists at the University of Illinois report that they have mapped the physical architecture of the brain with accuracy never before achieved. Their study, published in Brain: A Journal of Neurology is the largest, most comprehensive analysis so far of the brain structures vital to general intelligence –which depends on a remarkably circumscribed neural system – and to specific cognitive functions, like memory, self-control and recognizing speech. 

Get it?

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Word of Mouth
10:56 am
Thu April 19, 2012

So Percussion: Beyond the Beat

So Percussion, a New York-based quartet, brings an epic approach to the backbeat. 

We speak with members Adam Silwinski and Eric Beach in advance of their show at The Hop at Dartmouth College. 

 

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Africa
10:26 am
Thu April 19, 2012

After Decades Away, Tourists Return To Liberia

The 150 passengers aboard the National Geographic Explorer cruise ship arrive in Monrovia, the Liberian capital, on April 16. It's reportedly the largest group of tourists to visit the country since the 1970s.
Tamasin Ford for NPR

Liberia has been better known for conflict than tourism the past couple of decades.

But this week, a group of 150 tourists, many of them Americans, arrived for a brief stay in the small nation on Africa's West Coast. When their cruise liner docked in the capital of Monrovia, they became the largest group of tourists to visit the country in many years, probably since the 1970s.

Dock workers in Monrovia usually unload cargo ships full of secondhand clothes or rice — not a cruise ship full of American tourists.

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Books
10:15 am
Thu April 19, 2012

'Boys On The Bus': 40 Years Later, Many Are Girls

Reporters surround Sens. George McGovern (left) and Hubert Humphrey after a Democratic presidential debate in 1972.
George Brich AP

The news business has changed a lot in recent years, and that's especially true of political news. But when you ask about a book that captures what it's like to report on a presidential campaign, one decades-old classic still rules: The Boys on the Bus by Timothy Crouse.

The rough-and-tumble account of the reporters who covered President Richard Nixon's re-election against George McGovern back in 1972 is part of a Morning Edition series on political history.

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Latin America
9:49 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Cruise Ship Didn't Aid Drifting Boat, Passengers Say

Bird-watcher Jeff Gilligan snapped this photograph of a small boat in distress. Gilligan and others say the cruise ship he was traveling on did not stop to help the stricken craft.
Jeff Gilligan

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 5:09 pm

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Elizabeth Shogren is an NPR News Science Desk correspondent focused on covering environment and energy issues and news.

Since she came to NPR in 2005, Shogren's reporting has covered everything from the damage caused by the BP oil spill on the ecology of the Gulf Coast, to the persistence of industrial toxic air pollution as seen by the legacy of Tonawanda Coke near Buffalo, to the impact of climate change on American icons like grizzly bears.

NPR News
9:45 am
Thu April 19, 2012

How A 'Western Problem' Led To New Drilling Rules

Oil field workers drill into the Gypsum Hills near Medicine Lodge, Kan., on Feb. 21. The Environmental Protection Agency announced new rules Wednesday to control the problem of air pollution coming from wells being drilled by the booming oil and natural gas drilling industry.
Orlin Wagner AP

The Environmental Protection Agency's new air pollution rules for the oil and gas industry may seem like odd timing, as President Obama has been trying to deflect Republican criticism that he overregulates energy industries. But the rules weren't the Obama administration's idea.

Several years ago, communities in Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming complained about air pollution from natural gas booms in their local areas.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Commissioner George Bald

We sit down with George Bald, Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development.  We’ll talk about his agency’s efforts to attract tourists and new businesses, as well as its adoption of a new tourism slogan: "Live Free and..."

 

 

 

 

 

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Around the Nation
8:52 am
Thu April 19, 2012

Alleged $30M Theft By Comptroller Stuns Ill. City

This November 2011 photo provided by The American Quarter Horse Journal shows Rita Crundwell of Dixon, Ill., at the 2011 American Quarter Horse Association World Championship Show in Oklahoma City. FBI agents arrested Crundwell, the Dixon comptroller, on charges she misappropriated more than $30 million since 2006 to finance a lavish lifestyle.
AP

The top financial official for the small city of Dixon, Ill., is accused of stealing more than $30 million from city coffers over the past six years. It's a staggering amount of money for the city of just 15,000 residents in northwest Illinois, and federal prosecutors allege she used the funds to finance a lavish lifestyle that included horse farms and a $2 million luxury motor home.

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