Folk Show
9:50 pm
Wed January 25, 2012

NHPR Folk Show Playlist 1.22.12

Song/Artist/Album/Label

Sweet Afton/Nickel Creek/Nickel Creek/Sugar Hill

Hit 'em up style/Carolina Chocolate Drops/Genuine negro jig/   

Someday Soon/ David Wilcox/The FolkScene Collection/Red House Records

See Me Now/Meg Hutchinson/The Living Side/Red House Records

Fashioned In The Clay/Susie Burke And David Surette/When The Small Birds Sweetly Sing/Madrina Music

Slave's Lament/Atlantic Crossing/Wind Against the Tide/Atlantic Crossing

The Loving Kind/Nanci Griffith/Songs From Sing Out! V.53#4/www.singout.org

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NH News
5:49 pm
Wed January 25, 2012

House Hears Bill To Allow Students To Drop Any Class

The New Hampshire House is considering a plan to allow students replace any two public school courses with courses designed and taught by a parent or their designee. 

Under the bill, schools couldn’t veto subjects or teaching methods of parents but would have to grant students credits toward graduation. The measure’s sponsor, JR Hoell of Dunbarton, says the proposal affords parents a needed bit of freedom.

“Parents are taking a greater role in overseeing the academic progress of their children; the school system is taking a reduced role.”

 

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Among New Hampshire’s regions, the heavily-forested North Country—encompassing the Great North Woods and White Mountains regions—stands out as the most economically challenged.  Employment and wages have been in decline over the decades as the North Country’s traditional industries–paper mills and other wood products manufactur

NH News
5:09 pm
Wed January 25, 2012

Senate Passes Tighter Eminent Domain Rules

The New Hampshire Senate has voted to strengthen the rules for taking private property by eminent domain. But there are questions as to what the wording of the final Senate bill really means.

Mark McCulloch lives in North Stratford, way up North on the Vermont-New Hampshire Border.

His house is smack in the middle of the route for the hydro-electric transmission project, Northern Pass, the 180 mile transmission line that would bring electricity from Canada to New England.

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The Lakes Region covers a goodly portion of central New Hampshire, including all of Belknap County along with parts of Carroll, Grafton,  and Merrimack Counties.

Unlike some other parts of New Hampshire, it’s hard to capture an overarching picture of the Monadnock region through economic and demographic information.  In fact, looking at US Census numbers, both Cheshire and

The Merrimack Valley follows the Merrimack River, straddling part of southern New Hampshire and a swath of northeast Massachusetts, including the cities of Lowell, Haverhill, and Lawrence.  Residents on both sides of the border refer to their areas as “the Merrimack Valley,” but technically the Massachusetts side is considered the “Lower Merrimack Valley,” while the New Hampshire portion is the “Upper Merrimack Valley” (not to be confused with the “Upper Valley” in the Dartmouth-Sunapee region).

At 18 miles long, New Hampshire has the shortest shoreline in America.  But for centuries, this small strip of land has been the heart of the state’s Seacoast region.

Measuring around 18 miles long, New Hampshire has the smallest shoreline of all coastal states.  But for about 400 years, it’s been enough to support small boat fishermen in the Seacoast region.  They make their livings cruising New England’s waters for cod, lobster, shrimp and other stocks.

Some Facts About New Hampshire’s Infrastructure:

New Hampshire has approximately 17,000 miles of state and town roads, turnpikes and interstate highways. There are 3,795 bridges in the state. As of 2010, the New Hampshire Department of Transportation plowed more than 800 lane miles of roads and put down 180,000 tons of salt for snow and ice control annually.

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