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The Two-Way
8:46 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Minnie Miñoso, Major League Baseball's First Black Latino Star, Dies

Minnie Miñoso smiles in front of a sculpture of him before throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at U.S. Cellular Field. Major League Baseball's first black Latino star, Miñoso died March 1, 2015.
Nam Y Huh AP

Major league baseball legend Minnie Miñoso, known as the Cuban Comet and Mr. White Sox, has died. Miñoso, who hailed from Havana, Cuba, played 12 of his 17 seasons with the Chicago White Sox, after getting his start in the majors with the Cleveland Indians in 1949.

The left fielder hit 135 homers and 808 RBIs for the White Sox. His number 9 was retired by the team in 1983, and today there's a statue of Miñoso at the field where the White Sox play.

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Television
8:37 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

'Battle Creek' Tries To Shake Up CBS' Cop Show Formula

Dean Winters, left, and Josh Duhamel are not your father's mismatched buddy cops, on the new CBS show Battle Creek.
CBS

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 10:20 pm

In the first scene of CBS' Battle Creek, Det. Russ Agnew has a problem. A listening device he wants to place on his snitch Teddy isn't working.

"What wrong with the wire ... why isn't the red light coming on?" asks Agnew, beating the transmitter against the side of his van. He's already pilfered a handheld camera from a father videotaping his kid's performance at a school play because the department couldn't get him a working video unit.

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Movie Interviews
6:07 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Most Vibrant Year For Cinematographer Bradford Young

In Selma, director of photography Bradford Young wanted the camera to feel like a participant. "It was just about never retreating, always staying dangerously close to Martin Luther King," he says.
Atsushi Nishijima Paramount Pictures

Just two months into 2015, cinematographer Bradford Young is already having a big year.

Two acclaimed movies, Selma and A Most Violent Year, bear his name as Director of Photography.

"It's an interesting time," he laughs.

He sat down for a chat with NPR's Arun Rath, who started by asking about the striking depictions of violence in Selma.

"You have to be very delicate," Young says, "because as much as film has the ability to raise humanity, it also has the ability to put us down."

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Politics
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Is Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's Washington Visit Playing In Israel?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

World
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

London's Homeless Line Up For Free Meals From Mobile Sikh Kitchen

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

The Brother Went To Fight Ebola. So Did His Sister. Mom Was 'A Wreck'

How do siblings get around the "no touching" rule during the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone? Alex and Jen Tran grabbed a rare hug when they were geared up for training.
Courtesy of Alex Tran

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 7:43 pm

When Alex Tran went off to Sierra Leone to work as an epidemiologist, his parents were worried. His mom was "a wreck," according to his sister Jen, who followed him into the Ebola hot zone a few weeks later.

Last fall as the Ebola outbreak raged in West Africa, Alex, 28, was working at USAID. Jen, who's a registered nurse, was deployed with the U.S. Navy on a ship in the Arabian Gulf. They both were itching to get to the front lines of the epidemic to help.

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Code Switch
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

How Pittsburgh's Freedom House Pioneered Paramedic Treatment

Freedom House paramedics, who first were deployed in the 1960s, provided a crucial service for Pittsburgh residents. The program became a national model for emergency medical transport and care.
Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh

In the 1960s, Pittsburgh, like most cities, was segregated by race. But people of all colors suffered from lack of ambulance care. Police were the ones who responded to medical emergency calls.

"Back in those days, you had to hope and pray you had nothing serious," recalls filmmaker and Hollywood paramedic Gene Starzenski, who grew up in Pittsburgh. "Because basically, the only thing they did was pick you up and threw you in the back like a sack of potatoes, and they took off for the hospital. They didn't even sit in the back with you."

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

A Standout Student, A Star At Goldman Sachs — And Undocumented

Julissa Arce's tourist visa expired when she was 14. She excelled in high school, college and at Goldman Sachs for years before she finally became a U.S. citizen.
Morrigan McCarthy for ELLE.com Courtesy Julissa Arce

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 7:58 pm

Julissa Arce was born in Mexico, and came to the United States on a tourist visa when she was 11. It expired a few years later — but Arce didn't leave. Instead, she excelled in high school and college, then secured a job at Goldman Sachs. Her ascent was dramatic: she rose quickly from analyst to associate to vice president.

But Arce was scared to go to work every day, worried that her undocumented status would be uncovered and she'd be escorted out.

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The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Kerry Tries To Calm Tensions Over Netanyahu Visit

Secretary of State John Kerry testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Wednesday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Secretary of State John Kerry, apparently hoping to patch a rift sparked by GOP lawmakers' decision to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress without first consulting the White House, says the administration doesn't want the speech to become a political football.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

Avalanches Kill Nearly 250 In Afghanistan

Survivors of an avalanche walk in the Abdullah Khil village of the Dara district of Panjshir province on Sunday. Nearly 200 people have been killed in north Afghanistan in some of the worst avalanches there for 30 years.
Omar Sobhani Reuters/Landov

Massive avalanches in a valley not far from the Afghan capital have reportedly killed nearly 200 people, adding to a total of almost 250 deaths from the worst such snow slides in three decades in the country's mountainous northeast.

Rescue workers using bulldozers worked to clear roads to the Panjshir Valley area just northeast of Kabul — an area where villagers have been cut off for almost a week.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Sun March 1, 2015

6 In 10 Young Republicans Favor Legal Marijuana, Survey Says

A user prepares to roll a marijuana cigarette on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes in the District of Colombia on Thursday.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 9:28 pm

Nearly two-thirds of Millennials who identify as Republican support legalizing marijuana, while almost half of older GOP Gen-Xers do, according to a recently released Pew survey that could be an indicator of where the debate is heading.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Venezuela Cuts American Embassy Staff, Restricts U.S. Travel

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro waves to supporters during a march in Caracas, Venezuela, on Saturday.
Xinhua/Landov

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in the country and restrictions on travel by U.S. citizens there –- as he accused Washington of "gringo" meddling.

The BBC reports:

"The president said that the US government had 100 employees working in Venezuela whereas Venezuela had 17 based in the US.

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The Two-Way
9:00 am
Sun March 1, 2015

ISS Spacewalkers Perform Tricky Cable, Antenna, Installation

Astronaut Terry Virts points to his helmet as he sits inside the International Space Station on Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 9:35 am

Astronauts at the International Space Station have ventured outside to perform a challenging cable installation on their orbiting platform.

Spacewalkers Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore have 400 feet of cable to install as well as two sets of antennas.

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Monkey See
8:57 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Will Forte Is 'The Last Man On Earth'

In the year 2020, a deadly virus has swept Earth. Phil Miller (Will Forte) is the only survivor.
Jordin Althaus FOX

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 10:41 am

Even were it not a strong show out of the gate, you'd have to give Fox's new comedy The Last Man On Earth, premiering Sunday night, at least this much: they know how to save on hiring extras.

Will Forte, a flexible and talented performer who's been looking for just the right thing since he left Saturday Night Live, did what a lot of people do now when they aren't getting the right opportunities: he wrote himself a television show.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Opposition Rally In Moscow To Mourn Boris Nemtsov

People hold flags and posters during a march to commemorate Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov, who was shot dead on Friday night.
Tatyana Makeyeva Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 9:23 am

Tens of thousands of people are gathering in the Russian capital to mourn Boris Nemtsov, the former deputy prime minister turned harsh critic of President Vladimir Putin who was gunned down on a Moscow street last week.

The march, originally scheduled to oppose Russian involvement in Ukraine, was to have been led by Nemtsov himself. Following his murder, however, the gathering has turned into a wake for the fallen opposition leader.

NPR's Corey Flintoff, reporting from the rally in Moscow, says the demonstration is peaceful.

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Health
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Coming To Terms With The Pressure Of Weight

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pop Culture
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Actor And Director Finds His Roots In Travel Writing

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Television
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

'The Last Man': An Odd Premise, Says Its Creator, But Oddly Relatable

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

After Delays, Jury Selection To Wrap Up In Boston Bombing Trial

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Who Fails To Pay Child Support? Moms, At A Higher Rate Than Dads

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

In Fourth Year Of Drought, Many Calif. Farms Won't Get Federal Water

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Strange News
8:08 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Watermelon Wedge Issue Ripens In Oklahoma

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 8:44 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
7:06 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Mr. Spock, Mixed-Race Pioneer

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock. The character's mixed Vulcan and human heritage set him apart from the rest of the Star Trek crew.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 3:17 pm

At a time when the mere sight of Petula Clark touching Harry Belafonte's arm held the potential to upset delicate sensibilities, the half-human, half-Vulcan character Mr. Spock embodied an identity rarely acknowledged, much less seen, on television: a mixed-race person.

Sure, the mixing of races was allegorical in Spock's case, as was the brilliantly subversive mode for social commentary on Star Trek. But that doesn't mean it didn't resonate.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

The Art Of Syrian Refugees Sends A Message. Is Anyone Listening?

In "Exile From One's Country," Mohammed Al-Amari captures the pain of a Syrian girl.
Courtesy of Mohammed Al Amari

When Syrian artist Mohammed Al-Amari, 27, fled the country's civil war last winter he couldn't carry much. Just some clothes, and little else, he says. But he did manage to bring some "colors" with him — watercolors, pastels and even a few of his paintings.

Al-Amari and his wife didn't want to leave their home in Daraa province in southwestern Syria. They stayed for the first three years of the war, but eventually moved from their village to another one that was further from the conflict.

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Pop Culture
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Mr. Spock And The Consolations Of Solitude

Spock was famously emotionless, but that didn't stop him from forming intense friendships with his shipmates, particularly Captain James T. Kirk.
NBCU Photo Bank

When I heard about the sad demise of Leonard Nimoy, I felt — and I'm certain I'm not alone here — a sense of loss and sadness entirely disproportionate to the death of someone I'd never met. Then again, what he meant to me in my youth — and again, I'm certain I'm not alone here — was also, perhaps, disproportionately significant.

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Shots - Health News
7:03 am
Sun March 1, 2015

How A Group Of Lung Cancer Survivors Got Doctors To Listen

Chris Newman, seen at her home in Los Molinos, Calif., calls the change she helped get made to lung cancer treatment guidelines a "small, but very important victory."
Courtesy of Chris Newman

A group of lung cancer survivors was chatting online last May about what they thought was a big problem: Influential treatment guidelines published by a consortium of prominent cancer centers didn't reflect an option that several people thought had saved their lives. They wanted to change that.

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The Salt
5:56 am
Sun March 1, 2015

Italian Cheese Lovers Find Their Bovine Match Through 'Adopt A Cow'

In exchange for a fee of 60 euros, members of Adopt A Cow get an assortment of aged and soft cheeses made from the milk of cows like Mery.
Christopher Livesay for NPR

Originally published on Sun March 1, 2015 2:26 pm

Foodies have long savored the cheeses of the Italian Alps. Dairy farmers still make it by hand, but unless you live in the region or can travel there, you'll have a hard time getting your hands on it. Much of this precious cheese isn't exported.

As you might imagine, this has not been good for business and the Alpine cheese makers have been slowly disappearing. That is until some farmers banded together — with the help of the Internet — and came up with an unusual adoption program called Adopt A Cow.

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Animals
6:13 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

To Curb Bear Population, Florida Reinstates Hunting Season

This black bear was spotted atop a tree in Tampa, Fla., on May 17, 2013. The bear population has been on the rise, so state wildlife officials are calling for a bear hunting season.
Skip O'Rourke MCT /Landov

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

For the first time in two decades, Florida officials have scheduled a bear hunting season. It's a response to a rise in bear attacks — but it has some environmentalists upset.

Experts say there's plenty of room for humans and black bears to co-exist, but the smell of food is pulling the animals out of the woods and into neighborhoods.

If you want to understand the situation, take a trip to Franklin County, in the pandhandle. A few months ago, a bear attacked a teenager there while she walked her dog near a convenience store.

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Code Switch
5:45 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Diversity Sells — But Hollywood Remains Overwhelmingly White, Male

Gina Rodriguez stars alongside Justin Baldoni in The CW's Jane the Virgin.
Danny Feld The CW

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

If you want an accurate picture of ethnic and gender diversity in the United States, don't look to Hollywood.

That's the conclusion of the "2015 Hollywood Diversity Report" conducted by the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies at UCLA.

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Remembrances
5:00 pm
Sat February 28, 2015

Mr. Spock Was A Biracial Role Model Of Notable Cool

Originally published on Sat February 28, 2015 6:39 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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