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The Two-Way
8:44 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Baltimore Police Promise Full Investigation Into Man's Death After Arrest

Demonstrators protest the death of Freddie Gray outside Baltimore City Hall on Monday.
David Dishneau AP

Officials in Baltimore, Md., say they will thoroughly investigate the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died after he was arrested by Baltimore Police more than a week ago.

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The Two-Way
8:27 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Norway Becoming First Country To Eliminate FM Radio

Norway is moving on from analog radios in 2017.
iStockphoto

Normay is going to eliminate FM radio in less than two years, the country's government announced, becoming the first country in the world to do so.

Norway is planning to transition completely to digital broadcasting in January 2017.

The Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) system offers a number of benefits over FM, said Thorhild Widvey, Norway's minister of culture, in a statement last week.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

U.S. Navy Sends Aircraft Carrier To Coast Of Yemen

The U.S. Navy has dispatched an aircraft carrier to waters off the coast of Yemen.

As NPR's Jackie Northam reports, the vessels are joining others in the region in an increasing show of force. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The U.S. Navy says it's deploying the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the guided-missile cruiser Normandy to the Gulf of Aden to ensure the vital shipping lanes in the volatile region remain open and safe.

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All Tech Considered
6:29 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moore's Law

Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore holds up a silicon wafer at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif., in 2005. Moore first noted 50 years ago that the number of transistors that can be packed into a computer chip doubles about every two years. That observation, called Moore's Law, has been the basis for the entire digital revolution.
Paul Sakuma AP

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

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World
5:35 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Mediterranean Migration Crisis Represents Scope Of Smuggling Business

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Media
5:35 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Small South Carolina Newspaper Takes Home Top Pulitzer Prize

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
5:35 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Federal Panel Revisits Contested Recommendation On Mammograms

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:38 pm

In 2009, I was among the scrum of reporters covering the controversial advice from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that women in their 40s think twice about regular mammograms. The task force pointed out that the net benefits in younger women were small and said women should weigh the pros and cons of screening before making a decision.

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Argentine Prosecutor Dismisses Accusations Against President

Argentine President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner.
Pool/Landov

An Argentine prosecutor moved on Monday to dismiss accusations leveled against President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner by the late prosecutor Alberto Nisman.

If you remember, right before he was found dead in his home, Nisman was about to tell lawmakers that he wanted to charge Kirchner for allegedly thwarting an investigation into the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires.

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The Salt
5:27 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

When Danish Cows See Fresh Spring Pasture, They Jump For Joy

Near the Danish city of Ikast, some 1,500 spectators gathered on Apr. 19 to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday at organic dairy farms around Denmark.
Courtesy of Organic Denmark

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:07 pm

"They're running a little late," chides an elderly gentleman, tapping his watch at 12:02 p.m. He's come to this farm near the Danish city of Ikast, along with about 1,500 others, to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday in Denmark. It's the Sunday in mid-April when thousands of organic dairy cows at 75 farms across the country are released into the green fields of spring. At exactly 12 noon. Eh hem.

Ah, but here they come!

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Music Reviews
4:53 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

'Sound & Color' A Bold Leap Forward For Alabama Shakes

Alabama Shakes' new album, Sound & Color, is powered by more than just the vocals of Brittany Howard.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

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World
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Chinese President Visits Pakistan To Finalize Billion-Dollar Trade Route Plan

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

BP Oil Spill Anniversary Highlights Changes In Industry Safety Standards

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Energy
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

In Northwest, A Push To Protect Forest As Geothermal Projects Near

Geologists Dave Tucker (left) and Pete Stelling at the Mount Baker hot springs in Washington's Cascade Mountains. The springs are within the large tract of federal land that could soon be open for geothermal development.
Ashley Ahearn KUOW

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

In the Pacific Northwest, the U.S. Forest Service is set to open more than 80,000 acres for potential geothermal power development. Companies would then be able to apply for permits to build power plants that would harness the heat beneath the surface to spin turbines and generate electricity.

All of this would be taking place in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Washington state.

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Around the Nation
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Indiana Governor Extends Public Health Emergency To Fight HIV Outbreak

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
4:39 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Meet The 'Accidental Activists' Of The Supreme Court's Same-Sex-Marriage Case

Jayne Rowse (left) and April DeBoer with their four children, Jacob (from left), Rylee, Nolan and Ryanne at a news conference in March.
Valerie Macon Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 6:23 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court hears legal arguments next week in the legal battle over same-sex marriage. It's an extraordinarily high-stakes clash, but the men and women at the center of it see themselves as incredibly ordinary. The 12 couples and two widowers include doctors, lawyers, an Army sergeant, nurses and teachers.

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Goats and Soda
3:59 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

You Don't Want To Mess With An Angry Mother

Phyllis Omido is one of six winners of the 2015 Goldman Environmental prizes.
Goldman Environmental Prize Courtesy of The Goldman Environmental Prize

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 4:00 pm

In the gritty Kenyan port city of Mombasa, Phyllis Omido knew that industry could pose a danger to the surrounding communities. She'd worked on environmental impact assessment reports for several factories.

But when her 2½-year-old son, King David, got sick with a mysterious condition, it didn't occur to her that it might be from environmental toxins. He had a high fever that wasn't responding to medication. He couldn't sleep. He was plagued with diarrhea, and his eyes became runny. He spent two weeks in the hospital, and still no one could figure out what was wrong.

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NPR Story
3:53 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Millions Of 'Boomerang Buyers' Could Reshape Housing Market

Signs are seen outside a foreclosed home and a house for sale February 24, 2009 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

The first wave of millions of homeowners who lost their home to foreclosure may soon be on the market to get back into buying real estate.

These so-called “boomerang buyers” are now past the seven-year window they need to begin repairing their credit to qualify to buy a new home.

CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger tells Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about these boomerang buyers and how they may change the housing market in the next decade.

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The Salt
3:40 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Appetite For Gulf Seafood Is Back, But The Crabs And Oysters Aren't

Blue crabs brought back to Tony Goutierrez's dock in Hopedale, La. For the past few years, his traps have been coming up empty. "It's sad to see it go, but it's going — this way of life is going to disappear," he says.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 9:53 pm

In 2010, just after the BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico exploded, seafood restaurants were bombarded with questions from concerned diners: "How bad is the spill?" "Is this from the Gulf?" "Is it safe?" Demand for Gulf seafood tanked.

"You have to remember, that was literally weeks and months on end when you could turn on the TV at any time of day and see an oil well leaking unabatedly into the Gulf of Mexico," says Brett Anderson, feature food writer for Nola.com.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

'Post And Courier' Of Charleston, S.C., Wins Pulitzer For Public Service

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 8:34 pm

Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET

The Post and Courier of Charleston, S.C., has been awarded the 2015 Pulitzer Prize award for public service for Till Death Do Us Part, a series the award's panel said "probed why South Carolina is among the deadliest states in the union for women and put the issue of what to do about it on the state's agenda."

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Drought Won't Mean More Expensive Peaches

(alicehenneman/Flickr)

Fruits, nuts, vegetables, dairy products – California produces so much of what Americans eat. Agricultural economist Dan Sumner joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to explain why the current drought will not increase produce prices.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Vermont's Largest Tree Tapper Won't Sell Syrup

Michael Argyelan, CFO of Sweet Tree Holdings, shows off a maple syrup evaporator at a new processing plant in Island Pond. The out-of-state company is planning to produce value-added maple products that Argyelan says won't compete with local producers. (Charlotte Albright/Vermont Public Radio)

Island Pond, Vermont, is home to only about 900 people, but it could become the maple sugar capital of North America. A company called Sweet Tree has bought about 7,000 acres in the Northeast Kingdom village and tapped 100,000 trees this year.

The thing is, they don’t want to make the stuff you pour on pancakes. Charlotte Albright, from Here & Now contributor Vermont Public Radio, explains why.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Comcast And Time Warner Work To Save Merger

David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President of Comcast, and Robert D. Marcus, Chairman and CEO of Time Warner Cable, prepare to take their seats prior to the start of a House Judiciary Committee hearing on the proposed merger of Time Warner Cable and Comcast, on Capitol Hill, May 8, 2014 in Washington, D.C. The proposed merger would combine the two largest U.S. cable companies and give Comcast about 30 million subscribers in the United States. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

This week, Comcast and Time Warner will sit down with Justice Department officials in the hopes of keeping their $45.2 billion merger alive.

It’s been more than 14 months since the cable mega-merger was announced, and this marks the first face-to-face meeting with regulators. This meeting will likely focus on possible concessions to address the government’s concerns.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins with details.

Guest

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Baltimore Mayor Seeks Answers In Freddie Gray's Death

Demonstrators protest the death of Freddie Gray outside Baltimore City Hall on Monday, April 20, 2015. Gray died Sunday, a week after he was rushed to the hospital with spinal injuries following an encounter with four Baltimore police officers. (David Dishneau/AP)

Relatives, activists and even Baltimore city officials have more questions than answers about what happened to Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old man who died one week after he was rushed to the hospital with spinal injuries following an encounter with four Baltimore police officers.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Presidential Hopefuls Try To Stand Out In New Hampshire

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) speaks at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit April 17, 2015 in Nashua, New Hampshire. He was one of the Republican hopefuls in the state this weekend. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

All eyes are on New Hampshire – at least for those who have an eye on the presidency.

Hillary Clinton is campaigning in the state today and tomorrow, and over the weekend, Republican candidates and prospective candidates were there too, for the unofficial kickoff of the campaign season.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to NPR’s Domenico Montanaro about the latest from the campaign trail.

Guest

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

University Of Oklahoma's New Diversity Chief: 'We Can Do Better'

Tape with the word "UNHEARD" covers the mouth of the sculpture "The Sower" at the University of Oklahoma on March 11, 2015 in Norman, Oklahoma. The statue was marked by the black student group OU UNHEARD at the university. (Brett Deering/Getty Images)

The University of Oklahoma’s first chief diversity officer starts his new job soon, three months after the university kicked out a fraternity and expelled two students who were seen on video leading a racist chant.

University president David Boren was praised for acting swiftly once the video was made public last month. But the University of Oklahoma is one of only four schools in the Big 12 Conference without a chief diversity officer.

Some minority students at the university are asking, what took the university president so long to hire one?

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Kenya Faces Obstacles To End Al-Shabab Recruitment

Masks with the names of the victims of the attack on Garissa University College are displayed during a memorial concert in downtown Nairobi on April 14, 2015. The massacre, claimed by Somalia's Al-Qaeda-linked Shebab insurgents on a university campus in Kenya's nothern town of Garissa, claimed the lives of 142 students, three police officers and three soldiers at the university in the northeastern town of Garissa. (Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images)

The Kenyan government has decided on the need for radical action after the Garissa University attack two weeks ago, when al-Shabab militants killed 148 people. Part of that plan of action is intended to root out homegrown Islamists.

This comes after the revelation that one of the four gunmen in the Garissa attack was a Kenyan law graduate whose father is a top local official in the northeast.

The government wants the Dadaab camp for Somali refugees to close; they’ve also offered a 10-day amnesty for anyone radicalized.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Australia's Kevin Rudd On U.S.-China Relations

President Obama smiles as a group of children wave flags and flowers during a welcome ceremony held by Chinese President Xi Jinping on Nov. 12, 2014. (Andy Wong/AP)

Time magazine just released its list of the 100 most influential people in the world. One of the names on the list is China’s premier Xi Jinping.

That comes as no surprise to former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, who writes in Time that Xi looks like he’s on track to pass Chairman Mao as China’s most powerful leader.

But what about beyond China? What influence does Xi have on the global stage – especially with the United States?

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

75-Year-Old Figure Skater Won't Let Stroke Stop Her

Patricia competes to the song 'The Rose'. (Quick Silver Shots)

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 4:58 pm

Patricia McNamara, 75, of Orange County, Calf. started skating in her late 40s, and she’s participated in every one of the U.S. Adult Figure Skating Championships since the Adult Nationals event started in 1995.

“I feel like the best of myself is really being expressed.”

She says skating helped her recover from breast cancer, and she’s hoping it helps her fully recover from a stroke seven years ago, in which she lost some muscle control on her left side.

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Shots - Health News
3:09 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Doctors Don't Always Ask About Pet-Related Health Risks

Reptiles like leopard geckos can bring Salmonella along with them.
iStockphoto

If you're being treated for cancer, an iguana might not be the pet for you.

Ditto if you're pregnant, elderly or have small children at home.

Pets can transmit dozens of diseases to humans, but doctors aren't always as good as they should be in asking about pets in the home and humans' health issues, a study finds.

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Author Interviews
3:06 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

'I Regret Everything': Toni Morrison Looks Back On Her Personal Life

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 5:46 pm

Now that she's in her mid-80s, celebrated author Toni Morrison feels aches, pains and regret.

She tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "When I'm not creating or focusing on something I can imagine or invent, I think I go back over my life — I don't recommend this, by the way — and you pick up, 'Oh, what did you do that for? Why didn't you understand this?' Not just with children, as a parent, but with other people, with friends. ... It's not profound regret; it's just a wiping up of tiny little messes that you didn't recognize as mess when they were going on."

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