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I'm old enough to have grown up in a household with a single rotary telephone.

I imagine that most children would not know what to do with one today. Conversely, my grandparents, if I could bring them back to life, would have had no idea of what to do with a smartphone.

Technology changes the way we live — and it also changes us.

Forced labor, human trafficking and other rights abuses are "widespread" on the Thai fishing industry, according to a new Human Rights Watch report that provides an update on a sector that has been cited for enabling slavery conditions.

UPDATED AT: 10:07 a.m.; the complete list follows.

Frustrated with the Vietnam War, The Man, and the general state of the nation, hippies set out to do everything differently. They founded rural communes, dabbled in psychedelics, and cultivated a laissez-faire approach to personal hygiene. But, like everyone else in the world, they had to eat.

Updated at 10:09 a.m. ET

The federal government is back open for business Tuesday, but the immigration fight that brought it to a three-day shutdown is far from over.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Updated 8:50 a.m.

This year's Academy Award nominations were announced Tuesday morning via live stream. See the complete list of nominees here.

The winners will be announced on March 4, at an awards ceremony hosted by Jimmy Kimmel.

A powerful magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck off the coast of Alaska late Monday night, initially prompting a tsunami warning for a large section of the state's coast and parts of Canada. As more data came in, the U.S. Tsunami Warning System downgraded the threat to an advisory for Alaska's Chignik Bay.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Bill Cosby performed at a jazz club in Philadelphia on Monday night, the first time he has performed publicly since 2015, when numerous accusations of sexual misconduct began to build against the entertainer.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

5 hours ago

Oregon is in a battle royal over how to pay for expanded Medicaid.

The fight revolves around Measure 101, a ballot initiative that you have to go back a few years to understand.

During the 1990s, Oregon's then-governor, Dr. John Kitzhaber, had a background in health care — he'd worked as an emergency room doctor. His legacy in the state includes the expansion of health insurance for the poor, an idea he managed to sell to both Democrats and Republicans.

Tucked into the new tax law is a provision that offers companies a tax credit if they provide paid family and medical leave for their lower-wage workers.

Many people support a national strategy for paid parental and family leave, especially for workers who are not in management and are less likely to get that benefit on the job. But consultants, scholars and consumer advocates alike say the new tax credit probably won't encourage many companies to take the plunge.

Five oil field workers are missing after an explosion and fire Monday at a natural gas drilling site in southeastern Oklahoma.

Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma reports for NPR's Newscast unit:

"The explosion buckled the drilling rig operating near a small town 100 miles south of Tulsa and fueled a smoke plume that was visible for miles.

In a statement, the company operating the drilling rig said it wasn't sure what caused the explosion and fire.

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló says he is moving to sell off the U.S. territory's public power company, as nearly a third of the island's electric customers remain without power four months after Hurricane Maria struck the island on Sept. 20.

Rosselló said Monday that it might take 18 months to privatize the insolvent Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, or PREPA, the largest U.S. public utility as measured by the number of customers — 3.3 million.

The sudden eruption of a volcano overlooking a ski resort in central Japan rained ash on the slopes and apparently triggered an avalanche that left at least one person missing and 10 others injured.

Japan's Meteorological Agency, or JMA, reports that Mount Kusatsu-Shirane, located about 120 miles northwest of Tokyo, erupted early Tuesday.

Pledging to defend American businesses and workers, President Trump imposed tariffs on imported solar panel components and large residential washing machines on Monday.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

A top editor at the New York Daily News has been accused of sexual harassment and is now under investigation by the paper's parent company after inquiries by NPR.

Managing Editor Robert Moore has been accused of creating a sexualized atmosphere, pressuring women for attention and punishing those who objected. Tronc would not say whether he remains on the job or has been suspended or placed on leave.

Pennsylvania Supreme Court Strikes Down Voting Map

16 hours ago

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the state's congressional district map today, saying it "clearly, plainly and palpably" violates the state Constitution.

The justices ruled 4-3 just days after hearing oral arguments in the case.

In suburbs just outside the city of Chicago, some police officers are paid fast-food wages; they work part-time patrolling high crime areas, just so they can use their badge to get better paying security jobs.

Many police chiefs say the low-wages and part-time positions are consequences of inadequate funding. That means departments can't pay for ongoing training, can't afford to fire problem officers and don't have the capacity to investigate police shootings.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A German nurse serving a life sentence for murdering two patients is suspected of killing another 97 people by lethal injection.

If convicted, Niels Högel would become Germany's most deadly serial killer ever.

Högel, now 41, was charged with 97 further counts of murder on Monday. His third trial in the northern city of Oldenburg, Germany, is expected to start later this year, according to Reuters.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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