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The Salt
4:58 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Edible Packaging? Retailers Not Quite Ready To Ditch The Wrapper

A strawberry vanilla WikiPearl made with Stonyfield frozen yogurt.
Stonyfield and WikiPearl, Inc.

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:59 pm

A handful of companies are trying to take an idea straight out of Willy Wonka and turn it into reality: edible packaging. I mean, why dump tons of waste into landfills when the container your food comes in could be a part of the snack?

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New England News
4:35 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Mass. Gaming Commission Awards Casino License to Wynn's Everett Proposal

Casino mogul Steve Wynn, right, speaks as Everett, Mass., Mayor Carlo DeMaria looks on during a news conference at Everett City Hall on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 2:54 pm

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has awarded the Boston-area casino license to Wynn Resorts, which plans to build a casino resort in Everett.

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Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Calpers Pulls Public Employee Pensions Out Of Hedge Funds

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

California's public employee pension is divesting its entire $4 billion stake in hedge funds. Calpers says the investment proved to be too complex and not worth the expenses. Many public pensions turned to hedge funds in hopes of boosting returns and gaining protection from market crashes, but most have lagged behind market indexes in recent years.

Book Reviews
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Book Review: 'Lovely, Dark, Deep'

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Planet Money
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

A Tiny, $25 Million Mistake

Photo of a "wrong way" sign.
David M. Goehring Flickr

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

When Matt Levine graduated from law school, he got a job at a fancy corporate law firm. Big office; long hours.

"I remember going to sleep at 3, 4 a.m. under my desk, which was not that unusual," says Levine. "But I remember because it was my birthday."

His firm was representing a small Midwestern chain in this one contract negotiation. Levine's job was to make sure the contract reflected all the tiny details.

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The Salt
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Thanks To Nutella, The World Needs More Hazelnuts

Thomas Molnar, a plant biologist at Rutgers University, is breeding new hazelnut varieties that can resist Eastern Filbert Blight.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

Nutella, that sinfully indulgent chocolate-hazelnut spread, turns 50 this year, and it's come a long way, baby.

There's even a "Nutella bar" in midtown Manhattan, right off Fifth Avenue, tucked inside a grand temple of Italian food called Eataly. There's another Nutella bar at Eataly in Chicago. Here, you can order Nutella on bread, Nutella on a croissant, and Nutella on crepes.

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Shots - Health News
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Colleges Brainstorm Ways To Cut Back On Binge Drinking

Frostburg State University police officer Derrick Pirolozzi, right, conducts a "knock and talk" at a house near campus, reminding students of laws on underage drinking and open containers.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:19 pm

It's early Friday night, and Frostburg State University police officer Derrick Pirolozzi is just starting the late shift. At a white clapboard house he jumps out of his SUV to chat with four students on the front steps.

"S'up guys!" he calls out, assuring them he just wants to chat. All are underage but one, and that one tells Pirolozzi he's got a string of alcohol violations from past years. Pirolozzi banters a bit. He tells them to "call anytime," and reminds them not to walk around the street with open containers.

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Shots - Health News
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

When Patients Set Science's Research Agenda, Who Loses?

Coalitions of patient advocates now help steer research funding toward particular projects.
Lilli Carré for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

The federal government has poured more than $3 billion into breast cancer research over the past couple of decades, but the results have been disappointing. The disease remains a stubborn killer of women.

So the National Breast Cancer Coalition is trying something bold: The advocacy group has decided that it's not simply going to lobby for more research dollars. Instead, its leaders are sitting down at the table with scientists studying the disease and telling them how they'd like that money to be spent.

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

LA Heat Wave Triggers Record Demand For Electricity

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:42 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Obama Gives New Details On America's Effort To Fight Ebola

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:21 pm

President Obama announced details of his plan Tuesday to help contain the Ebola outbreak that has caused more than 2,400 deaths in West Africa. The strategy reportedly includes sending up to 3,000 military personnel to the region.

Obama spoke at the Atlanta, Ga., headquarters of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tuesday afternoon.

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Shots - Health News
4:05 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Americans Waistlines Are Expanding, And That's Not Good Fat

If your belt needs to be let out a notch, you're not alone. The average American waistline is growing even though obesity rates haven't grown, too. And excess abdominal fat increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke.

The collective American waistline grew by an more than inch from 1999-2000 to 2011-2012, according to a study published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association.

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Goats and Soda
3:12 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Which Contagious Diseases Are The Deadliest?

Do you know what the deadliest disease is? Hint: It's not Ebola (viral particles seen here in a digitally colorized microscopic image, at top right, along with similar depictions of other contagious diseases)
NPR Composite CDC

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:47 pm

No one knows what the death toll in the Ebola epidemic will be. As of Tuesday, nearly 2,500 people have died and nearly 5,000 have caught the virus, the World Health Organization says.

So how does this epidemic compare with the toll taken by other contagious diseases?

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

Belgium Agrees To Euthanize Man Convicted Of Murder, Rape

Inmate Frank Van Den Bleeken, seen here in court last autumn, says he wants to die because he sees no progress in the mental problems that were linked to his crimes of murder and rape.
Herman Ricour AP

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 4:14 pm

In a country whose laws don't allow for the death penalty, the case of a Belgian man who sees himself as a threat to society — and wants to die — is putting new focus on Belgium's health care and justice system, as well as its laws allowing euthanasia.

After an appeals court in Brussels approved a deal allowing inmate Frank Van Den Bleeken to die from an assisted suicide, the country's justice minister cleared the way for his transfer to a hospital late Monday.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

BP Lawyers Use Old-School Trick; Judge Not Amused

U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier ruled nearly two weeks ago that BP acted recklessly in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig accident and oil spill.
Alastair Grant AP

Back in school, did you ever fudge the spacing on a report to meet the teacher's page-length requirement? Lawyers representing oil company BP tried something similar in a recent court filing connected to the company's 2010 drilling rig accident and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Tue September 16, 2014

What Will Alibaba Do With $25 Billion?

The Chinese internet giant Alibaba is on track to have the biggest ever initial stock offering on Wall Street this Friday.

Alibaba says it will offer 368.1 million shares at between $66 to $68 each, which would garner more than $25 billion for the company.

The hype has been building with Alibaba executives are on a road show meeting with potential investors across the U.S., but the company faces a series of questions about how it will fare outside of China.

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