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The Two-Way
8:00 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Senate Approves $8 Billion Transportation Package

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:29 pm

The Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would keep transportation dollars flowing until December. But it has not yet solved the problem of how to avoid any disruption in highway spending.

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Goats and Soda
7:59 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

The Hidden Costs Of Fighting Polio In Pakistan

During nationwide polio campaigns, hundreds of thousands of health workers go door to door, giving children two drops of the polio vaccine.
Anadolu Agency Getty Images

Pakistan is currently at the center of the global effort to eradicate polio. Although the country has reported only about a hundred cases this year, that's more cases than in all other nations combined.

Eliminating the paralyzing disease is a major logistical operation in Pakistan. More than 200,000 vaccinators fan out across the country, several times a year, to inoculate millions of children. The government also deploys tens of thousands of armed security forces to guard the workers.

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The Two-Way
7:30 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Israeli Bombing Ruins Gaza's Only Power Plant

Smoke and fire rise from the explosion of an Israeli strike over Gaza City on Tuesday
Hatem Moussa AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 8:20 pm

Israel broadened its assault on Gaza on Tuesday, wrecking the region's only power plant and killing more than 125 Palestinians.

Barrages "destroyed Hamas's media offices, the home of a top leader and what Palestinians said was a devastating hit on the only electricity plant," The New York Times reports.

The bombings came on a day when hope briefly arose about a new cease-fire. Both Israeli and Palestinian officials in the West Bank discussed the possibility.

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The Two-Way
6:19 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

McDonald's Responsible For Treatment Of Workers, Agency Says

The National Labor Relations Board says McDonald's shares responsibility for how workers are treated at its franchised restaurants.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 7:04 pm

McDonald's shares responsibility for how workers are treated at its franchised restaurants, the general counsel's office for the National Labor Relations Board announced Tuesday.

Since November 2012, NLRB has had 181 cases filed involving McDonald's. Many have been dismissed, but the agency said that McDonald's USA LLC will be considered a joint employer in cases that are found to have merit.

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Parallels
6:15 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

France Presses On With Deal To Sell Two Warships To Russia

People holding Ukrainian and Crimean Tatar flags demonstrate in front of the French-built Vladivostok warship in St. Nazaire, western France, on June 1. The protesters are opposed to the sale of the Vladivostok and Sevastopol warships to Russia.
Jean-Sebastien Evrard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:59 pm

France plans to go ahead with the sale of two warships to the Kremlin, even as the European Union and U.S. strengthen sanctions on Russia amid continued fighting in Ukraine and the aftermath of the downed Malaysian airliner.

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The Two-Way
5:51 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Court Rejects Law Threatening Mississippi's Last Abortion Clinic

Anti-abortion protester Mary McLaurin calls out to a patient at the Jackson Women's Health Organization in 2013.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

A federal appeals court has rejected a Mississippi law that would have forced the state's only abortion clinic to close.

In a 2-1 decision, a panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday turned aside arguments that women seeking to have an abortion could have the procedure done in a neighboring state.

Closing the clinic in Jackson would place an "undue burden" on women, the court found.

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The Salt
5:13 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Choose Mackerel Over Shrimp

A fisherman pulls a basket filled with anchovies aboard a fishing boat off of Peru's northern port of Chimbote, in 2012. Peru is the world's top fishmeal exporter, producing about a third of worldwide supply.
Enrique Castro-Mendivil Reuters/Landov

Small fatty fish like mackerel, herring, sardines and anchovies are high in omega-3s, vitamin D and low on the food chain.

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Digital Life
4:59 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

OkCupid Sometimes Messes A Bit With Love, In The Name Of Science

OkCupid, the online dating site, disclosed Monday that they sometimes manipulate their users' profiles for experiments. Christian Rudder, co-founder and president of OkCupid, tells Audie Cornish that these experiments help the site improve how it works.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Reviews
4:56 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

A Fond Farewell From An Old Memphis Maverick

When "Cowboy" Jack Clement died in August 2013, he'd just completed what would be his final album, For Once and for All.
J. Niles Clement Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:48 pm

The late musician Jack Clement's nickname, "Cowboy," came from a radio show he was part of in the early 1960s. It had nothing to do with horses or boots, but it happened to fit his maverick approach to work.

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The Two-Way
4:54 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Y'all Keep Talking: Lab Scratches 'Southern Accent Reduction' Course

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:04 pm

Government scientists can speak Southern after all.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has announced that in response to complaints from staff, it's canceling plans to hold a six-week "Southern Accent Reduction" course, the Knoxville News Sentinel reports.

Officials at the scientific complex in east Tennessee said they had only been responding to an employee request. They've now responded to the anger of offended workers.

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Politics
4:47 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

The New SuperPAC That Spends Big So That Others Spend Less

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 4:56 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
4:39 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

American Doctor Sick With Ebola Now Fighting For His Life

Medical workers treat Ebola patients at the Eternal Love Winning Africa hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. Three workers at the hospital, including Dr. Kent Brantly (left), have tested positive for Ebola.
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 5:33 pm

A doctor trained in Fort Worth, Texas, is now a victim of the Ebola outbreak he was battling.

Kent Brantly, 33, had been caring for Ebola patients in Liberia's capital, Monrovia, for several months when he noticed he had symptoms of the deadly virus last Wednesday.

He immediately put himself into an isolation ward.

"He is still conversing and is in isolation. But he is seriously ill with a very grave prognosis," says Dr. David McRay, of John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, who spoke to Brantly by phone on Monday.

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Law
4:09 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Coaches Help Released Inmates Step From The Cell Into A Job

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 4:56 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:09 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

The Great Blue Hope: Michelle Nunn Tries The Improbable In Ga.

Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn greets campaign volunteers at South DeKalb Community Achievement Center in Decatur, Ga., on May 13. The U.S. Senate race in Georgia is one of the most closely watched in the country.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 6:21 pm

Georgia has been considered safely red territory for more than a decade. But there's a new energy among Democrats in the state, where candidate Michelle Nunn represents the party's best chance of winning a Senate seat in years.

This is Nunn's first run for public office, but she's far from an unknown in a state where her father, Sam Nunn, is a Democratic icon who represented Georgia in the Senate for more than two decades.

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History
4:09 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Forget Tea Pot Dome: Harding's Love Letters Make For A New Steamy Scandal

A letter from Warren G. Harding to his lover, Carrie Fulton Phillips, dated Jan. 24, 1916.
Don Gonyea NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 7:50 pm

President Warren G. Harding presided over Prohibition, died before completing his first term, and is consistently ranked by historians and the public as one of the worst U.S. presidents.

But suddenly he's getting a lot of attention, thanks to a cache of steamy love letters he wrote to a mistress over 15 years. Sealed for a half-century, today the Library of Congress made the entire collection available to the public.

James Hutson, chief archivist of the manuscript division at the library, pulled a box of the letters from the collection this morning.

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