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Sometimes it takes a Sunday morning to see how much damage was done Saturday night.

So it was this weekend, in New Hampshire and in the broader national conversation about the 2016 presidential race.

On Saturday night, many observers seized on the meatiest moment from the GOP debate staged here — perhaps the most salient moment of all the debates so far. It was the clash between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio that turned into a stunning exposé of Rubio's technique.

Beyoncé is one of a kind — the kind of star who can drop a surprise music video and see much of the Internet and social media instantly explode.

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Peyton Manning is once more on top of the world. The Denver Broncos quarterback — a future Hall of Famer in what may be his final season — is once more a Super Bowl champion. The Broncos have beaten the Carolina Panthers, 24-10.

The game fell well short of a quarterback duel, though. Again, it was the Denver defense that led the way, harassing Cam Newton, forcing turnover after turnover and even tacking on a score of their own.

This post is about to recommend that you read two fairly long stories about Polish politics.

It's worth it, I promise. They offer twin views on a story that's not just important geopolitically — it's fascinating on a human level.

Here's how The Guardian opens its examination of the mysterious crash that has reshaped the Polish psyche — not to mention Poland's government:

It is one of the great ironies of biology that sometimes breakthroughs seem to come when it is supposed that its problems have less to do with the body, which is pulsing, hot, and wet, and more to do with information processing, which is dry and computational.

To give an example, vision is widely believed to be the process of extracting information about an environment from an image. There is nothing distinctively biological about this. A machine can do it, in principle at least.

The magnitude-6.4 earthquake has left 26 people dead. Camila had the news in an earlier post.

Here is the story in photographs, which tell stories of life and death, destruction and hope in the quake's aftermath:

A professor at an evangelical Christian college who was suspended for saying Christians and Muslims worship the same God will no longer be teaching at the school.

As we've reported, Larycia Hawkins, an associate political science professor who had tenure at Wheaton College in Illinois, was suspended from her job in December.

"Irresponsible," "senseless," "deplorable," "destabilizing," "totally unacceptable."

North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket has filled the isolated nation with pride — and sparked fierce censure from the rest of the world.

As we reported yesterday, the launch on Sunday morning local time arrives just a month after a nuclear test that had already raised tensions in the area:

Primary season has officially begun. And as the presidential candidates campaign ahead of Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, both Republicans and Democrats are making big arguments in response to some big questions about their party's future.

Is there such a thing as an "establishment lane" that can win the GOP contest? Can a Democrat be both moderate and a progressive? Is it better to be pragmatic or idealistic?

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TV Ad-Spending Bonanza Revs Up In New Hampshire

15 hours ago
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In New Hampshire, Bernie Sanders looks poised to beat Hilary Clinton in this Tuesday's primary. NPR's Tamara Keith reports you can tell the candidates' place in the race by how they are campaigning.

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More than 24 hours after a deadly magnitude-6.4 earthquake struck Taiwan, rescuers are still pulling survivors out of the rubble.

The earthquake hit at roughly 4 a.m. local time on Saturday (Friday afternoon in U.S. time zones), just two days before the Lunar New Year celebrations. The city of Tainan was the hardest hit — and a single building, a 17-story apartment building that toppled like a folding accordion, caused most of the casualties.

At least 26 people are confirmed dead from the quake, 24 of them from the building collapse, The Associated Press reports.

If you've been following the news about the spread of the Zika virus throughout Latin America, you've probably gotten lost in the jargon once or twice. What's a vector? A reservoir? What's local transmission — the opposite of express transmission?

So we went to the experts to help us wade through all this murky language. And they were helpful — sort of. Because it turns out that even the experts don't agree 100 percent on the definitions.

The Republican presidential candidates met tonight in Manchester, N.H. for the final debate before the first-in-the-nation primary on Tuesday, February 9.

Unlike the last Republican debate, Donald Trump, who came in second in the Iowa caucuses, decided to participate. He joined the winner of the Iowa caucuses, Ted Cruz, as well as Marco Rubio, who came in third. Trump and Rubio were only separated by one percentage point in the caucuses.

Saturday's GOP debate was the final one before Tuesday's New Hampshire primary. Here were five key moments:

1. That awkward start

One key thing has to happen before the debate starts: the candidates have to take the stage.

That proved more complicated than usual on Saturday night, as the ABC News Republican debate began with Ben Carson refusing to walk out to his podium, even after the moderators called his name.

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

All football players know they're one big hit away from the end of their career. Delvin Breaux was a high school senior with a scholarship on the line when he took one of those hits. It broke his neck.

GOP Debate Preview

Feb 6, 2016
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Can a kid succeed in school with only a mobile device for Internet access at home?

Lorena Uribe doesn't have to think about that one:

"Absolutely not," she says.

When her old computer broke down several years ago, she and her teenage daughter found themselves in a bind for about five months: homework to do and no computer or broadband access at home.

"I would take her to the mall and have her sit in Panera so she could use the Wi-Fi on her iPad from school," Uribe says.

With February comes Black History Month in the U.S., a time designated to reflect on the history and contributions of people of African descent in this country. And while the month may invite debate among some, one thing rarely does in the U.S.: the idea of calling oneself, or being described as, black or African-American.

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