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5:15 am
Fri December 26, 2014

Most Federal Workers Get Day After Christmas Off

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:11 am
Fri December 26, 2014

Turkish President's Aggressive Behavior In 2014 Gets More Notice

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 7:02 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:11 am
Fri December 26, 2014

Do Fish Have Fingers?

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 7:02 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:34 am
Fri December 26, 2014

A Split View On Obamacare's Past And Future

Kevin Counihan (left) runs HealthCare.gov, and Michael Cannon, of the Cato Institute, is a prominent critic of Obamacare.
Courtesy of Chion Wolf/WNPR ; Courtesy of the Cato Institute

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 7:52 am

Kevin Counihan and Michael Cannon look at the Affordable Care Act and see very different things.

Cannon is part of the brain trust behind a Supreme Court case that could result in the repeal of a part of the exchanges he says is illegal.

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Around the Nation
3:33 am
Fri December 26, 2014

Getting High Safely: Aspen Launches Marijuana Education Campaign

Officials in Aspen have put out a brochure on how to use marijuana safely and legally.
Marci Krivonen

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 12:35 pm

The state government and the marijuana industry in Colorado are working to educate people about how to use pot safely. But in the high Rockies, one community is taking matters into its own hands.

The local sheriff in Aspen is leading an education effort that targets skiers and snowboarders flocking to the winter resort. And the sheriff isn't waiting until visitors hit the slopes — their education starts at the airport with pamphlets on marijuana.

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The Two-Way
1:59 am
Fri December 26, 2014

Oregon Woman Released From East Timor Prison

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 2:36 am

In January 2013, Dr. Stacey Addison of Portland, Ore., embarked on a trip around the world. Her starting point was Antarctica.

Addison, a veterinarian, had made all the necessary plans and had sold her house so she would have enough money for the trip.

In September of 2014, she shared a taxi with a stranger. That decision led to months of incarceration in the tiny nation of East Timor.

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The Two-Way
11:46 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

A Decade After Tsunami, Asia's Shattered Coasts Are On The Mend

A lone mosque that survived devastating tidal waves sits amid the ruins of the village of Lhoknga, outside the provincial capital Banda Aceh, on Jan. 3, 2005. The mosque became a symbol of the tsunami's destruction.
Bloomberg Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri December 26, 2014 9:29 am

It was one of the strongest earthquakes ever recorded and it triggered the deadliest tsunami in history.

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The Two-Way
11:24 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

'The Interview', Greeted By Sold-Out Shows, May Net Millions This Weekend

Patrons queue up to see "The Interview" Thursday at the the Cinefamily at Silent Movie Theater in Los Angeles.
Richard Vogel AP

Lawyer Derek Karpel thought The Interview would be a horrible movie after reading some of the reviews, but told reporter Julie Walker that his opinion was a bit different after he saw the film on Thursday at Cinema Village in New York City.

"It's not a great movie — this is not Kubrick, this is a stupid Seth Rogen/James Franco movie," he said. "With that said, they were still very funny. I thought it was well done."

Web developer Nick Doiron, who was at the same screening, said he thought that the film lived up to the hype, and that the audience seemed to agree.

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The Two-Way
5:43 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Somalia's Al-Shabab Attacks African Peacekeepers

African Union Mission to Somalia (AMISOM), African Union soldiers march along the top of a hill overlooking the al-Shabab stronghold of Barawe, a coastal town 135 miles southwest of Mogadishu, in Somalia, in October.
Tobin Jones AP

Originally published on Thu December 25, 2014 5:57 pm

The African Union has condemned an assault on the organization's main base in Somalia by al-Shabab extremists that killed three AU soldiers and a civilian contractor.

AMISOM, the AU mission in Somalia, issued a statement Thursday saying that the four had been killed in a gunfight as soldiers tried to repel the attack by eight militant gunmen.

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The Salt
4:52 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

What Would Jesus Drink? A Class Exploring Ancient Wines Asks

An illustration depicts Jesus Christ transforming water into wine during the wedding at Cana (John 2:7).
Joseph Martin Kronheim Kean Collection/Getty Images

Inside the Boston Wine School, Jonathon Alsop places empty glasses and plate of figs and cheese before a small group of students. Alsop, who founded the school in 2000, is doing a test run of a new class that poses the question: What would Jesus drink?

"This is ... a cheese that Jesus might have eaten," he tells students. "It's called Egyptian Roumy — it was a cheese that was introduced to the Egyptians by the Romans. It's a sheep's milk cheese."

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Found Recipes
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

After The Presents, A Buttery Tea Cake Tradition

Susan Tannewitz-Karnes grew up eating Mrs. Lawrence every Christmas. The tea cake was so beloved that Tannewitz-Karnes and her siblings would argue over who received more than their fair share.
Courtesy of Susan Tannewitz-Karnes

When listener Susan Tannewitz-Karnes was a child in Johnson City, Tenn., Christmas wasn't Christmas without an English tea cake baked by their neighbor, Mrs. Lawrence.

She would deliver it about a week before Christmas. "We would come home from school and my mother would just say, 'Mrs. Lawrence came by! We have Mrs. Lawrence!' And we'd say, 'Oh, yes! Yes!' We couldn't wait."

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The Salt
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Why Bury Fig Trees? A Curious Tradition Preserves A Taste Of Italy

Michele Vaccaro buries a fig tree in the yard of Mary Menniti in Sewickley, Pa.
Hal Klein for NPR

On a grey, chilly December morning in Sewickley, Pa., Michele Vaccaro and his assistant are digging a trench in a garden.

"It looks like we're burying somebody over here — a body," Vaccaro says.

Cast your old Godfather stereotypes aside, because this Calabrian immigrant is carrying on a much more wholesome tradition: He's burying a 12-foot fig tree.

"It's been done for years. Probably [since] the 1800s," he says, when Italians coming to America first started bringing fig trees over from the old country. "They would put them always in the ground."

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Around the Nation
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Chicago Officials Spar With South Dakota Over Airport Ads

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Employers Help Legal Immigrants On Path To Citizenship

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
4:29 pm
Thu December 25, 2014

Low Gas Prices Predicted For 2015 And Beyond

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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