NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
6:03 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Clerical Error Puts Church On New York's 'George Carlin Way'

The Corpus Christi Church in Manhattan, where iconoclastic comedian George Carlin once attended school and later ridiculed in some of his monologues, has a new street address: George Carlin Way.

The New York Times calls what's being described as a clerical error "an irony of Carlinesque proportions." The church fought a street named after the comedian since the idea was proposed three years ago.

Read more
Code Switch
5:23 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In Stories Of Muslim Identity, Playwright Explores Fault Lines Of Faith

Between Eli and Zarina (Greg Keller and Nadine Malouf), a family's Muslim faith undergoes rupture and renewal.
Erin Baiano Courtesy of Lincoln Center Theater

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 8:54 pm

Ayad Akhtar is a novelist, actor and screenwriter. And when his first play, Disgraced, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2013, he also became one of the most talked about new voices in American theater.

Long before this buzz, though, Akhtar grew up in a Muslim family with roots in Pakistan. He mines this background to bring the inner lives and conflicts of Muslim Americans to the stage. His plays often feature cutting dialogue and confrontations steeped in the tension between Islamic tradition and personal evolution.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Signs Emerge Of A Compromise On Obama's $3.7B Immmigration Request

Immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally are stopped in Granjeno, Texas, on June 25. President Obama asked Congress this week for $3.7 billion to cope with thousands of minors from Central America who are illegally crossing the U.S. border.
Eric Gay AP

A compromise appears to be emerging between Congress and the White House that would lead to the swift deportation of thousands of minors from Central America who have illegally crossed the border into the U.S.

Read more
Business
4:59 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Picketing Truckers Raise Tensions At LA Port Amid Dockworker Talks

Picketers supporting independent truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach stand outside a container terminal.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:04 pm

Labor tensions are high at the largest port complex in the country — Los Angeles and Long Beach — which handles nearly half of all the cargo coming into the United States.

Short-haul truck drivers are striking. They're the independent, contract truckers who bring the containers off the ships to nearby warehouses for companies like Wal-Mart and Costco. At the twin ports, their numbers hover around 10,000.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:39 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

KizON went on sale in South Korea this week, with North America and Europe to follow later this year. Its price has not yet been announced.
LG

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:51 pm

I was always thankful that my parents didn't "leash me" at the mall or grocery store when I was a child — but you'll never guess what parents can strap on their kids nowadays.

LG Electronics introduced a device Wednesday called the KizON. Meant for those in preschool and primary school, it's essentially a kid-tracking wristband.

Read more
The Salt
4:33 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Alcohol Test: Does Eating Yeast Keep You From Getting Drunk?

The idea that it might be possible to keep drinking a delicious bottle of pinot noir or tall bottle of beer and go right back to work is a tempting one.
Alex Eben Meyer for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 6:52 pm

Sometimes we drink with the sole purpose of relaxing, or drowning the week's worries. But other times we just want to savor a special craft beer or vintage wine, or make that good meal taste even better.

And as we get older, we're warier of that third or fourth glass. The consequences of too much alcohol — the drowsiness, the confusion and the wobbling — are a bigger hindrance. And let's face it: A hangover at 36 isn't the same as one at 22.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:33 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

No Charges For Police Who Killed Woman After D.C. Chase

Capitol Hill police officers look at a car belonging to Miriam Carey after she was shot and killed on Oct. 3 following a high-speed car chase that started near the White House.
Charles Dharapak AP

The Justice Department has decided not to bring criminal charges against two police who shot and killed a woman after a wild car chase from the White House to the grounds of the U.S. Capitol last fall.

The woman, 34-year-old Miriam Carey of Stanford, Conn., struck a security officer with her car near the White House on Oct. 3 before driving off at high speed. Carey's 1-year-old daughter was in the car at the time of the incident but was unharmed.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:32 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Doctors Face Ethical Issues In Benching Kids With Concussions

If parents won't bench a child after a concussion, is it OK for the doctor to tell the coach?
iStockphoto

Doctors have gotten much better at diagnosing and treating sports-related concussions, which is a good thing since Americans suffer up to 4 million sports-related concussions a year.

But we're not so good at is following their advice.

Student athletes and parents sometimes balk at doctors' recommendations to avoid play until concussion symptoms are gone, or to cut back on schoolwork. Both have been shown to speed recovery, and getting another hit on a vulnerable brain increases the risk of long-term problems.

Read more
Medical Treatments
4:18 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

HIV Returns In Infected Toddler, Dashing Hopes Of Imminent Cure

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:04 pm

Federal officials have announced that a young Mississippi girl, once thought to have been cured of HIV, now once again has detectable levels of the virus. This is a setback not just for the child, but also for hope of eradicating HIV in infants with a potent mix of drugs at birth.

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:16 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Ducks Do It Differently, And Science Wants You To Know About It

A duck with secrets that only science can uncover.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 5:09 pm

Scientists who carry out basic research sometimes find themselves unexpectedly caught up in a web of vitriolic public attacks by politicians pretending to expose foolish, dollar-wasting projects. Patricia Brennan, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, found this out the hard way.

Read more
Politics
4:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In The High Drama Of Its 1964 Convention, GOP Hung A Right Turn

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:04 pm

In advance of the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Republican Convention, Robert Siegel speaks with The New York Times writer-at-large Sam Tanenhaus. They discuss the impact that the Civil Rights Act, passed earlier that year, had on the nomination of Barry Goldwater.

Parallels
4:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

In West Africa, Officials Target Ignorance And Fear Over Ebola

Government health workers administer blood tests to check for the Ebola virus in Kenema, Sierra Leone, June 25.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:04 pm

There's growing concern in West Africa about the spread of the Ebola virus that has killed hundreds of people. Health ministers have formed a regional response, but fear and a lack of knowledge about Ebola threaten their efforts.

Liberian musicians are joining the campaign, taking to song to educate people about the Ebola virus. Their tune is called "Ebola in Town," and warns people to beware of close contact with those who fall ill. The song warns, "Don't touch your friend."

Read more
Around the Nation
4:02 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

The Hopes And Hazards Of The 17-Story Water Slide

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:04 pm

Kansas City now boasts the world's tallest water slide. At about 17 stories high, the slide had been postponed multiple times during construction after tests went bad. As Frank Morris of KCUR reports, the slide is attracting thrill-seekers and naysayers alike.

Read more
New England News
3:36 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

7 Dead In Lowell Apartment Fire

Firefighters work the scene of of fire in Lowell.

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:49 pm

Authorities say four adults and three children have died in a fast-moving Massachusetts apartment fire, and nine others have been hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries.

Middlesex District Attorney Marian Ryan is pledging to conduct a "long and thorough review" into Thursday morning's fire in Lowell that had tenants jump or hand children to safety.

She says it will be a "fairly long time" before the victims are identified.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:34 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Why HIV Spreads Less Easily In Heterosexual Couples

HIV particles (red) invade a human immune cell. When HIV is transmitted through sex, only the strongest versions of the virus establish long-term infection.
Chris Bjornberg/ScienceSource

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:07 pm

HIV is sexist.

A woman is twice as likely to catch the virus from an infected partner in a heterosexual relationship than a man is.

And homosexual men are at even greater risk. They're more than 20 times as likely to get infected from an HIV-positive partner than partners in a heterosexual relationship.

Now scientists at Microsoft Research and the Zambia-Emory HIV Project have a clue about why these disparities exist.

Read more

Pages