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In a ruling seen as a major victory for privacy rights in the digital age, the U.S. Supreme Court this morning has ruled that police need a search warrant to track people's cellphone locations. For more on what this means, we're joined by NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Nina, thanks for being here.

NINA TOTENBERG, BYLINE: My pleasure.

MARTIN: On its face, this seems like a highly consequential ruling.

ABC canceled its lucrative reboot of Roseanne in late May, after star Roseanne Barr published a tweet that compared Valerie Jarrett, a former aide to President Barack Obama, to an ape. ABC Entertainment president Channing Dungey called the tweet "abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values." It looked like the network was willing to take a financial hit and part with a successful property in the name of, of all things, principle.

Not so fast.

More than $3 billion worth of U.S. goods — from bourbon and corn to Harley-Davidson motorcycles — are now subject to a 25 percent tariff in the European Union, in retaliation for the Trump administration's tariffs that hit the EU, Mexico and Canada this month.

"The trade that we believe in is built on rules, trust and reliable partnership," Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the EU Commission, said in a speech in Dublin on Thursday night. "The United States' decision to impose tariffs on Europe goes against that. In fact, it goes against all logic and history."

An Ohio man who has the hepatitis C virus was sentenced to 18 months in prison on June 14 for spitting at Cleveland police and medics, according to a news report.

After Hurricane Maria hit, many people were left without access to water, food and power. But when food came, it raised a host of health concerns.

As food aid began to arrive last fall, Twitter was full of complaints from recipients and their families expressing shock that the contents of relief boxes appear to be stuffed with items like candy bars, potted meat and cheese crackers.

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The Pentagon is being asked by the Department of Health and Human Services to provide temporary beds for up to 20,000 undocumented children. That bed space would be needed beginning in July and running through the end of the year.

Officials tell NPR that four bases are expected to provide space, including the Army's Fort Bliss base in El Paso, Texas. It's uncertain if there would be enough barracks space, so officials say that tents likely would have to be put up.

The controversy over President Trump's executive order to end the policy of separating migrant families who cross into the U.S. illegally is shifting to the courts.

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Conservative columnist Charles Krauthammer died yesterday at the age of 68.

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Krauthammer was a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist who wrote a regular column for The Washington Post. He was also a longtime contributor to Fox News.

Do you see a blue dress or a gold dress? Well, this time it's a green Zara jacket. And the color doesn't matter — it's what's written on the back in big white graffiti lettering: "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?"

Updated at 9:42 p.m. ET

Charles Krauthammer, the prominent Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post and commentator for the Fox News Channel, has died.

His death was confirmed by Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor for the Post. The cause of Krauthammer's death was cancer. He was 68.

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OK, so the Dow Jones tracks how 30 big companies are trading. These companies are all American, all blue-chip. This week's GE news got us wondering, why 30? And how relevant is the Dow these days as a measure of the health of the economy?

Children are plagued by the occasional certainty that there's a monster in their basement, if not right under their bed, and they're almost always wrong. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the follow-up to 2015's mediocre but hugely successful revival of the Jurassic franchise, is the exception that proves the rule.

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For the past two seasons, NFL players have been kneeling during the national anthem to protest racial inequalities in the criminal justice system. And President Trump has used some harsh language against those players.

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First Lady Melania Trump paid an unannounced visit to a detention center in Texas on Thursday, and at a cabinet meeting at the White House, President Trump said he is directing government agencies to reunite immigrant families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

NPR congressional correspondent Scott Detrow (@scottdetrow) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest.

Arizona’s Verde River has a lot of competing users: city dwellers, farmers, kayakers and environmentalists. They all want its water in different ways, but a new project aims to unite everyone over a glass of beer. A farm in Camp Verde, about 90 miles north of Phoenix, has planted a crop of malt barley to conserve water and give Arizona breweries a key ingredient to craft a truly local beer.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

First lady Melania Trump made an unannounced trip to the Southern U.S. border Thursday to visit children who entered the country illegally and see the centers where they are being detained.

The trip comes a day after President Trump signed an executive order ending his controversial policy of family separation for migrant families detained as they're crossing into the U.S. illegally at the Southern border.

The White House unveiled a plan Thursday to merge the Education and Labor departments into a single Cabinet agency: the Department of Education and the Workforce. The proposal is part of a 132-page document outlining a broad restructuring of the federal government. The changes would require congressional approval.

One summer's day a few years ago, my daughter and her friends piled into a car that one of them had recently gotten a license to drive. "Where are you going?" I asked with false calm. "We're driving up Wisconsin Avenue until it turns into Rockville Pike," my daughter said, naming some roads in and around Washington, D.C. "Then," she continued, "we're gonna keep on driving up Rockville Pike. We want to see what's at the end."

Much has been written about Donald Trump as a politician and as a businessman, but a new book by Vanity Fair journalist Emily Jane Fox looks at the president through a different lens: as the head of a family.

Fox's new book, Born Trump: Inside America's First Family, focuses on Trump's three marriages and five children — as well as on his relationship with son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner.

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