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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It takes courage to confront a bully, to talk openly about the pain they can inflict. Maybe that's why star athletes, celebrities and thousands of other people are embracing Keaton Jones, a student in Tennessee who talks about bullies that persecute him at school, in a video that went viral over the weekend.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill (@JohnHMerrill) talks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about his support for Roy Moore, who is running for a seat in the U.S. Senate and battling accusations of sexual misconduct with teenage girls when he was in his 30s.

Interview Highlights

On what kind of turnout he’s expecting

Screenwriter Scott Frank has written movies in a all kinds of genres, including crime noir (Get Shorty), thriller (Malice) and action/adventure (The Wolverine). But despite his extensive list of credits, he always felt there was one genre missing.

"I wanted to write a Western at some point in my career," he says. "I kept putting it off and putting it off, because they were very difficult economically to make in Hollywood."

President Trump has formally told NASA to send U.S. astronauts back to the moon.

"The directive I'm signing today will refocus America's space program on human exploration and discovery," he said.

Standing at the president's side as he signed "Space Policy Directive 1" on Monday was Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt, one of the last two humans to ever walk on the moon, in a mission that took place 45 years ago this week.

Firefighters made progress over the weekend in their effort to contain most of the fires in Southern California, but the Thomas Fire continues to grow. Now the fifth-largest in modern California history, the Thomas Fire began in Ventura County and has since crossed into Santa Barbara County, where it threatens the coast.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Lance Orozco (@KCLUNEWS), news director at KCLU, about the latest.

The off-Broadway hit “Spamilton,” which spoofs Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Hamilton,” is closing in New York, but there is a U.S. tour in the works, and plans for a possible run in London.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks backstage, with the show’s creator, Gerard Alessandrini (@ForbiddenGerard).

With the end of the year coming, tax experts are advising clients how to maximize their deductions — and there could be big changes coming with the pending tax law.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the report with CBS News’ Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), host of “Jill on Money” and the podcast “Better Off.”

People across the country move to the desert because of the warm winter weather. Desert conditions also bring major auto companies looking to test out brand new cars.

KJZZ’s Casey Kuhn (@CaseyAtTheDesk) reports how Arizona’s test tracks are a major part of the car business.

Throughout history, being on the receiving end of anything involving cavitation, a miniscule underwater implosion, has been bad news. Millions of years before humans discovered cavitation — and promptly began avoiding it, given its tendency to chew up machinery — the phenomenon has provided the shockwave and awe behind a punch so ridiculously violent that it's made the mantis shrimp a honey badger-esque Internet mascot.

Celebrity chef Mario Batali is stepping aside from directing his restaurants and taking leave from his TV cooking show following reports of sexual misconduct over a 20-year period.

The move was apparently spurred by a report published Monday morning on the dining and food website Eater, in which four women allege that Batali touched them inappropriately:

The latest jobs report from November showed more progress in the U.S. economy.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson and The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson (@DKThomp) look at which sectors did best in 2017, and discuss how much credit Donald Trump can take for the economic conditions.

Virginia Martin, lead news editor at Birmingham Watch, and Andrew Yeager (@andsygr), reporter at WBHM in Birmingham, talk with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about the special election in Alabama.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., said on Sunday that women who have accused President Trump of sexual harassment and assault "should be heard."

More than a dozen women came forward during the 2016 campaign with allegations of unwanted touching or kissing or other forms of sexual harassment.

Haley addressed the allegations on CBS's Face the Nation, after discussing North Korea's missile tests and the plan to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

In an era of "fake news" and "alternative facts," we now face a massive disconnect between what science thinks it understands about the world (i.e., global warming) and what some people want to believe is true.

But how does "science" come to know anything about anything? After all, what is science but a collection of people who call themselves scientists? So isn't it as flawed as everything else people create?

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New York state Governor Andrew Cuomo stood outside a New York City bus terminal and said today's rush-hour attack could've been worse.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New York state Governor Andrew Cuomo stood this morning outside the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan. In an underground passageway somewhere beneath Cuomo's feet, a man had set off a homemade suicide vest earlier in the morning.

Lyft is unveiling a new education program for drivers, offering access to discounted GED and college courses online. The move is an interesting experiment in the gig economy, where a growing class of workers receive zero benefits from a boss and yet competition for their time is fierce.

Many Lyft drivers see their work for the company as a stopgap measure, a flexible way to make money while they try to build a career.

The nominees for the 2018 Golden Globe Awards were announced early Monday morning in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Two pills to wipe out hookworm could cost you 4 cents. Or $400.

It just depends where you live.

The 4 cents is in Tanzania. That'll cover the two pills it takes to knock out the intestinal parasite. But in the United States, where hookworm has re-emerged, the price for two 200 mg tablets of albendazole can cost as much as $400.

If you usually ring in the holiday with a freshly cut evergreen, your reality this Christmas could very well be a scrawny Charlie Brown tree instead — or you may wind up paying more for a lush Fraser fir.

This year, there is a tree shortage. Most growers blame the tightened supply on the Great Recession, says Valerie Bauerlein, who covered the story for The Wall Street Journal.

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Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

New York City police say the suspect in Monday morning's explosion in a subway station tunnel near Times Square was wearing an improvised explosive device and that he suffered burns after it was detonated. Three other people sustained minor injuries.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Alabama Senator Richard Shelby made a statement yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

RICHARD SHELBY: I couldn't vote for Roy Moore. The state of Alabama deserves better.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

More than two weeks after Hondurans went to the polls to elect a new president, there is still no official winner. The current president holds a slight lead, but officials have yet to declare him the winner amid allegations of widespread fraud. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Saudi Arabia has announced that it will allow cinemas to open in the kingdom for the first time in decades as part of social and economic reforms undertaken by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

"Commercial cinemas will be allowed to operate in the kingdom as of early 2018, for the first time in more than 35 years," the culture and information ministry announced in a statement on Monday.

It said that the government would begin issuing cinema licenses immediately and that the first movie houses would be open by March.

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