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The wait wasn't long. Just hours after she checked into the hospital in early labor, the Duchess of Cambridge delivered a baby, Kensington Palace announced Saturday.

The baby weighed 8 lbs 3 oz and both mother and child are doing well, the palace added in by Twitter.

The baby is the fourth in line to the throne, behind grandfather Prince Charles, dad Prince William and brother Prince George, born in July 2013.

Officials have said the duchess and her husband did not know the gender of their second child.

Fans of the British royals are beside themselves with excitement.

Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, has checked into St. Mary's Hospital in London and is in the early stage of labor, the BBC is reporting.

This baby will be fourth in line to the throne, behind grandfather Prince Charles, dad Prince William and brother Prince George, born in July 2013.

Officials have said the duchess and her husband do not know the gender of their second child.

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you three reads.

From Eliza Barclay, a reporter and editor on NPR's Science Desk:

Over the past few weeks, the mystery of how Freddie Gray suffered a fatal injury to his spine began unraveling.

Gray died on April 19, 2015, a week after he was arrested by police. His death sparked daily protests in west Baltimore that boiled over into riots earlier this week.

Where is the aid?

That's what the people of the ancient city of Bhaktapur want to know.

The historic gate to old Bhaktapur is about the only thing still standing after the earthquake. The ornate temples have crumbled. Brick homes were reduced to rubble. People have lost everything, including loved ones.

People are living under tarps or out in the open, without running water or toilets. Some 70 people are living in an improvised hut. Flies are everywhere. People say they haven't had any help from the outside — no medicine, no food.

The surprise announcement of criminal charges in Baltimore Friday morning definitely got the attention of police officers. The decision has been welcomed by protesters, but it's causing dismay for law enforcement across the country.

For the first time since the Ebola virus was discovered in 1976, a woman has been found to have very likely contracted the virus through unprotected sex with a man who survived the disease.

A 44-year-old woman in Monrovia developed symptoms on March 14; Ebola was confirmed on March 20. Medical investigators ruled out all the usual transmission suspects: travel to or interaction with visitors from countries with Ebola; attending the funeral of a victim; or contact with people with symptoms.

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Now, more about the woman who's building the case against those six officers. Marilyn Mosby is 35 years old. She just took the office of chief prosecutor in Baltimore four months ago. NPR's Nurith Aizenman reports.

No Republican has ever won the White House without winning Ohio. That's exactly the argument Ohio Gov. John Kasich is making for why Republicans should choose him as their nominee in 2016.

"I will tell you that you can't be president if you don't win Ohio. That's not even a question," Kasich said Friday at a lunch with reporters in Washington sponsored by the Christian Science Monitor. Kasich is thinking about running for president and is trying to determine whether he has a viable path.

When Marilyn Mosby was elected in January as state's attorney for the city of Baltimore, it's unlikely she had any inkling that just four months later she would be thrust into the national spotlight.

But as Mosby stood behind a bank of microphones Friday and announced criminal charges - including murder and manslaughter — against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, it looked as though she was born into the job.

Itsaknockout, Ocho Ocho Ocho, Keen Ice and American Pharoah.

These are just a few of the oddly named thoroughbreds that will race Saturday at Churchill Downs in the 141st Kentucky Derby — the first leg of the Triple Crown series.

The names for these prize-winning racehorses might be whimsical, but the name-approval process is fairly dull and bureaucratic.

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Now, our Friday political conversation with columnists David Brooks of The New York Times and E J Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Good to see you both here.

E J DIONNE, BYLINE: Good to be with you.

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Transportation officials in the U.S. and Canada are imposing tougher safety standards on trains hauling crude oil.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx and Canada's Transport Minister Lisa Raitt announced Friday that shippers must use stronger tank cars to haul oil across North America by October 1. The new rules will also mandate the use of a controversial braking system on trains carrying crude.

Julia Turner of Slate joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to take a look at how the news is reverberating on social media, including a story about a mother who was caught on video hitting her son, after she says she saw him wearing a face mask and throwing a rock during riots in Baltimore.

An unusual coalition is forming in Congress to overhaul the Patriot Act and severely limit the government’s ability to bulk-collect Internet and phone records – programs that Edward Snowden exposed two years ago, to widespread outrage. NPR’s David Welna joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with details.

Baltimore’s top prosecutor has announced criminal charges against all six officers who were suspended following the death of Freddie Gray in police custody.

State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, in announcing the charges today, said, “No one is above the law.”

Mosby says the death of Gray, from an unexplained spinal injury, “was a homicide.” She says his arrest was illegal in the first place — and that his treatment in custody amounted to murder and manslaughter.

Numbers out this week from the Commerce Department showed the U.S. economy slowed to a near halt in the first quarter of the year, with gross domestic product growing just 0.2 percent.

That is a good indication that the current low inflation will likely not meet the Federal Reserve’s goal of 2 percent anytime soon, and in turn its commitment to near-zero percent interest rates is also likely here to stay.

In the early days of the Kentucky Derby, African-American jockeys were a significant presence in horse racing. But as times changed, so did their participation in the sport. Ja’Nel Johnson, from Here & Now contributor WFPL in Louisville, reports that many people think it’s unlikely that black jockeys will ever return to prominence in the sport they pioneered.

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd to talk about the return of Showtime’s ‘Penny Dreadful‘ on Sunday. The show offers much more than just cheap spooks.

The free music streaming service Grooveshark has closed down its service after a six-year legal battle with the music industry.

The closure of the service, owned by Escape Media, is part of a settlement with Universal Music Group, Sony Music and Warner Music Group, in which the company issued a formal apology in lieu of paying damages to the labels.

In 1992, the Lincoln Vault Oak was cut down to protect Abraham Lincoln’s burial vault.

At the president’s funeral in 1865, the tree stood just a few feet from the event, shading the funeral choir.

When the tree was finally cut down, local arborist Guy Sternberg salvaged the massive stump and began a dissection project that peeled back the layers of history to reveal clues about that day.

Sternberg speaks with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd about what he was able to learn.

 

David Wildstein, a former Port Authority official in New Jersey, pleaded guilty today to playing a role in shutting down lanes of traffic during rush hour on the George Washington Bridge, a move taken as political retribution against the Mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey, who refused to support New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s bid for re-election.

Wildstein was a known Christie ally, as well as one of the governor’s childhood friends.

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