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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

U.S.: Russia-Based Artillery Targeting Ukrainian Troops

Ukrainian troops camouflage their multiple rocket launcher at a checkpoint in Kryva Luka, in eastern Ukraine, earlier this month. The U.S. says Russia is planning to provide similar systems to the rebels.
Evgeniy Maloletka AP

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:20 pm

The U.S. says it has "new evidence" that Russian forces have been firing artillery across the border to attack Ukrainian military positions, and that Moscow is planning to ship powerful rocket artillery to the rebels it backs in the country's east.

"We have new evidence that the Russians intend to deliver heavier and more powerful multiple rocket launchers to the separatist forces in Ukraine, and have evidence that Russia is firing artillery from within Russia to attack Ukrainian military positions," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said during a daily briefing.

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Goats and Soda
2:58 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

This Suit Keeps Ebola Out — So How Can A Health Worker Catch It?

Protective gear runs from goggles and head covering to gloves and boots. This health worker was photographed leaving the isolation area at the treatment center in Kailahun, Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:56 pm

The fight against Ebola in West Africa suffered a setback Wednesday. Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, one of the top doctors treating patients, caught the virus, even though he was wearing protective gear.

"Even with the full protective clothing you put on," Khan has said, "you are at risk."

That statement made us wonder about those yellow and white suits you see in photos: Just how good are they at protecting health workers from the bodily fluids that can transmit the virus — vomit, blood, sweat, mucus?

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Central American Presidents Say U.S. Shares Responsibility For Migration Crisis

President of Honduras Juan Orlando Hernandez, left, delivers remarks on immigration beside President of Guatemala Otto Perez Molina.
Michael Reynolds EPA /LANDOV

The presidents of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador will meet with President Obama on Friday.

But before the meeting, the heads of state are making the rounds in Washington, telling their side of an immigration crisis that has driven tens of thousands of unaccompanied children to the U.S. border.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Simpsons Fans Gear Up For 'Simpsons World'

Here & Now host Meghna Chakrabarti plans to use "Simpsons World" to find every episode featuring Sideshow Bob. (Image credit: sideshowbobforever.tumblr.com)

In the wake of cable channel FX acquiring the rights to air all 552 episodes of “The Simpsons,” the network has announced plans to create an innovative online streaming service for every season of the show.

The website, affectionately titled “Simpsons World,” boasts features like episode-by-episode guides, playlists that match to your interests and — most excitingly — a search engine that allows fans to sort episodes by theme, quote and even character.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Former NFL Coach's Comment On Michael Sam Stirs Controversy

Vito Cammisano and NFL player Michael Sam attend the 2014 ESPYS at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on July 16, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Michael Buckner/Getty Images For ESPYS)

NFL training camps are opening and many eyes are on Michael Sam, the first openly gay player drafted by a pro team. He was picked by the St. Louis Rams, and recent comments by former NFL coach Tony Dungy have created some controversy.

Dungy told The Tampa Tribune he would not have drafted Sam, not because he’s gay, but because he “wouldn’t want to deal with all of it. It's not going to be totally smooth … things will happen.”

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Hillary Clinton Says 'The Reset Worked' With Russia

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was on NPR’s On Point today, and said “the reset worked” with Russia. That’s what Clinton called the Obama administration’s fresh relationship with Russia several years ago.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

ProPublica: Federal Health Insurance Exchange Activity Remains High

Andres Cuartas (L) sits with Mercedes Mujica an agent with Sunshine Life and Health Advisors as he purchases a health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of Americas on March 31, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Today is the last day for the first yearly sign-up period and Sunshine Life and Health saw a wait of four hours or more for people to see a health insurance advisor. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The number of people signing up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act was about 5 million on April 19, the end of the open-enrollment period.

Though media coverage of the numbers has faded since then, a new report by ProPublica shows there have been 1 million transactions since then — an unexpectedly high number.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Facebook Reports Surging Profits

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer and founder of Facebook Inc., attends the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference on July 10 in Sun Valley, Idaho. Many of the world's wealthiest and most powerful businessmen from media, finance, and technology attend the annual week-long conference which is in its 32nd year. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Facebook reported on Wednesday that its profit more than doubled and revenue topped estimates for the ninth straight quarter.

More than 60 percent of the social network’s ad revenue now comes from advertising on mobile devices, according to eMarketer, after earlier concerns that the site wouldn’t be able to do well on mobile devices.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

You Might Call This Story Sour Grapes

Wine fraud has existed as long as wine has been made, but Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. (Alessio Maffeis/Flickr)

It was an elaborate con involving wine and some of America’s wealthiest collectors.

Rudy Kurniawan is the first person to be tried and convicted for selling fake wine in the United States. He manufactured phony vintages in his kitchen and sold more than $35 million worth in 2006 alone.

The BBC’s business correspondent, Michelle Fleury, reports on the case as it moves towards sentencing.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Good Movies You Might Have Missed

The movie "Snowpiecer" opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you. (Courtesy)

The movie “Snowpiercer” opened to critical acclaim a few weeks ago, but you might have trouble finding it at a theater near you.

In fact, as Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr has noted, a number of good films have either not been released widely, or disappeared from movie theaters before audiences could discover them.

He shares a few of his recent favorites with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti, including “The Immigrant,” “Fading Gigolo,” “Land Ho!” and “Edge of Tomorrow.”

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Book Reviews
2:26 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

'Panic In A Suitcase' Puts A Fresh Spin On A Coming-To-America Story

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 4:45 pm

There's a wonderful 1982 memoir called An Orphan in History by the late Village Voice writer Paul Cowan. It's about Cowan's search for his European Jewish roots, and in it he says something about the sacrifices of older generations of immigrants that's always stayed with me. Cowan says: "Millions of immigrant families . . . left the economically and culturally confining Old World towns where they were raised, and paid for the freedom and prosperity this country offered with their pasts."

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Iraq
2:26 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Human Rights Watch Researcher Reports ISIS Abuses In Iraq

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 3:01 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

U.S.
1:33 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Hot Prisons Could Be Deadly For U.S. Inmates, Advocates Warn

Inmate dormitories at Louisiana State Penitentiary, such as this one photographed in July 2011, have heating in the winter and cooling by fans and open windows in the summer, but no air conditioning. A judge ruled earlier in this year that that constituted cruel and unusual punishment, but installation is on hold pending a state appeal.
Scott Threlkeld The Times-Picayune/Landov

Earlier this year, a prisoner with severe mental illness died in an overheated cell at Rikers Island, the biggest jail in New York City. The exact cause of Jerome Murdough's death is still under investigation, but the temperature in the cell when he was found was at least 100 degrees. His death called renewed attention to a long-standing problem: maintaining reasonable temperatures in jails and prisons.

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Zoo In Argentina Says 'Sad Bear' Too Old To Go To Canada

Arturo, the only polar bear in Argentina, lives in captivity at a zoo in Mendoza. The plight of the "sad bear" has spawned more than 400,000 signatures on a petition to get him moved to a "better life" in Canada.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 1:55 pm

Despite a public outcry that resulted in more than a half-million petition signatures and a personal appeal by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Arturo, Argentina's "sad bear," has been deemed too old to migrate to Canada.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:42 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Who Is Most To Blame For Climate Change?

Flooding in a cemetery on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands in December 2008.
Giff Johnson AFP/Getty Images

Here in southeastern Virginia, our biggest city, Norfolk, is saddled with an unwanted claim to fame. As The Washington Post has reported, Norfolk is the place "where normal tides have risen 1.5 feet over the past century and the sea is rising faster than anywhere else on the East Coast."

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