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With Bernie Sanders lopping hundreds of staffers from his campaign this week, it's easy to forget he has outraised and outspent Hillary Clinton every month this year. And not by just a little.

Sixteen U.S. service members have been disciplined after the Pentagon reviewed the U.S. airstrikes that killed 42 people at a civilian hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan, last fall.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports that none of the military personnel face criminal charges.

It's been a good week for employees of Chobani. They learned that they could eventually own about 10 percent of the rapidly expanding Greek yogurt company. That could potentially make millionaires of some workers, if the privately held company is sold or goes public.

It's a grand gesture, and reflects a rising trend in employee ownership.

The al-Quds hospital in Aleppo, Syria, is the latest health care facility to get blown apart.

The 34-bed hospital was tucked into the lower floors of a five-story building in the Sukkari neighborhood of Aleppo. Sandbags blocked the windows and fortified the entrance. Concrete apartment buildings pressed on either side of it. Late Wednesday night, witnesses say, a low-flying fighter jet unleashed a missile that smashed directly into the hospital.

In his lab at George Mason University in Virginia, Sean Luke has all kinds of robots: big ones with wheels; medium ones that look like humans. And then he has a couple of dozen that look like small, metal boxes.

He and his team at the Autonomous Robotics Lab are training those little ones to work together without the help of a human.

In the future, Luke and his team hope those little robots can work like ants — in teams of hundreds, for example, to build houses, or help search for survivors after a disaster.

The 2016 NFL draft starts tonight so here's our comprehensive first-round mock draft.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A strict new law governing foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in China may have some groups packing up and heading home if they can't meet the law's requirements or fall afoul of police who will have increased powers to monitor and control them.

The controversial measure was passed into law on Thursday and will take effect on Jan. 1, 2017, affecting thousands of foreign NGOs.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At first glance, real estate agent Theresa Mondale's listings don't sound too different from those of other agents trying to sell a piece of Montana paradise: 270 acres at the base of the Bitterroot Mountains completely surrounded by U.S. Forest Service land, stands of old growth fir and cedar trees, a spring with pure water.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In the southeastern Chinese city of Quanzhou, a well-known Buddhist monk named Fu Hou has been mummified and encased in gold leaf.

According to The Associated Press, it's "a practice reserved for holy men in some areas with strong Buddhist traditions" and was done to honor Fu Hou's dedication to the religion.

Li Ren, the Chongfu Temple's abbot, said that after the 94-year-old's death in 2012, "the monk's body was washed, treated by two mummification experts, and sealed inside a large pottery jar in a sitting position," according to the wire service.

A bipartisan group of senators has unveiled a new compromise plan to overhaul the way drug criminals are punished, making one last push for legislative reform before the presidential election all but forecloses action on Capitol Hill.

At a news conference Thursday, one of the plan's biggest supporters, Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., proclaimed, "This is the best chance in a generation to reform our federal drug sentencing law."

College graduates are leaving school with an average debt of $35,000 dollars. But there’s one place an increasing number of Americans are going to avoid that: Germany. In Colorado this year, 100 students are taking the German language college entrance test – the first step towards entering one of Germany's tuition-free state universities. Jenny Brundin from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio has more.

Legislation that supporters call “religious freedom bills” continue to be debated in state legislatures across the country. Yesterday, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam signed legislation that allows mental health counselors and therapists to refuse to treat patients based on religious objections or personal beliefs.

Businesses are playing an increasingly vocal role in the debates over these laws, which opponents say allow discrimination against people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.

In the second part of Here & Now’s conversation with HBO CEO Richard Plepler, host Jeremy Hobson asks him if movies are still HBO’s bread and butter, what their plans are for virtual reality and what was behind the “Sesame Street” move.

Interview Highlights: Richard Plepler

Is HBO exploring virtual reality for the future?

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is calling for state lawmakers to eliminate the statute of limitations for child sex crimes, following the sentencing yesterday of former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert to 15 months in prison for making illegal cash withdrawals.

Hastert was accused trying to pay off a former student who claimed that Hastert molested him decades ago when Hastert was his high school wrestling coach.

A hospital backed by Doctors Without Borders and the International Committee of the Red Cross was hit overnight by an airstrike in the Syrian city of Aleppo. Patients, children and doctors are among the dead.

More than 60 people have been killed in Aleppo in the last 24 hours, and the Red Cross is warning that the city is on the brink of a humanitarian disaster, with fighting once again intensifying there.

In an unexpected move, Republicans joined Democrats on the House Armed Services Committee to vote in favor of a proposal that would require young women to register for military conscription through the Selective Service System.

Republican Congressman Duncan Hunter of California sponsored the amendment, but voted against it, saying he only proposed the measure to raise questions about the recent policy change allowing women to serve in all combat roles.

Note: This video contains offensive and abusive language.

[Youtube]

Two Chicago-area sports journalists were tired of being the target of abusive online comments from men, so they gathered up the degrading tweets that had been directed at them and asked other men to read them to their faces. The result is a video that has been viewed more than a million times.

The Commerce Department reported today that the U.S. economy grew at its slowest quarterly rate in two years, with the GDP expanding just 0.5 percent. Consumers are cutting back on spending, and businesses on investments, as Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine explains to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

In the new film “The Congressman,” actor Treat Williams plays Charlie Winship, a Vietnam-era veteran turned U.S. congressman. The plot is based on the real life of Robert Mrazek, who represented Long Island, New York, from 1983 to 1993. But, as he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, he always wanted to be a filmmaker.

The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

As summer approaches, anxiety about Zika is growing in Gulf Coast states like Florida and Texas. The virus hasn't spread to mosquitoes in the region, and it may not, but experts are preparing nonetheless.

It might not have been a drone that struck a British Airways plane on April 17 after all.

British Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin told Parliament on Thursday that it was probably "not a drone incident," according to The Register, an online tech publication.

As America's population ages, we're going to be seeing a lot more of these kinds of books: I'm talking about memoirs, written by adult children, about the extreme adventures of caring for and reconnecting with their elderly parents.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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