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5:01 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

ESPN Backs Out Of Brain Injury Documentary After NFL Pressure

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 9:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. As a television network, ESPN pays billions of dollars to sports leagues for the right to show their games, but its reporters also cover those leagues. Those two roles came into conflict this week when ESPN announced it is pulling out of a project investigating the concussion crisis in the National Football League. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now, as he does most Fridays. Hey there, Stefan.

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Russia Bans Protests At Site Of Sochi Winter Games

Demonstrators protest against homophobia and repression of gays in Russia, in front of the Russian Embassy in Madrid on August 23, 2013.
Gerard Julien AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin issued an executive order that bans protests around the site of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi.

The AP reports Putin issued the 10-week ban along with other orders designed to tighten security. Of course, the ban comes amid international consternation about Russia's laws prohibiting people from publicly supporting "nontraditional relationships."

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NPR Story
3:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Fans Relish The Replacements Reunion

The Replacements are reuniting, briefly, for three shows. (The Replacements)

The Replacements were an unruly rock band that emerged from Minneapolis in the ’80s. They broke up in 1991 but are still much-beloved. This weekend they are playing their first show in more than 20 years. Here & Now producer Alex Ashlock is one of those devoted fans and he helps us understand why “Mats” fans are so excited about this.

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NPR Story
3:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

The Future Of Women's Rights In Afghanistan

An Afghan woman peers through the the eye slit of her burqa as she waits to try on a new burqa in shop in the old town of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 11, 2013. (Anja Niedringhaus/AP)

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 7:20 pm

As U.S. and NATO troops look to wind down operations in Afghanistan, some of the gains made in women’s rights there appear to be under increasing threat.

Two female parliamentarians and a female senator were attacked this month alone. And in July, a female police officer was shot dead in the southern province of Helmand.

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NPR Story
3:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

ESPN Drops TV Project On NFL Brain Injuries

This hit, Oct. 3, 2010, left the Cincinnati Bengals' Jordan Shipley (center) with a concussion, and the Cleveland Browns' T.J. Ward (right) with a fine. (Amy Sancetta/AP)

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 7:20 pm

ESPN is dropping its collaboration on a TV project about football league head injuries.

According to a New York Times report, the network is said to have received pressure from the NFL to withdraw from the Frontline documentary called “League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis,” about the risks of football injuries on the brain.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

U.S. Soldier Sentenced To Life In Afghan Village Attacks

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, foreground, is seen in a courtroom sketch earlier this week, as prosecutor Lt. Col. Jay Morse, right, speaks to the jury. Bales was sentenced to life in prison without parole Friday.
Peter Millett AP

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 4:14 pm

A military jury has sentenced Robert Bales, the U.S. Army staff sergeant who admitted to killing 16 Afghan civilians in 2012, to life in prison without parole. During the punishment hearings held this week, Bales was confronted by family members of victims and people who survived the attacks of March 11, 2012.

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The Protojournalist
2:45 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

News Letter: Swimming With 'The Fishy Fleet'

K-Sup, the Fishy Tomato, atop a car advocating stricter food labeling.
Daisy Alioto NPR

Dear Protojournalist,

Traveled from D.C. to Missouri in mid-August with "The Fishy Fleet" (an offshoot of anti-GMO protest group Occupy Monsanto). It was a convoy of 17 activists piled into a 1960s-era RV and 5 "fishy" cars with friendly looking frankenfood sculptures on top ...

Near Pittsburgh the fleet held up traffic when a toll booth attendant took a pix with her iPhone. One Ohio woman, who followed "Fishy Sugarbeet" into a gas station, proclaimed: "That's the freakiest thing I've seen in Perry County — lately!"...

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Shots - Health News
2:35 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

To Reduce Prejudice, Try Sharing Passions And Cultures

Sharing passions can help erase ethnic prejudice. No word if that includes a passion for NCAA basketball.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 10:17 am

People can become less prejudiced, but it's not entirely clear how we make the journey from hatred to acceptance.

Something as simple as a shared passion for The Catcher in the Rye can help, researchers say. So does getting an inside look at the other person's culture, even if only for a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
2:09 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Gunman Found Guilty On All Counts In Fort Hood Murder Rampage

Army Maj. Nidal Hasan is seen in a booking photo after being moved to the Bell County Jail on April 9, 2010, in Belton, Texas.
Bell County Sheriff's Office handout Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 3:41 pm

A military jury has returned a guilty verdict on multiple counts of murder and attempted murder against Maj. Nidal Hasan, the U.S. Army psychiatrist accused in the November 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood.

The attack at the Texas military base killed 13 people and wounded 32 others.

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Drop In New Home Sales May Be Sign Higher Rates Are Biting

The scene earlier this year at a home construction site in Phoenix.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Proving once again that when it comes to economic data there's almost always a "but" to watch out for:

The housing sector has been one of the economy's stars in recent months, as we said Thursday when the news broke that sales of existing homes rose an estimated 6.5 percent in July from June.

But ...

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The Two-Way
1:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Why It's Difficult To Find Full Video Of King's Historic Speech

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963, in Washington.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 12:11 pm

As thousands gather in Washington over the next week to the mark the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, you may be moved to look for video of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream Speech," which he delivered in front of the Lincoln Memorial during that march.

It might surprise you that it is actually quite hard to find — because while many copies have been uploaded to Internet video sites, many have also been taken down.

Why, you ask? It's all about copyright.

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Your Health
1:40 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Study Correlates Copper Intake and Alzheimer's in Mice

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 4:26 pm

Reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers write of a possible link between copper in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease in mice. Lead author Rashid Deane discusses the potential mechanism.

The Two-Way
1:19 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Bill For Three Years In Airport Parking Lot? $106,000

A "Denver Boot" wheel lock attached to a car in a parking lot at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.
Tim Boyle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 3:17 pm

Chicago resident Jennifer Fitzgerald has finally settled her airport parking tickets — $106,000 worth of them.

But she'll pay just a small fraction of what she originally owed under a deal she's reached for a car registered in her name that was left for nearly three years in an employee parking lot at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport.

According to a lawsuit that was dismissed last week, Fitzgerald's ex-beau, Brandon Preveau, who worked at O'Hare, abandoned the 1995 Chevrolet Monte Carlo, where it began collecting tickets on Nov. 17, 2009.

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Remembrances
1:15 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Fresh Air Remembers Crime Novelist Elmore Leonard

Elmore Leonard published 46 novels over a career that lasted more than 60 years.
Vince Bucci Getty Images

Prolific crime novelist Elmore Leonard died Tuesday at the age of 87. Leonard was known for crisp dialogue and memorable villains. "The bad guys are the fun guys," he said in a 1983 interview. "The only people I have trouble with are the so-called normal types."

Many of Leonard's books and short stories were adapted to films. Those books include Get Shorty, The Big Bounce and Rum Punch, which became the Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown. His short story "Fire in the Hole" was the basis for the FX TV series Justified.

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Movie Reviews
1:15 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Boozy Bromance 'World's End' Rises Above Its Lowbrow Tactics

Nick Frost (from left), Eddie Marsan, Simon Pegg, Paddy Considine and Martin Freeman play a group of friends who reunite for a pub crawl challenge in The World's End.
Laurie Sparham Focus Features

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 3:30 pm

The World's End is a world-shaking, genre-bending, sci-fi comedy, and a splendid capper to what British writer-director Edgar Wright and actor-writer Simon Pegg call their "Cornetto trilogy," for an ice cream they eat on their side of the Atlantic. This one's arguably the best of the three, but who wants to argue over gorgeous satires like Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World's End? It's like ice cream flavors: Have them all.

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