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Around the Nation
7:22 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Not So Unusual: Bat Found At Atlanta's Turner Field

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. When I go to the ballgame I expect to see a lot of bats, and usually a couple of bat boys and even those bat boys carrying bats. Well, at Atlanta's Turner Field this week there was a strange bat next to the pitcher's mound. It was moving and flapping its wings.

Animals
7:18 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinese Zoo Substitutes Dog For Lion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Zoos are great for teaching kids about the different sounds that animals make. Monkeys go ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-oh-ah, horses go nay, and lions go woof. Wait. What? A mother, taking her son around a zoo in China, thought her boy was mistaken when he pointed out the barking lion. He was right. The zoo had taken their African lion away for breeding, and subbed in an employee's large, hairy dog. The mom felt cheated.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
7:13 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Book News: English Translation Of New Murakami Novel Expected In 2014

Haruki Murakami is also the author of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Norwegian Wood and Kafka on the Shore.
Elena Seibert Knopf

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:08 am
Fri August 16, 2013

NSA Has Broken Privacy Rules 'Thousands Of Times Each Year'

The National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.
Saul Loeb Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 8:57 am

The morning's major scoop comes from The Washington Post:

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Fri August 16, 2013

In Egypt: 'Day Of Rage' Adds To Body Count

A man in Cairo who said he had been wounded by a rubber bullet Friday gets help.
Andre Pain EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:55 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon, in Cairo, talks with host David Greene

(We updated the top of this post at 4:50 p.m. ET. For other updates, click here.)

With the Muslim Brotherhood marching in Cairo and other Egyptian cities in a "day of rage" over the deadly crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, this week's alarming body count went higher on Friday.

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Drought Forces Restrictions On Colorado River Water Releases

Relentless drought will force the government to cut back on water releases between Glen Canyon and Lake Mead. It's the first time that's happened since dams were built on the Colorado River. Reduction starts next year, and the announcement gives the 40 million water users in the Southwest time to plan.

Sports
5:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Fox Launches 24-Hour Sports Network On Saturday

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:39 am

For years, ESPN has been the dominant name in sports broadcasting, not to mention the most profitable bundle of channels on cable television. But it will face its first serious challenge when Fox launches its 24-hour national sports network.

Television
5:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Time Warner Cable Customers Miss Out On CBS

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:34 am

For two weeks, customers with Time Warner Cable in New York, Los Angeles and Dallas have been unable to watch CBS with their cable box. Time Warner and CBS disagree over how much the cable company should be paying the television network for transmitting its shows.

Around the Nation
5:45 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Oklahoma School Districts Consider Adding Storm Shelters

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday, this is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

Today is the first day of school for students in Moore, Oklahoma. It is a bittersweet return. Nearly three months ago, a tornado tore through that small community. The storm destroyed hundreds of buildings, including two elementary schools. Seven students and 18 other people died. The storm has fueled a debate about why there aren't more storm shelters in the heart of Tornado Alley. Across Oklahoma, there's no statewide plan to put shelters in schools.

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Race
5:29 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinatown's 'White Devil John' Sentenced To 20 Years

John Willis, also known as "White Devil John" in Cantonese, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges.
Jane Collins for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:29 pm

The conviction this week of mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger put an end to one of Boston's highest-profile crime sagas.

Less well-known, though, is the case of John Willis, a white man from Dorchester, Mass., who was sentenced in federal court on Thursday to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering.

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Business
5:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On C-Max Hybrid

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an EPA crackdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Ford Motor Company will reduce the fuel economy sticker on its new C-Max hybrid to 43 miles per gallon, down from its earlier estimate of 47.

As Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the change has generated a new review of fuel economy testing standards.

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NPR Story
5:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Doctors Without Borders To Pull Out Of Somalia

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Somalia is a country that has long been plagued by horrific violence, where even humanitarian groups are targeted. Just a month ago, two workers from Doctors Without Borders were released after 21 months in captivity. The group has had 16 staff killed in their 22 years operating in Somalia. Well, now Doctors Without Borders says it has had enough. For just the second time in its history, the group is completely pulling out of a country because of safety concerns.

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Food
2:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

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StoryCorps
2:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Happy Dodson (left) and Taz Roman are president and treasurer, respectively, of the Connecticut chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:36 am

Happy Dodson and Taz Roman are bikers. Not cyclists, but the leather jacket and chained wallet kind of bikers. They're also members of a group called Bikers Against Child Abuse.

The nonprofit, with chapters across the U.S. and in some parts of Europe, accepts referrals from parents, guardians, police, social workers and other agencies. Whenever those kids don't feel safe, they can call Happy, Taz and their other biker friends, who come straight to the child's house.

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All Tech Considered
2:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
ShareATT YouTube

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:31 pm

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