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4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Medical Discount Plan In Nevada Skips Insurers

Mounting medical debt and struggles with insurers led Shelley Toreson to drop her health insurance. She now pays discounted rates upfront for her medical needs.
Pauline Bartolone Capital Public Radio

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:19 pm

Shelley Toreson, who lives near Reno, Nev., had health insurance for years — but not anymore. Instead, she is part of an unusual Nevada nonprofit that helps connect 12,000 uninsured residents to doctors and hospitals that are willing to accept a lower, negotiated fee for their services.

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U.S.
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Red Cross For Rover: Inside America's Canine Blood Banks

At Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank in Purcellville, Va., dog holder Diane Garcia snuggles with one-year-old Doberman Leon as phlebotomist Rebecca Pearce taps his jugular vein to start the blood draw. Leon's "mom," Carrie Smalser, feeds him peanut butter, to keep him happily distracted and calm.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:55 pm

America is facing a blood shortage — a shortage of dog blood. Whether Fido tangles with a car and loses, or Barky contracts a blood-damaging disease, dogs — like their people — sometimes need transfusions. And while there's no centralized Red Cross for Rover, there are a few commercial canine blood banks across the country, and many veterinary schools do their own blood banking.

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Middle East
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sinai Peninsula Sees Increasing Violence Since Morsi Takeover

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2011, when demonstrators took to the streets of Cairo in peaceful protest against then-President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians in the Sinai Peninsula staged attacks on police stations. And while Cairo is still the scene of political conflict, in the Sinai, the conflict remains extremely violent.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Danny Strong: From 'Buffy' Extra To 'Butler' Screenwriter

Danny Strong at The Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Butler', on Monday, August 12, 2013 in Los Angeles. (Alexandra Wyman/Invision via AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Danny Strong went from being in the background in the cult favorite “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” to having an episode written for him and becoming one of the series’ villains.

Though he still acts, he’s become more well known as a screenwriter, winning two Emmys for his work on HBO’s “Game Change.”

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Bulger's Lawyers Will Appeal Murder Verdicts

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

James “Whitey” Bulger is facing life in prison after yesterday’s dramatic verdicts in his case in federal court in Boston.

The jury convicted him on 31 of 32 counts in a murder and racketeering trial that lasted nearly two months.

His sentencing hearing is scheduled for November 13, but his lawyers plan to appeal.

The verdict was overwhelming, but as WBUR’s David Boeri reports, nothing in the Bulger case is ever as straightforward as it might appear.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

What's Behind The Slowdown Of Emerging Markets?

Trader Michael Capolino, left, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013. Stocks are inching mostly higher in early trading on Wall Street after the government reported a pickup in retail sales last month. (Richard Drew/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Conventional investing wisdom over the past couple years was that emerging markets, such as China, India and Brazil, are volatile but vibrant, whereas developed markets are stable but sluggish.

But it looks like emerging markets might be losing their shine.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins us.

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Race
4:11 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Read The Most Important Bits From NYC's Stop-And-Frisk Ruling

U.S. District Court Judge Shira Scheindlin ruled New York City's stop-and-frisk policy unconstitutional, and said the practice, as applied, unfairly targeted blacks and Latinos.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:33 pm

Judge Shira Scheindlin has earned a reputation as an outspoken defender of civil liberties and a recurring foil for the New York City police. In her ruling in the closely watched stop-and-frisk case, Scheindlin criticized the police, and said the department discriminated against blacks and Latinos. She also said the police force has long ignored complaints about the way the tactic has been carried out.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sprites: A Rarely Seen Sky Phenomenon Caught On Camera

Sprites sparkle over Red Willow County, Neb., on Monday.
Jason Ahrns via Flickr

When thunderstorms emit lightning, we see the white, snaking electricity from the ground. But if you flew above the clouds, you would see a sky phenomenon known as sprites.

These are rarely seen bolts of red light that look like very fast burning sparklers. The Capital Weather Gang over at The Washington Post describes them like this:

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It's All Politics
3:09 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Star-Making Turn As Newark Mayor Launches Booker Toward D.C.

U.S. Senate candidate Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, N.J., speaks to the media after casting his ballot for the Senate primary on Tuesday.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:49 pm

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

'Elysium' Is Latest Film To Tackle Income Inequality

Max (Matt Damon) and Frey (Alice Braga) fight to get medical care for Frey's child in the film Elysium. (Sony Pictures)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Elysium,” the new movie starring Matt Damon and Jodie Foster, depicts a world where Earth is a destitute planet, covered in slums and plagued by disease, home to only the poorest of souls.

The more fortunate get to live on a space station called Elysium, where the air is pure and medical problems can be zapped with the flip of a switch.

This isn’t the first time that income inequality has been tackled on the big screen.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Little Known About Trial of Bo Xilai — Except The Result

Then Chongqing party secretary Bo Xilai attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, March 11, 2012. (Andy Wong/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

China is in a holding pattern, waiting for the trial of a former rising star in the Communist party, Bo Xilai.

Bo ran the city of Chongqing — a metropolis of 30 million people. He is being tried on corruption charges, including taking $3.3 million in bribes.

Bo is considered by Forbes to be the 10th richest man in China. He is also suspected of involvement in the killing of British business man Neil Heywood — for which his wife Gu Kailai has been convicted.

So far, authorities have not said exactly when the trial will begin, or detailed all the charges against Bo.

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NPR Story
2:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Prisoner Release Precedes Middle East Peace Talks

A man holds a sign that reads, "Red week, the Israeli government releases twenty six murderers," during a protest in Tel Aviv, Israel, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, as people protested Israel's decision to release 26 Palestinian prisoners, most of them held for deadly attacks, as part of a U.S.-brokered deal that led to a resumption of Mideast negotiations. (Tsafrir Abayov/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Israeli authorities are preparing to release a group of 26 Palestinian prisoners from jail in the next 24 hours.

It is a gesture intended to kick start a new round of negotiations.

Tomorrow, representatives of the Israeli government and the Palestinian authority will sit down together in Jerusalem and talk. The meeting will be chaired by the U.S.

The BBC’s Middle East correspondent, Kevin Connolly reports.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Would Some Marriages Be Better If Couples Signed 'Wedleases'?

To have and hold, to sign on the bottom line?
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:56 pm

"People marry and divorce as if getting married is the equivalent of the high school concept of going steady," says Florida lawyer Paul Rampell.

Which is why, as Rampell said Tuesday on Tell Me More, he's pitching the idea of "wedleases."

That is:

"A combination of the words wedlock and lease. Two people commit themselves to a marriage, to a written contract for a period of years. One year. Five years. Ten years. Whatever term suits them.

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The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Mary Cain, America's Teenage Phenom, Advances To 1,500m Final

Mary Cain of the United States competes in the Women's 1500 metres heats during Day Two of the 14th IAAF World Athletics Championships Moscow.
Julian Finney Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:06 pm

Mary Cain, the 17-year-old phenom who was the youngest female runner at the IAAF World Championships in track and field in Moscow, has stunned again by qualifying for the 1,500 meters final.

Perhaps Jason Gay, a sports columnist for The Wall Street Journal put it best, when he tweeted:

"Just amazing. The first Rio superstar is born. RT @ScottCacciola It looks like 17-year-old Mary Cain advances to the women's 1,500m final."

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Parenting
1:54 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Child Safety: Stranger Danger Warning Needs Updating

'Stranger Danger' used to be the mantra parents taught their kids to keep them safe. But now we're learning that strangers aren't the main problem - children are usually harmed by people they already know. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks child safety with a roundtable of experts and parents.

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