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3:15 am
Thu August 8, 2013

California's New Rules Could Change The Rideshare Game

In cities across the nation, people are turning to ridesharing apps like Lyft β€” whose cars are adorned with pink mustaches β€” instead of traditional cab companies.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 8:55 am

By now, you've probably heard of Internet-based ridesharing apps like Uber and Sidecar that let you hail a ride with the touch of a screen. They're often cheaper than taxis and because of that, they're in most major cities and their popularity is booming.

For years, cities and states β€” bodies that regulate transportation β€” have struggled to figure out what to do about them. Recently, California took the first steps towards legitimizing them.

In Los Angeles, Lyft is one of the biggest ride-sharing companies.

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Planet Money
3:13 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Egypt May Not Need Fighter Jets, But The U.S. Keeps Sending Them Anyway

An American F-16 fighter plane arrives at an airbase in Egypt on March 27, 1982.
Foley AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 1:51 pm

Every year, the U.S. Congress appropriates more than $1 billion in military aid to Egypt. But that money never gets to Egypt. It goes to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, then to a trust fund at the Treasury and, finally, out to U.S. military contractors that make the tanks and fighter jets that ultimately get sent to Egypt.

The U.S. started sending M1A1 Abrams tanks to Egypt in the late '80s. In all, the U.S. sent more than 1,000 tanks to Egypt since then β€” valued at some $3.9 billion β€” which Egypt maintains along with several thousand Soviet-era tanks.

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Music
2:03 am
Thu August 8, 2013

Reunited After 50 Years, An Algerian Buena Vista Social Club Makes Its U.S. Debut

Oud player Rachid Berkani, 76, is one of the musicians of El Gusto.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:31 am

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The Two-Way
6:35 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Military Veterans Accuse San Diego Mayor Of Sexual Harassment

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner entered a two-week behavioral therapy program on Monday.
Sam Hodgson Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 10:59 pm

Two military veterans are the latest women making allegations against San Diego Mayor Bob Filner.

Eldonna Fernandez, a retired master sergeant from the Air Force, and Gerri Tindley, an Army veteran, said Filner made unwanted advances back when Filner was serving his 10th term as a U.S. congressman in 2012. What's more, they told CNN in an interview, he did so knowing the two women had said they were raped while in the military.

CNN reports:

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Environment
6:18 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

EPA Wants To Allow Continued Wastewater Dumping In Wyoming

More than 40 years ago, the EPA banned oil companies from releasing wastewater into the environment, but made an exception for the arid West. If livestock and wildlife can use the water, companies can release it. Cows like these grazing near a stream of waste on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming are supposedly the reason the EPA lets oil companies release their waste into the environment.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 10:16 am

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to let oil companies continue to dump polluted wastewater on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. This includes chemicals that companies add to the wells during hydraulic fracturing, an engineering practice that makes wells produce more oil.

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U.S.
5:21 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

For One-Time Tech Exec, Leading D.C. Charity Is No Small Job

Patty Stonesifer once watched Martha's Table serve food to the homeless outside the Washington, D.C., offices of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. When the top post at the charity came open, she knew it was the job for her.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 6:43 pm

On a recent morning, Patty Stonesifer sat cross-legged on the floor of a day care classroom, laughing as pre-schoolers clambered into a fire truck made out of a cardboard carton.

This is a far cry from Stonesifer's old life. She made her fortune in the tech world, where she rose through the ranks at Microsoft to become its highest-ranking female executive.

Later, she became the founding CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation β€” the largest philanthropic organization in the world, with huge, global goals and an endowment of $34 billion when she left in 2008.

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Business
5:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The History β€” And Future β€” Of Cable's Bundling

Though you'd never see it listed on your monthly cable bill, nearly every channel you get has a secret price.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:13 pm

For Time Warner Cable customers in major cities, the battle for the future of television is playing out before their eyes.

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It's All Politics
5:13 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

4 Years After Fiery Town Halls, Activists Try To Revive Spark

Members of the audience argue before a town hall forum on the health care overhaul hosted by Rep. Jim Moran, D-Va., and former Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean, in Reston, Va., on Aug. 25, 2009.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 12:24 pm

It's been four years since protests of the president's health care agenda boiled over in town hall meetings around the country.

The summer of 2009 marked the rise of the Tea Party movement and set in motion the GOP takeover of the House of Representatives the following year.

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NPR Story
5:05 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

The Summer Of Ethan Hawke

Ethan Hawke at the premiere of the film "Before Midnight," at the 63rd annual Berlin Film Festival in February 2013 (Siebbi/commons.wikimedia.org)

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:39 pm

It’s been a great summer for actor Ethan Hawke.

β€œBefore Midnight,” the third installment in the series of films he made with actress Julie Delpy and filmmaker Richard Linklater, opened to wide critical acclaim, giving him undeniable indie credentials. (See trailers for all three films below.)

He also had had a number one hit at the box office with the horror film β€œThe Purge.”

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The Two-Way
5:02 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Monument To Hell' Is No More: Cleveland Rapist's House Is Torn Down

The house of Ariel Castro, which was found to have served as a prison for three women for years, was reduced to rubble Wednesday.
Brian Bull WCPN

The house of kidnapper and rapist Ariel Castro, the man who was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years last week, has been razed. Michelle Knight, one of the three women for whom the house became a prison for nearly a decade, was on hand for the demolition Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
4:35 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Obama Will Deliver Speech On Steps Of The Lincoln Memorial

Marine One flys over the Lincoln Memorial with President Bill Clinton on board as he departed from the National Mall in May of 1999.
Joyce Naltchayan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:40 pm

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the civil rights' movement March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, President Obama will deliver remarks from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, the White House said today.

It was on those same steps that 50 years ago on August 28, that Martin Luther King delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech.

The Washington Post explains:

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History
4:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

'Renaissance Garden' Highlights Medicinal Plants

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:48 pm

This summer, the New York Botanical Garden is featuring an exhibit called Wild Medicine: Healing Plants around the World. The most beautiful and interesting part is a small scale recreation of the 16th century Italian Renaissance Garden at Padua, the site of one of the earliest and most important medical schools. (This piece originally aired on Weekend Edition on July 6, 2013.)

Law
4:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Attorneys Assigned To Fort Hood Shooter Want To Back Out

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:48 pm

There was an unexpected hold-up on day two of the court martial of Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at Fort Hood. His "standby" attorneys have told the judge that don't believe it's ethical for them to keep assisting a man who they believe is trying to get the death penalty.

Arts & Life
4:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Libraries' Leading Roles: On Stage, On Screen And In Song

Poor Donna Reed: Her Mary would have ended up working in a library β€” shudder β€” if not for the matrimonial intervention of Jimmy Stewart's George Bailey. Happily, 1946's It's a Wonderful Life isn't the only lens through which pop culture assesses the worth of the institution and those who make it tick.
RKO Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:04 pm

When I was 9, I spent a lot of time at a public library just down the street; I was already a theater nerd, and it had a well-stocked theater section. Not just books, but original cast albums for Broadway shows old and new. One day, an addition: The Music Man, about a salesman who was crazy about a girl named, as one song put it, "Marrrrrrrion, madam librarian."

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Space
4:31 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Black Holes One Of Space's Great Paradoxes

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:48 pm

Late summer tends to be a slow month for news. But at All Things Considered, we put on a two hour program, no matter what. So β€” without a trace of irony β€” one of our science correspondents offered to help fill some holes in the show with a series of stories about holes. In this edition: Black holes.

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