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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Facebook Sees Its Shares Hit $38 IPO Price

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 4:36 pm

It's been more than a year since Facebook's stock debuted at $38 in its initial public offering. But after a problematic start and an eventual slide below $20, the company saw its shares reach that initial price in early trading Wednesday, one week after it reported strong advertising revenue.

"Before Wednesday's opening bell, the shares rose as high as $38.05, before settling back down to $37.95," the AP reports. "On Tuesday, the shares closed up 6 percent after coming within pennies of the IPO price."

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Monkey See
10:58 am
Wed July 31, 2013

10 Awkward, Unexpected, Or Otherwise Curious Press Tour Moments

Actors Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul speak onstage during the Breaking Bad panel on July 26.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

The Television Critics Association press tour, a two-week event in which press conference after press conference parades through a hotel ballroom, is about half over, so it's time for a few stories.

In a room of 250 or so reporters and a rotating set of actors, producers, and executives, there's likely to be a conversation here and there that perhaps doesn't go as everyone involved was expecting. After all, I've already been to 57 panel discussions or presentations (according to our transcripts list), and we have a week to go.

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Economy
10:41 am
Wed July 31, 2013

GDP Report Is Better Than Economists Expected

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts begins with some surprising economic growth.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The U.S. Commerce Department says the economy grew at an unexpectedly swift pace during the second quarter of the year. The Gross Domestic Product, or GDP, grew at an annual rate of 1.7 percent. That compares to the first quarter, when it grew at 1.1 percent. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, this might mean the economy has not been hit hard by the automatic government spending cuts known as sequestration.

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The Two-Way
9:17 am
Wed July 31, 2013

U.S. Economy: GDP Surprises, And Hiring Rises In July

A chart shows the quarterly growth of real GDP in the United States. The U.S. economy expanded more than analysts had expected, at an annualized rate of 1.7 percent.
Bureau of Economic Analysis

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:51 pm

The U.S. economy grew by an annualized rate of 1.7 percent in the second quarter of 2013, according to gross domestic product data released Wednesday morning. The Commerce Department says the rise stems from business investments, particularly in buildings, and an upturn in exports and the civilian aircraft industry.

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Wed July 31, 2013

U.S. Teenager Is Youngest Ever To Pass Britain's Bar Exams

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:23 pm

At 18 years old, American Gabrielle Turnquest has become the youngest person to pass Britain's Bar exams, qualifying her as a barrister. Turnquest is a native of Windermere, Fla. She studied for the exams at Britain's University of Law.

From London, NPR's Larry Miller reports for our Newscast unit:

"The average age to gain a barrister's qualification is 27. Turnquest says she's honored to be the youngest person to become a British barrister. Due to her parent's heritage, she is also called to the Bahamas bar.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Top Stories: Manning Sentencing; DEA Settles Abandonment Case

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:46 am

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:04 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Genetically Modified Organisms: To Eat Or Not To Eat?

An Argentine farmer stands by his field of trangenic soy, designed for resistance to drought and salinity.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Rarely is the relationship between science and everyone so direct as it is in the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), in particular foods. It is one thing to turn on your plasma TV or talk on your iPhone; it is an entirely different proposition to knowingly ingest something that has been modified in the lab.

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The Two-Way
7:52 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Student Left In DEA Cell For Days Reaches $4.1 Million Settlement

Daniel Chong spent more than four days in a federal holding cell without food or water.
K. C. Alfred U-T San Diego

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 11:43 am

Daniel Chong, the San Diego college student who spent more than four days in a Drug Enforcement Administration holding cell without food or water, has reached a $4.1 million settlement with the U.S. government. The DEA apologized to Chong last year and instituted a review of its practices.

The ordeal, in which Chong was forgotten in a cell after being taken in during a drug raid, caused Chong to become increasingly desperate. At one point, he said last year, he drank his own urine to survive.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Wed July 31, 2013

As Sentencing Phase Begins, Manning Could Face Decades In Prison

Former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning, found guilty of espionage and theft Tuesday, could face a lengthy prison sentence. A penalty hearing for Manning begins today.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:57 am

As the sentencing hearing for former Army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning begins today, he faces the possibility of spending many decades in prison. Manning was found guilty Tuesday of 19 counts for giving thousands of classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks.

Manning, 25, was acquitted of aiding the enemy, the most serious charge against him, which would have put him in jeopardy of a life sentence. He was found guilty of other serious charges, from theft to espionage, for his role in the largest leak of U.S. secrets in history.

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Book News: Booksellers Irate Over Obama's Amazon Visit

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Shots - Health News
7:09 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Last Person To Get Smallpox Dedicated His Life To Ending Polio

Ali Maow Maalin said he avoided getting the smallpox vaccine as a young man because he was afraid of needles. He didn't want others to make the same mistake with polio.
Courtesy of the World Health Organization

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:13 pm

So far, the human race has eliminated just one disease in history: smallpox. But it's on the cusp of adding a second virus — polio — to that list.

One special man in Somalia was at the battlefront of both eradication efforts. He died last week of a sudden illness at age 59.

Ali Maow Maalin was the last member of the general public — worldwide — to catch smallpox. And he spent the past decade working to end polio in Somalia.

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Movies
5:37 am
Wed July 31, 2013

It's Alive! 'Frankenstein' Poster Brings In Big Bucks

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's alive!

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's alive!

Animals
5:31 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Homepage Mistake May Get Kitten A Home

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Briefly on the Chicago Tribune homepage yesterday, the main story was a photo of an adorable, gray kitten. The headline read, quote, "Headline Test Here." It was, of course, a mistake, and Web managers took it down right away. But the screenshot made a lot of people grin, and the Trib says it could mean good fortune for kitty in the photo. He's Benton, a local cat up for adoption. And since his homepage stardom, he's been getting a lot of attention from potential adopters.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabwean Author On Mugabe's Quest To Hold On To Power

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Renee Montagne talks with Zimbabwean author Peter Godwin about Zimbabwe's presidential election and Robert Mugabe's quest to continue his grip on power.

NPR Story
4:55 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Zimbabweans To Cast Ballots In Presidential Race

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. People in Zimbabwe are voting today in a presidential election that features an incumbent who's been in office for 33 years. President Robert Mugabe is now 89 and has been in office since he led a rebellion freeing Zimbabwe from colonialism.

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