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5:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Leaders Draw Different Messages From Battle Of Gettysburg

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Our leaders have been commemorating Gettysburg ever since 1863 - most famously President Lincoln that November when he dedicated the cemetery there. Later, presidents and vice presidents have observed many anniversaries at Gettysburg. For the centennial in 1963, Lyndon Johnson, still the vice president, linked the Civil War to the civil rights movement.

PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON: One hundred years ago, a slave was freed. One hundred years later, the negro remains in bondage to the color of his skin.

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Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

"Liver buds" grow in petri dishes. The rudimentary organs are about 5 mm wide, or half the height of a classic Lego block.
Courtesy of Takanori Takebe/Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

Japanese scientists have cracked open a freaky new chapter in the sci-fi-meets-stem-cells era. A group in Yokohama reported it has grown a primitive liver in a petri dish using a person's skin cells.

The organ isn't complete. It's missing a few parts. And it will be years --maybe decades — before the technique reaches clinics.

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Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Arizona Firefighter Remembered For Loving His Job

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:25 pm

In Arizona, friends and family of the 19 firefighters killed in the Yarnell Hill Fire are sharing their memories.

Around the Nation
4:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hamper Summer Firefighting Efforts

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:13 pm

The wildfire season is expected to intensify and firefighters are facing it with decreasing resources. Federal budget cuts, including the sequester, mean fewer firefighters, less equipment and less spending on prevention.

History
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Celebrating The Expansion Of Our Nation

On July 4, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson announced the signing of the Louisiana Purchase, when the United States bought more than 800,000 square miles of land from the French. On this anniversary, guest host Celeste Headlee highlights some of the forgotten history around the purchase.

History
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

How Slavery Almost Made It Into The Declaration

More than any other day of the year, the Fourth of July is a time to take pride in American history. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Kenneth C. Davis about what you shouldn't forget this Independence Day.

The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Inventor Of Computer Mouse Dies; Doug Engelbart Was 88

This early version of the mouse (named for its tail-like cord) was assembled by Douglas Engelbart and his Stanford team in 1963.
Getty Images/Life

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:20 pm

U.S. inventor Doug Engelbart, the man known as the father of the computer mouse and a thinker who helped introduce other key innovations, died Wednesday morning at age 88. His death was announced today by the Computer History Museum.

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Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

A Surge In Painkiller Overdoses Among Women

Drugs found in the medicine chest are claiming more women's lives than cocaine and heroin.
Mark Gabrenya iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:52 am

Women are dying from overdoses of prescription painkillers at a much higher rate than men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And while men still suffer more overdoses, women are catching up fast.

From 1999 to 2010, the CDC found a fivefold increase in the number and rate of such cases among middle-aged women. Over the same period, the rate of overdoses from prescription painkillers increased 3.5 times in men.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:03 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

More Is Different: Nature's Unruly Complexity

Like layers in a pizza, each layer of material organization in Nature needs to be understood on its own terms and cannot be reduced to a base that explains the whole.
iStockphoto.com

According to reductionism, every system, no matter how complex, can be understood in terms of the behavior of its basic constituents. The focus is on the bottom layer of the material chain: matter is made of molecules; molecules of atoms; atoms of electrons, protons, and neutrons; protons and neutrons of quarks; we don't know if the buck stops here or not.

At the biological level, organisms are composed of organs; organs of cells; cells of organic macromolecules; those of many atoms, etc.

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Shots - Health News
4:02 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Delay For Insurance Mandate Pleases Businesses

President Obama talked up the Affordable Care Act in San Jose, Calif., in June. Now, the administration has said a key provision affecting businesses won't take effect until 2015.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 4:07 pm

The Obama administration's decision late Tuesday to postpone the requirement for employers with 50 or more workers to offer health coverage or risk fines has satisfied some key members of the coalition that supported the law.

But the one-year reprieve also raises new questions about the administration's ability to get the huge health law up and running in an orderly fashion. The deadline for the new health exchanges to begin enrolling individuals is Oct. 1.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:31 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The Innovative Mosaic Of American Symphonies

Conductor JoAnn Falletta.
Cheryl Gorski courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:34 pm

  • Hear JoAnn Falletta's Discussion With Robert Siegel

Our country's culture is a vast conglomeration of more than 200 years of influences from all over the world. We have taken what began as an extraordinary European tradition and expanded that legacy on American soil. We have added our essential egalitarianism, our love of experimentation, our inclusiveness and our boldness to the very form of the symphony. Americans have not been bound by one definition of the symphony, and composers have applied that formal name to pieces of varying length, structure and content.

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NPR Story
3:15 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Jobless Rates For Young Europeans Hit Record Levels

People queue to enter an unemployment registry office in Madrid, January, 2013. (Paul White/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 4:38 pm

Jobless rates for people between the ages of 18 to 25 are skyrocketing across the European Union.

EU leaders recently took a step to try to stem the tide by agreeing to pump $8 billion into job training programs for young people.

Young people in Greece are being hit especially hard. The unemployment rate for them is more than 60 percent.

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NPR Story
2:43 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Applying 'Moneyball' Methods To The NBA

Miami Heat's LeBron James (6) looks to move past Boston Celtics' Paul Pierce (34) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Boston, Monday, March 18, 2013. (Michael Dwyer/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 10:10 am

You’re probably familiar with the Brad Pitt movie, “Moneyball” — or the book it was based on by Michael Lewis. The financially strapped Oakland A’s, unable to afford the best players, put together a successful team using data analysis.

Houston native and Rockets fan Muthu Alagappan is trying to do the same for basketball.

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NPR Story
2:42 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Obamacare Employer Mandate Delayed A Year

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 4:38 pm

In a surprising move yesterday, the Obama administration announced a major delay in a critical part of the Affordable Care Act.

Now, large employers will have an extra year before they’ll be required to provide coverage for their workers or pay a penalty.

NPR’s health policy correspondent Julie Rovner joins us to explain the political implications, and what it means for people who are uninsured.

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NPR Story
2:40 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Researchers Grow 'Liver Buds' Using Stem Cells

Image of a mouse implanted with a "liver bud," from a 2012 video about the research at Yokohama City University. (YouTube screenshot)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 4:38 pm

Researchers have made a breakthrough in using stem cells to grow a human organ. That’s the report just out from the scientific journal Nature.

Japanese scientists led by Takanori Takebe of say they used stem cells to create “liver buds” — precursors of the liver. When the human liver buds were implanted in mice, they functioned a lot like a liver.

The shortage of organ donations highlights the need for finding other organ replacement therapies.

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