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3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Egyptian Americans React To Political Upheaval

Abrar Rageh is a junior scientist at University of Minnesota. (Abrar Rageh/LinkedIn)

More than 50 supporters of ousted president Mohammed Morsi were killed in an outburst of violence around the time of morning prayers on Monday, according to Egypt’s state news agency.

The violence erupted outside of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, where Morsi supports were holding a sit-in to demand his release. He’s under house arrest.

With so much in flux, what is it like for Egyptian Americans to watch this unfold? We hear from Abrar Rageh, a junior scientist at the University of Minnesota in the department of Opthamology.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Consumer Credit Expected To Rise, Fueled By Student Loans

New consumer credit numbers come out Monday afternoon, and the expectation is that consumer credit will rise, as it has for 20 straight months.

This has been fueled mainly by student loans, but it raises questions about how households can take on this debt, and whether they’ll see a return on their investment.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Nuclear Power: Fading Away Or Powering Up?

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:15 pm

After the disaster in the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan, many nations shelved their plans for increasing nuclear power generation.

But with growing concerns about global warming, some nations are now giving nuclear a second look.

One of the largest construction projects in the U.S. is just outside Augusta, Georgia. Two giant nuclear power plants are being built at a cost of about $14 billion.

Those two reactors are going up at the same time that two nuclear power stations in Southern California are being shut down permanently.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Deadly Rail Explosion Rekindles Rail Vs. Pipeline Debate

Smoke rises from railway cars that were carrying crude oil after derailing in downtown Lac Megantic, Quebec, Canada, Saturday, July 6, 2013. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP)

Investigators in the small town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, are searching for at least 40 missing people after a train transporting oil derailed and exploded over the weekend.

The explosion effectively incinerated the center of the town, which sits near the Maine border. Authorities are also struggling to identify the five people killed in the blaze.

Investigators have not yet determined how the train came loose after being parked outside the town, allowing it to speed nearly seven miles downhill into the town, where at least five of the cars exploded.

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All Tech Considered
3:06 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate

Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product.
Jennifer Rubinovitz Courtesy of Chris Barrett

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:36 pm

The Fourth of July holiday brought about another first for Google Glass, the computing device that you can wear on your face.

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The Salt
3:03 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The (Knockoff) Cronut

New York gave Chicago "the cronut," just as Chicago gave New York "Kanye West."
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:13 pm

By now, you've probably heard of cronuts, the half-doughnut, half-croissant pastry equivalent of a liger. They're so coveted, people line up for hours at the Dominique Ansel bakery in New York, where they're made, or they pay exorbitant sums on the cronut black market.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry Says He Won't Seek Re-Election In Texas

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 7:01 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he will not run for re-election in 2014, feeding speculation that he might again pursue the presidency as a Republican candidate in the 2016 race.

The governor made his announcement at a news conference Monday in San Antonio, which was carried live online by The Texas Tribune.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Krulwich Wonders...
2:04 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Where's My Dinner? It Was Here A Second Ago — The Sandpiper's Dilemma

Robert Krulwich NPR

They scuttle, peck, scuttle, peck, then they dash up the shoreline, dodging waves, heads down, concentrating. What are they doing? They're "looking for something, something, something," writes the poet Elisabeth Bishop.

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Parallels
1:59 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:36 pm

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A 'Mea Culpa'

Nina Totenberg
Steve Barrett NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:53 pm

I have always believed in correcting mistakes, especially bad ones. In my wrap-up piece at the end of the Supreme Court term, I quoted Northwestern University law professor John McGinnis as one of several conservative scholars highly critical of the court's decision on the Voting Rights Act.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

How To Garden In Drought And Heat

A volunteer at the USDA People's Garden tends to garlic. (Lance Cheung/USDA)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

With much of the country under drought conditions and temperatures soaring in the rest of the country, what is a backyard gardener to do?

Ahmed Hassan is a professional landscaper and former host of Turf Wars and Yard Crashers on the DIY network and HGTV. Hassan told Here & Now that the most important things to think about when prepping your garden for drought are the type of plants you use and how you treat your soil.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Buddhist Monk Confronts Japan's Suicide Culture

Alarmed by a rise in people jumping to their deaths in front of trains, Japanese railway operators are installing special blue lights above station platforms they hope will have a soothing effect and reduce suicides, Oct. 14, 2009. (Itsuo Inouye/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

Japan’s suicide rate is twice that of the United States. More than 30,000 people a year kill themselves in Japan.

So many people jump in front of subway trains that when a train stops between stations, people just assume it’s a suicide.

A Buddhist monk, Ittetsu Nemoto, decided he wanted to do something about that. He now works with depressed Japanese people who make the journey to his temple.

Larissa MacFarquhar, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote about Nemoto in a recent issue.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Fears Of Civil War In Egypt After 'Massacre'

An Egyptian man cries outside a morgue after carrying the corpse of his brother killed near the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 8, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

The only Islamist group to join the military in deposing the elected government of Mohammed Morsi says it will withdraw its support for the transition plan in response to what it calls a “massacre” of pro-Morsi supporters.

Egypt’s state news agency says at least 51 civilians are dead and over 400 injured after the Egyptian army opened fire on hundreds of Islamists who had been holding a sit-in outside the offices of the Republican Guard in Cairo.

The protesters were demanding that the army reinstate Mohammed Morsi to the presidency.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Politics This Week: Immigration, Student Loan Rates

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 3:27 pm

Congress is back from it’s Fourth of July recess. With only 15 laws passed so far this year, lawmakers will again take up immigration reform and the farm bill.

Senate Democrats are expected to hold a vote this week on a plan to extend the fixed 3.4 percent student loan rate for another year. The rate rose to 6.8 percent on July 1.

NPR’s senior Washington editor Ron Elving joins us for a preview of what to expect this week in politics.

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