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6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Chinese Manufacturing Activity Declines

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

Two surveys show China’s manufacturing weakened again in June amid a credit crunch and slower U.S. and European orders.

HSBC Corp. said Monday its monthly purchasing managers’ index declined to 48.2 from May’s 49.2 on a 50-point scale. Numbers below 50 show a contraction.

A separate measure by an industry group, the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing, showed activity declined to 50.1 from May’s 50.8.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

President Obama Makes Final Stop In Africa

U.S. President Barack Obama, center-right, and first lady Michelle Obama, right, wave as they enter State House accompanied by Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, center-left, and Tanzanian First Lady Salma Kikwete, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Monday, July 1, 2013. (Ben Curtis/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

President Barack Obama is visiting Tanzania on Monday, the last stop on his weeklong, three-country tour of sub-Saharan Africa. It’s the president’s second trip to the continent.

NPR’s White House correspondent Ari Shapiro has been traveling with the president, and he opens up his reporter’s notebook to give a glimpse into the trip.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Hotshots: What It's Like To Be An Elite Firefighter

Members of the Entiat Hotshots, based out of central Washington State, work on a spot still burning near Reserve, N.M., Thursday, June 7, 2012. (Brandon R. Oberhardt/U.S. Forest Service via AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

Most of us are learning a new meaning for the term “hotshot,” with the tragic news that 19 firefighters — most of them members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots – died fighting an out-of-control wildfire in Arizona yesterday.

The fire is believed to have been caused by a lightning strike on very dry brush and grass.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Egypt's Protesters Give Morsi Deadline To Leave

Egyptian protesters shout slogans and wave national flags during a demonstration against Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Monday, July 1, 2013. (Amr Nabil/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

Protesters stormed and ransacked the Cairo headquarters of President Mohammed Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood group early Monday.

The attack that could spark more violence as demonstrators gear up for a second day of mass rallies aimed at forcing the Islamist leader from power.

Organizers of the protests, meanwhile, gave Morsi until 5 p.m. on Tuesday to step down and called on the police and the military to clearly state their support for what the protest movement calls the popular will.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Singing Nuns Top Classical Charts

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

Angels and Saints at Epheseus” has topped Billboard’s classical charts for weeks.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Is It Still The Roberts Court?

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

After wrapping up the 2013 Supreme Court term, you’re probably up to your ears in Supreme Court coverage.

So instead of looking back at the major decisions, NPR’s legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg joins us to take a look at some of the personalities on the Supreme Court.

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NPR Story
6:13 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

San Francisco Strike Has Commuters Scrambling

(@franoero/Twitter)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

Hundreds of thousands of San Francisco area commuters are scrambling to get to their destinations on Monday, after the Bay Area Rapid Transit system (BART) went on strike for the first time since 1997.

Each side accuses the other of throwing in the towel early on negotiations, even after Governor Jerry Brown asked them to return to the negotiating table over the weekend.

Disputes center around economic issues: wages, contributions to pensions and health insurance payments.

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The Salt
6:11 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Taking High-Heat Tandoor Techniques To The Backyard Grill

Punjabi Lamb Kebabs, like many tandoor dishes, can also be made on gas or charcoal grills.
Christopher Hirsheimer

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:24 am

In America, summer grilling generally means heading to the backyard and throwing some hot dogs, burgers and maybe vegetable skewers on the fire. But in India and Pakistan, where summers last for seven months, grilling takes on a whole new level of sophistication.

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The Two-Way
5:58 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Pioneering Native American Leader Marge Anderson Dies

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 11:01 am

The first woman to lead a Minnesota Indian tribe has died. Marge Anderson led efforts to secure tribal hunting and fishing rights on Lake Mille Lacs. She died Saturday at age 81 of natural causes at the Mille Lacs Reservation in Onamia, Minn.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports:

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

BART Strike Hits Commuters; No Word On Service Resumption

The Fruitvale BART station is closed Monday due to a strike in Oakland, Calif. Negotiations between unions and management broke off late Sunday despite the request of California Gov. Jerry Brown in a last-ditch effort to reach a deal.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 7:03 pm

It's unclear Monday when the first strike in 16 years on the Bay Area Rapid Transit system may end, after BART said in a statement that it wasn't sure when talks with striking workers will resume.

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Shots - Health News
4:47 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Guidelines Aim To Clear Confusion Over Ear Tubes For Kids

You can probably chuck those ear plugs and enjoy the pool.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:28 am

Doctors have been putting in a lot of ear tubes. It's the most common outpatient surgery in children.

Despite how common the tubes are, it's been hard for parents to know if and when a child should get them. "Pediatricians are confused about it too," says Dr. Richard Rosenfeld, chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. "And ENT doctors."

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The Two-Way
4:47 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

The ZIP Code Turns 50 Today — Here Are 9 That Stand Out

Each black dot represents the geometric center of a ZIP code.
Matt Stiles U.S. Census Bureau

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:50 pm

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Zone Improvement Plan, the network of ZIP codes we use for everything from mail delivery to credit card security.

The U.S. Postal Service began using the five-digit codes on July 1, 1963, hoping they would improve the efficiency and speed of mail sorting. Since then, the codes have assumed a role in the identities of many Americans, helping to define where they live or work.

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The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Jury Acquits Man Who Wrote On Sidewalk With Chalk

Sidewalk chalk: A jury ruled Monday they aren't the tools of a criminal.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:03 am

Jeffrey Olson faced 13 years in jail for writing on a sidewalk with chalk. But a San Diego jury of two men and 10 women found him not guilty of criminal vandalism.

Olson, 40, was charged with 13 counts of vandalism for expressing his opinions on sidewalks outside three Bank of America branches. His messages, according to Gawker, included:

— "No Thanks, Big Banks"

— "Shame on Bank of America"

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Digital Life
4:44 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Kids Unplugged: Summer Camps Ban Electronics

Camp Sloane director Andrew Keener, staff and campers gather for an end of the year campfire last year.
Courtesy of Camp Sloane

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:31 pm

A decade ago, many summer camps nationwide started instituting a no-tech policy, banning cellphones, pagers and electronic games.

Camp Manitou-Lin in Middleville, Mich., had just started banning electronics at the start of summer in 2003.

Back then, 11-year-old Michael Lake of Grand Rapids was not so enthusiastic about the new policy. "I live on my Game Boy. When I get home, I'm going to need two packs of batteries," he said.

Cut to 2013, and the Xbox, Instagram, iPhone and iPad. Technology has dramatically changed, and yet some things have stayed the same.

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NPR Story
4:44 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Book Review: 'The Mehlis Report'

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Our book reviewer Alan Cheuse is excited to introduce the work of Rabee Jaber. He lives in Lebanon, and his novel "The Mehlis Report" takes place there. In Beirut, the characters await the real Mehlis report, which analyzed the watershed moment in Lebanon, the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.

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