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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Wed March 20, 2013

South Korea Eyes Pyongyang After Possible Cyber Attack

Members of the Korea Internet Security Agency check on cyberattacks at a briefing room Wednesday.
Jung Yeon-Je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 10:40 am

Computer networks at South Korea's three main broadcasters and major banks crashed simultaneously Wednesday, leading to speculation that it was caused by a North Korean cyberattack.

According to South Korea's Yonhap news agency:

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Around the Nation
8:31 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Arizona State's Sun Devil To Get Another Makeover

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with an update on Sparky, the Arizona State Sun Devil. The university mascot is a devil with a pitchfork and horns. He got a makeover with help from Disney. But as we've reported, this effort to make a friendlier, more accessible devil created a monster. Many students hate the new Sparky with an almost religious fervor, so the university has surrendered. Authorities will re-redesign the devil costume and let alumni and others vote on the design.

The Two-Way
8:31 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Former Gov. Mark Sanford, Stephen Colbert's Sister Advance After S.C. Primaries

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford in 2009.
Davis Turner Getty Images

The race to fill South Carolina's 1st Congressional District has gotten quite a bit of attention. Mostly because of the cast of politicians vying for the seat vacated when Tim Scott was appointed to Senate by Gov. Nikki Haley.

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Around the Nation
8:25 am
Wed March 20, 2013

$3 Flee Market Find Proves Valuable

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 7:03 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

We hear, occasionally, about a flea market find that turns out to be a valuable work of art. This morning the tale of a tiny Chinese bowl, pretty and looking like an open blossom. It was bought for $3 at a tag sale in New York. The bowl sat for several years on a mantel before the owner wondered where it came from, turns out the Song Dynasty a thousand years ago. Yesterday, the bowl sold at auction for $2.25 million.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
8:14 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Cyprus Scrambles For 'Plan B' Bailout

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gestures as she leaves a parliamentary session on Wednesday in Berlin.
Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 8:48 am

Cypriot politicians are busy trying to come up with an alternative plan to raise the cash needed to stave off a collapse of its banking sector after they unanimously rejected an international bailout package that would have imposed a levy on the nation's savings accounts.

Here's a quick look at some of Wednesday's developments:

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Mortar Training Suspended After Marines Die

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 8:16 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

One day after a mortar explosion killed at least seven Marines during a training exercise in Nevada, the Marine Corps suspended the use of 60-millimeter mortars, the kind involved in that accident. Several more Marines were injured.

NPR's Tom Bowman has more.

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Around the Nation
7:47 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Fracking Rule Delays Rile New Yorkers

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Horizontal hydro-fracking has transformed the energy market. Drillers get natural gas out of the ground by drilling down, then sideways, using water pressure to unlock energy - natural gas. But for all the money coming out of the ground in some places, the technique is contentious and New York does not allow it; which causes landowners to feel they're being left behind.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Arriving In Israel, Obama Reaffirms An 'Unbreakable Bond'

President Barack Obama is greeted by Israeli President Shimon Peres, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu upon his arrival ceremony at Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Wednesday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:20 am

President Obama landed in Israel this morning, marking the first time he visits the country as president.

"I see this visit as an opportunity to reaffirm the unbreakable bond between our nations, to restate America's unwavering commitment to Israel's security and to speak directly to the people of Israel and to your neighbors," Obama said during a welcoming ceremony at the Tel Aviv airport.

NPR's Larry Abramson, who's at the airport, just spoke to our Newscast unit. He said Obama was welcomed by Israeli President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Book News: Jane Goodall Apologizes For Lifted Passages In Her New Book

Primatologist Jane Goodall observes chimpanzees in 1997 at the Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary near Nanyuki, north of Nairobi, Kenya.
Jean-Marc Bouju AP

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:56 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Law
7:11 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Court:Reselling Books Bought Abroad Isn't A Copyright Violation

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with some books for resale.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Start reading now. The Supreme Court has ruled that buying books overseas and reselling them in the United States does not violate copyright law. Yesterday's six/three decision comes as a relief to companies like eBay and Costco that resell all sorts of foreign goods.

NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports.

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NPR Story
6:54 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Obama Begins Middle East Trip

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. President Obama is making his first visit to Israel since he's been in the White House. His past relations with Israel's government have not always gone well. Though the two nations insist they're reached new levels of security cooperation, they have publicly debated issues ranging from Iran to the Mideast peace process.

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NPR Story
6:54 am
Wed March 20, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Twinkies, Ho Hos and Ding Dongs will go to a pair of private equity firms. Wonder Bread will be sold to snack food maker Flowers Food. The Beefsteak brand of bread will go to a Mexican company.

NPR Story
6:54 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Dramatic Testimony Marks Start Of Guatemalan Genocide Trial

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's hear now about a dramatic trial in Guatemala. That country's former dictator is charged with genocide and crimes against humanity, stemming from the killings that happened in the early 1980s. Seventeen hundred indigenous Guatemalans - the Ixils people - died during one of the bloodiest periods of the country's three-decade-long war, a war that ultimately claimed more than 200,000 lives. At the time the U.S.-backed strongman, Ephraim Rios Montt, ruled the country.

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Sports
3:18 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Good Luck With That 'Perfect' March Madness Bracket. You'll Need It

Kansas center Jeff Withey (left) and Kentucky guard Darius Miller battle under the boards during the second half of the NCAA championship on April 2, 2012.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Basketball fans have one more day to fill out their March Madness brackets. They'll need to predict not just the champions and their route to victory, but also the paths of all the losers. It's not easy. In fact, no person or computer has yet been able to do it.

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Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
3:16 am
Wed March 20, 2013

How To Be The Good Guy With A Gun At School

Stockton Unified School District Police Officer Myra Franco and Chief Jim West patrol 50 schools in California's Central Valley region. One of the campuses was the site of a 1989 shooting massacre.
Richard Gonzales NPR

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:30 am

Ever since the Newtown, Ct., school shooting, there's been a raging debate over how to keep America's schoolchildren safe. National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre proposed stationing an armed guard in every school in the country. Critics said that idea was impractical and would be too expensive to carry out.

But many schools and school districts already have armed police officers. Since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, about one-third of the schools in the U.S. have added some kind of armed security, according to federal data.

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