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5:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Supreme Court: Human Genes Can't Be Patented

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:01 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, BYLINE: This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled human genes cannot be patented. The unanimous decision upends 30 years of gene patent awards granted by the U.S. Patent Office. It has enormous implications for the future of personalized medicine and in many ways, is likely to shape the future of science and technology. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports.

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Around the Nation
5:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

First Lives Lost In Colorado Wildfire

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Black Forest Fire outside Colorado Springs has now left two people dead. That fire has forced nearly 40,000 people to evacuate, and it's consumed over 300 homes since it was first ignited Monday afternoon. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports it's now the most destructive natural disaster in Colorado history.

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Middle East
4:14 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Can Captain Sunshine Save The Israeli Electric Car Dream?

American-Israeli solar entrepreneur Yosef Abramowitz, aka Captain Sunshine, speaks during a rally of electric car owners in Israel.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:19 am

Captain Sunshine wears a yellow yarmulke, yellow T-shirt and a bright-yellow cape held around his shoulders with a silky red ribbon. At a recent rally of about 200 electric-car owners in Israel, he called out questions to the crowd.

"We're saying to the government and to the army," he shouted through a squawky mic, "20 percent of your fleets should be electric cars. Do you agree?"

The crowd cheered yes.

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Parallels
3:20 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Friction Among Afghans A Threat To Post-U.S. Mission

A soldier from the 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, Manchus, looks toward the tree line through his rifle scope while on a foot patrol to visit Afghan Local Police in the Panjwai District of Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan. Panjwai is one of the most dangerous districts in Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 3:48 pm

The Afghan farmer in Panjwai District, outside the southern city of Kandahar, is finally fed up with the Taliban.

His name is Abdullah Razik. He's slight, with a trim beard and a dark green shirt that falls below his knees.

The Taliban plant roadside bombs in his fields, he says, and shoot near his house. The area is one of the most dangerous in Afghanistan — the birthplace of the Taliban.

Not long ago, something worse happened, Razik says.

"My friend ... lost his hand," he says. "The Taliban were putting IEDs in my village" four months ago.

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Planet Money
3:19 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Why More People Are Renting Tires

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:44 pm

"Oh, I checked every place in town, and they were outrageous," says Shannon Kelly. "It would be anywhere from $4[00] to $500, and I just don't have that right now."

Kelly had just walked into Rent N Roll, a rent-to-own tire store in Ocala, Fla. She was looking to rent a set of tires for her truck. Tire rental stores like this one have been around for a while, but until recently, most of their customers rented fancy rims. These days, it's becoming more common for the stores to rent simple tires to people who don't have the cash to buy tires outright.

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StoryCorps
2:44 am
Fri June 14, 2013

A Second Chance For A Father And Foster Son

Adrian Hawkins (left) with his foster father, Horace Atwater Jr., at a visit to StoryCorps in Atlanta. Horace took in Adrian when he was 14 years old.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:50 am

In 2004, Horace Atwater Jr. took in Adrian Hawkins as a foster child. Adrian was a teenager at the time, "this little, skinny kid, about 14," Horace recalls. "You didn't really have any clothes. You had mismatched socks."

Adrian had lived a difficult life as a child. He lived in several group and foster homes before moving in with Horace. "I remember times being hungry, seeing drugs and all kinds of stuff," Adrian tells Horace at StoryCorps in Atlanta. "I mean, some things had to happen for me to be in foster care."

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Middle East
7:37 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Chemical Weapons Use In Syria Crosses U.S. 'Red Line'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Obama administration has now joined France and Britain in concluding that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons against its own people. That crosses a red line that President Obama has repeatedly warned would change the U.S. calculation in Syria.

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The Two-Way
7:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Lost In 1968 Battle, Marine's Dog Tag Found Again

After a photo of Lanny Martinson's dog tag was placed on Facebook and elsewhere, Marines and veterans helped track him down. Martinson lost the tag in Vietnam in 1968.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:08 pm

Lanny Martinson was a 23-year-old Marine sergeant in Vietnam when he last held his dog tags. In the 45 years since, he thought they were gone forever, lost in the mad rush to save his life after he and other Marines walked into a minefield.

He'll soon be getting one of those dog tags back, after a network of people worked together to find the tag's owner. When they contacted him, Martinson was just at the point of filing papers to request new dog tags, all these years later.

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It's All Politics
6:59 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

5 Things To Know About America's Fastest-Growing Counties

A worker guides a crane in Watford City, N.D. Oil production has tripled in five years, leading to rapid growth in some of the state's counties.
Matthew Staver Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:16 pm

The U.S. Census Bureau released its list of the nation's 100 fastest-growing counties Thursday, and here's what we learned: They're mainly clustered in the South and West, and their rapid population gains are fueled by a wide variety of economic and cultural factors including the energy boom, military realignment, Hispanic immigration, student enrollment and changing retirement patterns.

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Business
6:35 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Unpaid No More: Interns Win Major Court Battle

Eric Glatt, a Georgetown Law student, poses on Wednesday, in Washington, D.C. Unpaid internships have long been a path of opportunity for students and recent grads. But a federal judge ruled this week that Fox Searchlight Pictures violated minimum wage and overtime laws by not paying interns who worked on production of the 2010 movie Black Swan. Glatt was one of the interns.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:36 pm

A federal court in New York has ruled that a group of interns at Fox Searchlight Pictures should have been paid for their work on the movie Black Swan. The decision may have broad implications for students looking for their first job.

Eric Glatt filed the federal lawsuit against Fox. He says everyone always told him taking an unpaid internship was the way to get his foot in the door in the film industry.

At Fox, he worked as an unpaid accounting clerk, he says — filing, getting signatures, running checks and handling petty cash — but he was working for nothing.

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Middle East
5:46 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Death Toll In Syria Jumps To Nearly 93,000

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The United Nations announced today that the death toll in Syria has jumped to nearly 93,000. Since last July, more than 5,000 people have been killed every month. And the numbers in reality are likely even higher.

They're compiled for the U.N. by a nonprofit group in San Francisco called the Human Rights Data Analysis Group. Researchers go through a complicated process, scouring eight different sources that document deaths. Megan Price led that study, and she joins us now to talk about it. Welcome to the program.

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The Two-Way
5:41 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Says It Has 'High Confidence' Syria Used Chemical Weapons

Syrian rebel fighters hold a position Thursday in the northwestern town of Maaret al-Numan. At least 93,000 people, including more than 6,500 children, have been killed in Syria's civil war.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:19 pm

The White House has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime is using chemical weapons against rebel forces, and the U.S. is prepared to offer military assistance to the opposition, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said that an estimated 100 to 150 Syrians have been killed in attacks using sarin gas, although the figure "is likely incomplete."

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

4 Exchanges You Should Listen To About NSA Surveillance

FBI Director Robert Mueller is sworn in on on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:12 pm

  • Mueller Responds To Nadler
  • Mueller Explains Importance Of Program
  • Mueller Explains Relation To Fourth Amendment
  • Mueller Responds To Collins

Today was round two on Capitol Hill.

After the Senate Appropriations Committee questioned the director of the National Security Agency, the House Judiciary Committee grilled FBI Director Robert Mueller.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:32 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Meet 'Ivan': The Gorilla Who Lived In A Shopping Mall

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:00 pm

The school year is drawing to a close, but NPR's Backseat Book Club has plenty of reading lined up for the summer. Our June pick is The One and Only Ivan, a Newbery Medal-winning book by Katherine Applegate. It tells the story of a gorilla who spent 27 years in a shopping mall in Tacoma, Wash. — and it's based on a true story.

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Law
5:28 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Tough New Gun Laws Drive Gun Makers To Move

Josh Fiorini's Connecticut-based company builds high-end semi-automatic rifles. He says the state's tough new gun law gives him no choice but to move.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:35 pm

Firearms manufacturers are pulling up stakes in at least two of the five states that enacted tough new guns laws following the school shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School last year.

In the months after those shootings, governors in New York, Connecticut and Maryland signed broad new bans on assault weapons. Delaware passed a law requiring universal background checks. Colorado adopted background checks and a ban on high-capacity magazines.

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