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The Two-Way
6:44 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

World War II-Era German Bomber Raised Near English Coast

A Dornier 17 bomber, which Germany used in the first years of World War II, is lowered onto a salvage barge in the English Channel, 70 years after the craft was shot down.
RAF Museum

A rare Dornier 17, an aluminum-skinned German bomber that flew in the Battle of Britain, has been salvaged from the murky waters of the English Channel. The plane was shot down more than 70 years ago near the coast of Kent.

"The Royal Air Force Museum is pleased to announce the successful lift of the only known example of the Dornier Do17," said the RAF Museum's director general, Peter Dye, Monday. He called the feat an "incredibly complex and delicate operation."

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The Salt
6:01 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Hey, Fellas, Olive Oil And Nuts Tied to Prostate Cancer Survival

Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:45 pm

Sometimes, it doesn't take a major diet overhaul to get significant health benefits. Small changes can be helpful, too.

This seems to be the take-home message from a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine linking olive oil and nuts to improved survival from prostate cancer.

Researchers studied the fat intake of more than 4,500 men who had been diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer (this is cancer that's still confined to the prostate gland and has not spread to another place in the body).

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Cooper Union Students Fight For Freedom From Tuition

An image of Cooper Union founder Peter Cooper is projected on the office of school President Jamshed Bharucha, in protest of the institution's decision to begin charging tuition.
Courtesy of The Illuminator

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

When students at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York took over the president's office one month ago to protest the school's decision to charge tuition, they painted the lobby black.

They also took a painting of the school's founder, and hung a piece of red fabric from the frame, as if Peter Cooper himself had joined in the protest.

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Shots - Health News
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus

Men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus.
Stringer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

The World Health Organization is warning health care workers everywhere to suspect a disease called Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, whenever they see a case of unexplained pneumonia.

Monday's warning comes at the end of a six-day WHO investigation in Saudi Arabia, where 40 of the 55 cases of the respiratory disease have occurred. Sixty percent of those people with known infections died.

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Music Interviews
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Jason Isbell: A 'Southeastern' Songwriter's Path To Sobriety

Jason Isbell's new album is called Southeastern.
Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 12:07 pm

There are a few things worth knowing about singer-songwriter Jason Isbell: The round softness of his speech comes from his roots in rural Alabama. He has lyrics from a Bob Dylan song inked on his forearm.

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Law
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Jury Selection Begins In George Zimmerman Trial

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Jury selection began today in the trial of George Zimmerman. He's the Neighborhood Watch volunteer who shot and killed an unarmed teenager named Trayvon Martin last year in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman tailed Martin through a row of townhouses on a rainy night, first in a truck, then on foot. Zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to a second-degree murder charge. He describes himself as Hispanic. Martin was African-American. And the racially-charged trial now centers on whether Zimmerman acted in self-defense.

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Around the Nation
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Outreach Meeting In Tenn. Clouded By Anti-Muslim Uproar

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 10:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Some communities in central Tennessee have been experiencing tension between Christians and Muslims. Those tensions erupted last week at a gathering intended to address discrimination against Muslims. It turned into a heated shouting match. The event was organized by the local U.S. attorney. He intended it as a discussion. Instead, he endured jeering from the crowd. Blake Farmer of member station WPLN tells us more.

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Television
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Summer No Longer A Time Of Drought For Television

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Summer's almost here. And that must mean it's time for - Audie.

CORNISH: More TV. New summer programming, right, Eric Deggans?

ERIC DEGGANS: That's right.

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Health Care
5:12 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Health Care Exchanges May Not Provide Many Options

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

It's not exactly a buyer's market for people who purchase their own health insurance. Prices can be high and options severely limited. A key piece of the Affordable Care Act is supposed to change that. New health exchanges will allow people to comparison shop for insurance, maybe even get a subsidy to help pay for it.

But as New Hampshire Public Radio's Todd Bookman reports, some people may still be left with few choices.

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The Two-Way
5:11 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

'I'm Not Satisfied': Family's First Graduate Has Bigger Goals

Recent high school graduate Dajina Bell got her diploma after working hard to turn around her GPA. An anonymous donor who heard her story on Colorado Public Radio set up a scholarship for her.
Jenny Bundin CPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:45 pm

When Denver teenager Dajina Bell graduated from high school last week, she celebrated a remarkable academic and personal comeback. Bell's high school years, marked early on by her brother's death and a host of other troubles, ended with her becoming her family's first graduate.

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Monkey See
4:57 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Shoes, Romance, And Art: A Reader Walks With The Books She Loves

Rudi's shoes.
@rudi_bee

Longtime readers know that one of my favorite pop-culture blogs ever invented is Smart Bitches Trashy Books, which offers a home for romance readers (who are legion) to both love their books and laugh at their books.

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The Salt
4:22 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

A Senate Catfight Over Catfish

These funny mustachioed fish are at the center of a farm bill fight in the House and Senate.
Sasha Radosavljevic iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:15 pm

The farm bill is expected to pass in the Senate on Monday night. And to the dismay of some, it likely won't include an amendment that would have eliminated a controversial program to keep a closer eye on a food product you probably weren't even worried about: catfish.

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Book Reviews
4:21 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Jeannette Walls' 'Silver Star' Lacks Spunk And Direction

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

"You've got spunk," Lou Grant says to Mary Richards on the very first episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. And then he adds, famously, "I hate spunk." The year is 1970, the same year in which Jeannette Walls set her new novel, The Silver Star. In the book, someone tells the 12-year-old narrator, Bean Holladay, that she's got spunk too. Maybe it's no coincidence. 1970, after all, was situated squarely in the middle of second-wave feminism. It was an era when women and girls were asserting themselves and finding their voices, which weren't always met with approval.

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Music
4:15 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The Creole Choir Of Cuba: Reviving Caribbean History In 'Santiman'

The Creole Choir of Cuba's latest album, Santiman, has a satisfying flow from celebration to solemnity.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

It might come as a surprise to learn that people of Haitian descent are the largest ethnic minority in Cuba. But that's the history behind The Creole Choir of Cuba, a vocal and percussion ensemble that performs songs about history, faith and social change in the Caribbean.

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The Picture Show
3:56 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

'Capturing Love': How To Photograph Same-Sex Weddings

A couple taking in the moment at the San Tan Valley Desert in Arizona.
Tammy Watson

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Summer means wedding season, and for many couples, photographing the groom lifting the bride, or the bride looking off wistfully into the distance is an essential. But what if the happy couple is a bride and a bride, or a groom and a groom?

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