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Shots - Health News
5:54 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

D.C. Agency Approves 2 High-Tech Cancer Centers

After months of heated debate, two of the biggest hospital systems in Washington, D.C., won approval Friday to build expensive proton beam centers for cancer treatment.

Together, the two high-tech expansions are expected to cost $153 million. The green light comes despite questions about whether the proton beam treatment is more effective than less expensive options.

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Around the Nation
5:49 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

In Ohio Town, Okla. Twister Conjures Echoes Of 1974 Disaster

In 1974, a young Xenia, Ohio, resident sweeps the slab of a house that was destroyed in a tornado that struck the town April 3.
AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

When a tornado roars into a populated area, the change is often drastic and deadly, and it happens within minutes. As the people of Oklahoma struggle to look beyond this month's devastating storms, residents of Xenia, Ohio, are reflecting on the tornado of 1974.

Xenia, in southwest Ohio near Dayton, became well-known to the nation that year. "Everywhere I go, and I've been all over the U.S., if I say I'm from Xenia people say, 'tornado,' " says Catherine Wilson, who runs the historical society in Xenia. She still gets a lot of questions about the twister.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

U.S., Russia At Odds Over Moscow's Plan To Arm Syria

A MIG-29 and its armaments on display at the military aerodrome at Vasylkiv near Kiev, Ukraine.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:48 pm

Russian media has hinted that Moscow could speed up delivery of S-300 surface-to-air missiles to Syria if the U.S. and its allies decide to impose a no-fly zone to aid rebels there. Meanwhile, a Russian airplane maker says Syria is discussing the purchase of additional MiG-29 fighters.

A Russian arms industry source quoted by Interfax news agency says Moscow could hasten delivery of the S-300 to Syria, even though the missiles would still take months to arrive.

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

'Atari Dump' Will Be Excavated, After Nearly 30 Years

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead.
Charlie Knoblock AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:59 pm

The New Mexico landfill or "Atari Dump" where the game console maker buried its mistakes — the biggest being the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — will be dug up by game developer Fuel Industries, which hopes to make a documentary about the project.

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Remembering Heroes Of The Second World War
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Army Nurse Mildred Manning: An 'Angel' POW With A Job To Do

Mildred Manning, then Mildred Dalton, was serving as a U.S. Army nurse in the Philippines when she was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in 1942.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

There were no "typical" tours of duty in World War II, but U.S. Army nurse Mildred Dalton Manning's was particularly extraordinary. Manning, along with six dozen other nurses, was held captive by the Japanese for almost three years. The group became known as the "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor."

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Author Interviews
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Sex Overseas: 'What Soldiers Do' Complicates WWII History

Cover of What Soldiers Do

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Americans often think of World War II as the "good war," but historian Mary Louise Roberts says her new book might make our understanding of that conflict "more truthful and more complex." The book, What Soldiers Do: Sex and the American GI in World War II France, tells the story of relations between American men and French women in Normandy and elsewhere.

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Movie Reviews
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Movie Reviews: What 'After Earth' And 'Kings' Have In Common

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Two movies open today that at first glance have little in common, the science fiction blockbuster "After Earth" and the suburban indie comedy "Kings of Summer." Leave it to our critic Bob Mondello to find similarities.

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Monkey See
4:39 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Rita Wilson On Life After 50: 'Get Ready, It's A Blast'

Rita Wilson, seen here performing in March, is the editor-at-large of the Huff/Post50 section of The Huffington Post.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Obama Pushes To Keep Student Loan Rates Down

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

President Obama says he wants Congress to keep student loan rates from doubling July 1st. If lawmakers don't act, those rates will jump from 3.4 to 6.8 percent. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports the president held a White House event this morning to increase the pressure.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: It was a steamy morning in the White House Rose Garden when President Obama stepped out in front of a group of college students and graduates. The president said it's inspiring to spend time with young people.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Latest Economic Forecast: A Whole Lot Of 'Meh'

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

We knew it couldn't last. We've been reporting some good news about the economy lately. The housing market has been doing quite well. Unemployment is high, but it's been falling. But today, the government released some key economic data and it suggests things are not quite as good as they seemed. Adam Davidson with NPR's Planet Money team joins us to explain. And, Adam, what did we learn today?

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Missile Shipment To Syria Complicates Kerry's Push For Peace

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. With the civil war raging in Syria, the U.S. and Russia are making another attempt to get on the same page about how to stop it. Diplomats meet in Geneva next week to try to salvage plans for a June peace conference. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, have run into problems ever since they announced that conference.

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The Two-Way
3:56 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Report Of Liquid Woolly Mammoth Blood Prompts Clone Talk

A file photo from 2011 shows a man touching a giant bronze sculpture of a mammoth in the Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk. A team of Russian and South Korean scientists who found a well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth carcass this month say it also included blood.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:38 pm

Scientists in Siberia say they've extracted blood samples from the carcass of a 10,000-year-old woolly mammoth, reviving speculation that a clone of the extinct animal might someday walk the earth, if scientists are able to find living cells. But researchers say the find, which also included well-preserved muscle tissue, must be studied further to know its potential.

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Code Switch
3:20 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Desis Dominate The National Spelling Bee

Arvind Mahankali won the 2013 National Spelling Bee after spelling the word "knaidel."
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 4:48 pm

When Arvind Mahankali won the Scripps-Howard National Spelling Bee last night, he became the sixth consecutive Indian-American winner and the 11th in the past 15 years.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Top Khmer Rouge Leaders Apologize For Regime's Atrocities

A Cambodian survivor of the infamous Tuol Sleng prison (known as S-21) poses by a picture of "Brother Number Two" Nuon Chea last year.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The top two surviving leaders of Cambodia's genocidal Khmer Rouge regime have expressed remorse for their actions while in power and acknowledged a degree of responsibility for the atrocities committed in their names.

Nuon Chea, the chief lieutenant of Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, who acted as head of state for the Maoist regime, are currently on trial for genocide and crimes against humanity.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:45 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

An Object Of Contention At The Venice Biennale

Il Palazzo Enciclopedico: A visitor puzzles over the multitude of choices offered by the the 55th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia. It runs from June 1 to November 24, 2013." href="/post/object-contention-venice-biennale" class="noexit lightbox">
Il Palazzo Enciclopedico: A visitor puzzles over the multitude of choices offered by the the 55th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia. It runs from June 1 to November 24, 2013.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

This is coming to you from Venice, where I am attending the opening of the Art Biennale.

I find myself interested in Tino Sehgal's live piece installed in one of the main galleries of the Giardini. If the piece has a title, it isn't posted anywhere. I say "live piece" rather than "performance" because the work itself seems crafted precisely to question the nature of performance.

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