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The Salt
12:59 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Israel's Rabbis Seek To Bend Pastries To Their Will

What's what? In Israel, the shape of a boureka pastry traditionally tells you what's inside. Now the country's chief rabbis want the shapes to get a lot more specific to help people keep kosher.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 8:18 am

Anyone who follows a particular diet knows the challenge of eating out. How do you know exactly what's in the food?

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Shots - Health News
12:53 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Prevention Pill Cuts HIV Risk For Injecting Drug Users

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says doctors should prescribe Truvada, a once-a-day pill for HIV, to help prevent infections in IV drug users.
Jeff Chiu AP

A once-a-day pill has been proven to lower the risk of getting HIV among needle-using drug addicts, just as it does among heterosexual couples and men who have sex with men.

Among 2,400 injecting drug users in Bangkok, those assigned to take a daily dose of an antiviral drug Viread, or tenofovir generically, had half the risk of getting HIV over a four-year period as those who took a placebo pill. Among those who took tenofovir faithfully, there were 74 percent fewer infections.

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The Salt
12:18 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Old McDonald Might Be A Lady: More Women Take Up Farming

Lisa Steketee restocks strawberries during the Laramie Farmers Market in Wyoming, in 2009.
Ben Woloszyn AP

More women are getting into farming, according to a recent analysis from the U.S Department of Agriculture.

The agency crunched numbers from the Agriculture Census and found that the number of U.S. farms operated by women nearly tripled over the past three decades, from 5 percent in 1978 to 14 percent by 2007.

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The Two-Way
12:17 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

One Dead, Dozens Hurt In Louisiana Chemical Plant Explosion

The plant on fire after it reportedly exploded Thursday in the town of Geismar, La.
Ryan Meador AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:40 pm

(This post last updated at 8:30 p.m. ET)

An explosion touched off a fire at a Louisiana petrochemical plant, killing at least one person and injuring more than 70 others, officials say.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Will Rain-Disrupted U.S. Open Be Too Easy Or Hard As Ever?

A man finds some shelter from the rain Thursday at the U.S. Open, which is being played at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:05 pm

After being suspended less than two hours after the first players teed off, play is set to resume early Thursday afternoon at the U.S. Open golf championship, which this year is being held at the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa., outside Philadelphia. Heavy rains forced the delay.

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin To Step Down

Surgeon General Regina Benjamin speaks on health disparities in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 5, 2012.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

After four years on the job, the nation's top doctor is leaving. U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin announced late Wednesay that she plans to step down next month.

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Music Reviews
12:03 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Slaid Cleaves: 'Still Fighting' With Smart Lyrics And Stories

Slaid Cleaves' music is influenced by singer-songwriters such as Woody Guthrie, Bruce Springsteen, Hank Williams and Johnny Cash.
Karen Cleaves Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:34 pm

Raised in South Berwick, Maine, and residing in Austin, Texas, Slaid Cleaves is no one's idea of a music-industry insider. He writes and sings songs primarily about working-class people and romantics both hopeful and hopeless. That said, it's also not difficult to hear another element of the fortysomething Cleaves' past: He was an English and philosophy major at Tufts, and his lyrics are underpinned by both a fine sense of meter and moral perspicacity.

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Shots - Health News
12:02 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Could Brain Scans Reveal The Right Treatment For Depression?

Talk therapy is best for some people; antidepressants are better for others. Scientists say PET scans might help figure out early on what treatment a person needs.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:39 pm

Finding the right treatment for depression can be a struggle. People find relief with the first treatment only 40 percent of the time. Trying different antidepressants or therapies can take months, which means months of suffering.

Scientists are trying to better the odds by searching for signals in the body or in behavior that could be signposts to the right treatment. Researchers at Emory University say that PET scans of the brain may help predict which people do better on SSRI antidepressants, and which would benefit most from cognitive behavioral therapy instead.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Positive Signs: Jobless Claims Drop, Retail Sales Rise

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 12:59 pm

The number of first-time claims for unemployment insurance has dropped back down to one of its lowest levels since January 2008, the Employment and Training Administration says.

According to that agency, there were 334,000 initial claims filed last week, down 12,000 from the week before.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Senate Rejects Measure To Delay 'Path To Citizenship'

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer from the Office of Field Operations watches in February as people cross from Mexico into the United States at Nogales, Ariz.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 12:36 pm

The Senate has defeated a Republican measure that would have blocked implementation of a "path to citizenship" for undocumented workers until after the U.S.-Mexico border has been deemed secure for a period of six months.

The amendment to the larger overhaul of U.S. immigration law was sponsored by Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley. It was defeated Thursday in a 57-43 vote.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:32 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Why Dolphins Make Us Nervous

Robert Krulwich NPR

What is it about dolphins? They have very, very big brains, and that makes we humans, whose brains are nothing to sniff at, nervous. We don't know what to make of them.

The latest example: On May 17 in India, the Ministry of Environment and Forests issued an order to all Indian states banning dolphin amusement parks. No leaping out of pools to catch balls, no jumping through hoops. Forcing dolphins to entertain humans, the ministry said, was morally unacceptable.

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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Natural DNA Cannot Be Patented, Supreme Court Rules

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:28 am

In a decision that could have broad-reaching effects on the future of science and medicine, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that:

-- "A naturally occurring DNA segment is a product of nature and not patent eligible merely because it has been isolated."

-- But, synthetically created "strands of nucleotides known as composite DNA (cDNA)" are "patent eligible" because they do not occur naturally.

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Shots - Health News
10:21 am
Thu June 13, 2013

New York Hospitals Shelve Rivalries For Proton Beam Project

An image with radiation doses from proton therapy superimposed.
Wikimedia Commons

During the recent debate in Washington, D.C., over whether to let to local competing hospital systems build rival proton beam therapy centers, an obvious question was raised: Why not team up?

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Gannett To Buy TV Station Owner Belo For $2.2 Billion

Gannett headquarters in McLean, Va.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 12:05 pm

Gannett Co. plans to buy TV station owner Belo for $1.5 billion in cash and $715 million in debt in a deal that will make it one of the nation's largest owners of network television affiliates.

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The Two-Way
9:55 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Turkey's Prime Minister Issues Warning To 'Lawbreakers'

A protestor with a gas mask uses a mobile phone to read the news on social media as demonstrators gather at midnight Thursday in Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park.
Ozan Kose AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:01 am

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a strong warning to the protesters camped out at Taksim Square in Istanbul.

He said that within 24 hours, the situation at the square would be resolved. As The New York Times reports, the tough talk was tempered with an olive branch of sorts: Erdogan hinted that a referendum could decide whether a mall would be built in place of a park next to the square.

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