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The Two-Way
6:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Indian On Hunger Strike For 12 Years Charged With Attempted Suicide

Activist Irom Sharmila is flanked by a policeman, left, and a supporter, on Monday in New Delhi. Sharmila has been on a hunger strike for 12 years to protest an Indian law that suspends many human rights protections in areas of conflict.
Tsering Topgyal AP

Hunger strikes are often used in India as a method of protest — but try being on one for 12 years.

That's how long it's been since Irom Sharmila last ate on her own. She is protesting an Indian law that suspends human rights guarantees in conflict-ridden parts of the country. The government is force-feeding her through a tube. And on Monday, Sharmila was charged with attempted suicide.

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The Two-Way
5:35 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

'Batman' Turns Over Wanted Man To Police In England

Batman brings in a wanted man to a police department in England.
West Yorkshire Police

Batman has apparently given up Gotham for a stint in the northern English town of Bradford.

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Commentary
5:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cologne: Cultural Choice Or Necessity?

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Can we keep evolving as we get older? That's a question comedian and commentator Kevin Heffernan decided to explore. And his approach to changing himself was an aromatic one.

KEVIN HEFFERNAN, BYLINE: Cologne, it's a life choice. Some say it's hereditary. If your dad did it, you will. Like what sports team you root for or circumcision. Some say it's cultural. Some say it's a necessity.

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Shots - Health News
5:18 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Got A Health Care Puzzle? There Should Be An App!

The GetHealth app was a runner-up at the recent Hackovate Health Innovation Competition held in Kansas City, Mo.
Courtesy of GetHealth Limited

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:41 pm

Kansas City, Mo., is looking to boost its health-tech cred.

So the city that's home to Cerner Corp. and other health information firms seemed a natural to host something called the Hackovate Health Innovation Competition.

A mashup of innovation and old-school hacking (though none of the participants was bent on doing harm, we're assured), the goal of the competition was to improve the nation's health system and help people navigate the complexities of the Affordable Care Act.

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U.S.
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Steamship Anchors A Community, But Its Days May Be Numbered

The nation's last coal-burning ferry, the SS Badger, sits on Lake Michigan in the port town of Ludington, Mich. The EPA permit that has long allowed the ship to dump coal ash into the lake is now under review.
Courtesy photo for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:50 pm

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the tiny town of Ludington, Mich., is home port to the last coal-fired ferry in the U.S. The SS Badger has been making trips across the lake to Manitowoc, Wis., during the good-weather months since 1953. And as it runs, the 411-foot ferry discharges coal ash slurry directly into the lake.

An Environmental Protection Agency permit allows the Badger to dump four tons of ash into the lake daily. But now, the agency has put the permit under review — and that means the Badger could stop sailing.

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The Salt
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

In Kazakhstan, No Horror At Horse Meat

Signs advertise the type of meat sold in each section of the Green Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
Sly06/Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:24 pm

Though the thought of horse meat in British lasagna or Ikea meatballs may be stomach-churning to some people, in some cultures the practice of eating horse meat is not just acceptable, it's a treat. NPR's Peter Kenyon just returned from the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan and checked out the meat market at the Green Bazaar in Almaty.

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Politics
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Interior Secretary's Confirmation Hits Snags Over Proposed Road In Alaska

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Sally Jewell was tapped last month for Interior Secretary but one of Alaska's senators, Republican Lisa Murkowski, announced she might block the nomination. At issue is a proposed gravel road in King Cove, Alaska. The town is so remote that the residents have no way to get in and out. The road would connect King Cove to a larger town nearby, but it would have to cut through a national wildlife refuge. Washington Post environment reporter Juliet Eilperin explains to Audie Cornish why the town of less than a thousand has an impact on a nomination for a national position

Medical Treatments
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Mississippi Toddler Could Be First Child Cured Of HIV

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

A child born with HIV has been cured of the virus, researchers say. Audie Cornish talks to Richard Knox about what was different about this child among the millions who've been treated in the past and what it means for the prospect of an HIV cure in adults.

Animals
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Kentucky City Fights Migratory Bird Invasion With Air Cannons, Lasers

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Audie Cornish talks with Geoff LaBaron, an ornithologist with National Audubon Society, about a strange blackbird invasion in the town of Hopkinsville, Ky.

Energy
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Proposal To Reverse Flow Of Oil Pipeline Stirs Controversy In New England

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:37 pm

As environmentalists protest a western pipeline, northern New England towns also worry that a pipeline that crosses the region will soon carry tar sands oil from western Canada. Their concerns were heightened recently when the CEO of a local pipeline company told Vermont lawmakers he's looking for new business — including shipping the controversial heavy crude. Two dozen Vermont towns will consider the issue at their annual meetings this month.

Technology
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Tech Week Ahead: SXSW Interactive

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Audie Cornish talks with Laura Sydell for a preview of South by Southwest Interactive. The tech event, one of the most popular showcases for tech startups and emerging technologies, starts later this week in Austin.

All Tech Considered
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too

An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:05 pm

Allegations that the Chinese military has been hacking U.S. corporations are raising tensions. But in the case of a full-fledged cyberwar, things would look very different.

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Remembrances
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Three Motown Artists Die Within Weeks Of Each Other

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Audie Cornish has more on three Motown artists who died recently — Bobby Rogers, a founding member of the hit-making Motown group the Miracles; Richard Street, a member of the Temptations; and Damon Harris, who sang with the Temptations on many of their hits.

The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Listing The World's Billionaires: A Not-So-Exact Science

Two recent tallies of the world's richest people agree on the broad points — but not on which continent has the most billionaires. Here, U.S. dollars are counted, with Chinese yuan notes in the background.
STR AFP/Getty Images

There are more than 1,400 billionaires in the world right now, according to two sources — one in the U.S., and one in China. But the tallies by Forbes and Hurun Report differ on key points, including whether there are now more billionaires in Asia than anywhere else.

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Historic Election Day In Kenya Is Marred By The Killing Of 19

Voters line up in Kibera to vote. Long lines stretched over a mile long in some parts of Nairobi.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:16 pm

The historic presidential election in Kenya turned violent in two polling stations near the border with Somalia on Monday.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports from Nairobi that the attack marred what had been an otherwise peaceful day. He filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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