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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Book News: Newly Found Oscar Wilde Letter: 'Sacrifice For Your Art'

Playwright Oscar Wilde poses in an 1882 photo.
New York Public Library, Sarony ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 9:05 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Three Marines Killed In Shooting At Base In Virginia

The entrance to the U.S. Marine Corps Base Quantico on Friday.
Matthew Barakat AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 8:35 am

A Marine opened fire at a Virginia base Thursday night, killing two other Marines before turning the gun on himself.

Quoting Marine Base Quantico spokesman Lt. Agustin Solivan, the AP reports the shootings happened after 11 p.m. near the Officer Candidate School. The AP adds:

"Authorities entered the barracks early Friday and found the suspect dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound along with a second victim. Solivan could not say what prompted authorities to enter the barracks, which are at the base's officer candidate school.

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Around the Nation
6:51 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Petition Calls On Congress To Dress Like NASCAR Drivers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:44 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Town Board In N.Y. Revises Booing Ban

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Lawmakers in Riverhead, New York heard the voice of the people, a very loud boo. The town board made news by banning people from booing at meetings, which apparently met with criticism since Newsday reports they have revised the rule. You may boo at meetings now, but there is still a prohibition against disruptive behavior. So, how to boo without being disruptive? Maybe this way: Wait your turn to speak and then say: My name is Steve. Boo?

Around the Nation
4:53 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Kids' Voices Key On Both Sides Of Gay-Marriage Debate

The Rev. Gene Robinson, along with his daughter Ella and partner Mark Andrew, attend a news conference after Robinson was confirmed as bishop of the Episcopal Church in Minneapolis in 2003. Robinson was the church's first openly gay bishop, and his daughter is an advocate for gay marriage.
Eric Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 3:21 pm

When the Supreme Court takes up same-sex marriage next week, much of the debate will revolve around children. Opponents have long argued that kids' best interests require both a mom and a dad. Recently, however, more children of same-sex couples have started speaking out for themselves.

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Business
4:49 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Census Bureau: Americans Burdened By High Debt

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with high debt and low wealth.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Since the financial crisis, many Americans have been saving money and paying down debt. Many are in better financial shape than a few years ago. But when you look at the longer term, it is clear that Americans as a whole have not regained all the ground they lost.

The Census Bureau compared Americans in 2011 with their wealth and debt burdens in that seemingly long-ago year, 2000.

NPR's John Ydstie reports.

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Politics
4:43 am
Fri March 22, 2013

GOP Encouraged To Shift Immigration, Gay Marriage Positions

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

With his journey, the president temporarily left behind a changing American political scene. The Republican Party is struggling with that change. Public opinion on immigration and gay marriage is changing quickly. That forces Republicans to try a balancing act, as NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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Middle East
4:40 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Obama Asks Young Israelis To Push For Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:24 am

President Obama is urging both Israelis and Palestinians not to abandon long-stalled peace talks. The president has been practicing some low-key shuttle diplomacy this week.

Sports
4:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Harvard Thrills Day 1 NCAA Tournament Watchers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Whoever first said history repeats itself probably never expected Harvard to win a game in the NCAA men's basketball tournament. It's never happened before. The Ivy League school was a number 14 seed, which is about as low as you'd expect, and the Crimson stunned number three seed, New Mexico, 68-62 - nor was it the only upset yesterday. Let's hear about some of the other games, starting with NPR's Tom Goldman in San Jose, California.

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Sports
4:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

March Madness Report From Lexington, Kentucky

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: And I'm Mike Pesca in Lexington, Kentucky where Marquette, Louisville, Butler and Colorado State all advanced. That was the big story for sure, but there was something else that had all the players talking. Other than the memories of a lifetime and the chance to keep living their dreams and all that, there was - as Jamil Wilson pointed out to this Marquette teammate Vander Blue - this amazing room they just walked by in the hallway.

JAMIL WILSON: It was, like, nuts. And me and Vander were, like, yo, we gotta see the locker room.

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Around the Nation
4:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

What Does It Mean To Be A Woman In The U.S. Military?

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We've been hearing some really astonishing voices this week that have prompted a big reaction online - women who have served on the battlefield and on bases here at home. Women are no longer excluded from combat but their exact role is still to be fully decided.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Education
4:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Chicago Teachers, Parents Riled By Plan To Close 54 Public Schools

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis speaks outside Mahalia Jackson Elementary School in Chicago about the planned closing of 54 public schools. Opponents say the plan will disproportionately affect minority students in the nation's third-largest school district.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 12:43 am

In Chicago, officials have released a long-feared list that places more than 50 schools on the chopping block. The public school district faces a $1 billion shortfall, and the mayor says many of the city's school buildings are half empty. Some angry parents and teachers say the plan will harm children and they'll fight to keep the schools open.

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Iraq
4:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

'Tiny Fraction' Took Advantage During Iraq's Reconstruction

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All this week on MORNING EDITION, we've been marking the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. That invasion was followed by years of war and reconstruction, the war and reconstruction taking place at the same time.

And today, to get a better idea of the monetary costs, we speak with Stuart Bowen once again. Since 2004, he has been the Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. And earlier this month, he released the final report from his office.

Stuart Bowen is in Baghdad. Welcome back to the program.

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Research News
3:02 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd

Fans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012.
Roger Kisby Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

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Movies
3:01 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Not Doing So 'Boffo,' 'Daily Variety' Drops Print Edition

Print versions of Daily Variety, like this one from 2003, will no longer be available on L.A. newsstands. Variety will continue online and in a print weekly, but the daily print edition is being dropped.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

For eight decades, Daily Variety has been a Hollywood must-read for everyone from studio heads to actors looking for a big break. But the days of assistants running out to grab the "trades" are over: This week, the Los Angeles institution published its last daily edition.

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