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4:32 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

French Twitter Lawsuit Pits Free Speech Against Hate Speech

A wave of racist tweets prompted a Jewish student organization to file a lawsuit asking the American company Twitter to reveal the identities of users sending anti-Semitic tweets. Twitter says data on users is collected and stocked in California, where French law cannot be applied.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:48 pm

A French judge will decide this week if Twitter must hand over the identities of users sending anti-Semitic tweets. The case, brought against Twitter by a Jewish student organization, pits America's free speech guarantees against Europe's laws banning hate speech.

The controversy began in October, when the French Union of Jewish Students threatened to sue Twitter to get the names of people posting anti-Semitic tweets with the hashtag #unbonjuif, or "a good Jew."

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:30 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Toward A New View of Law and Society: Complexity And Power In The Legal System

The United States Supreme Court: a temple to complexity and self-reinforcing feedback loops?
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Contrary to its aim of promoting justice and equality before the law, in practice the American legal system increasingly favors moneyed and politically influential groups. The capture of Congress by campaign donors and lobbyists, accelerated by the Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United, is one prominent example, but this power dynamic is ubiquitous in political and legal institutions. This favoritism for the powerful can be best understood as deeply intertwined with, and even an inevitable result of, increasing complexity in legal institutions.

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Shots - Health News
4:16 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Growing Pains As Doctors' Offices Adopt Electronic Records

Patient William Wishart, age 4 months, looks on as Dr. Melanie Walker uses a portable computer to enter information from his exam into an electronic medical records system, in North Raleigh, N.C., in November.
Chris Seward MCT /Landov

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:48 pm

Information technology has transformed much of the American economy, but its use in health care still lags, especially when it comes to electronic medical records.

Here's an example: The state of Colorado runs a computerized registry where any provider who gives a child a vaccine can report that information. The system should help kids stay current with their immunizations.

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Movies
3:56 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Sundance Subsidy Stirs Conservative Pushback

Robert Redford's annual Sundance Film Festival draws thousands of filmgoers and millions of dollars to snowy Park City, Utah. But a state subsidy contributing to the event is drawing controversy from some conservatives, who say films screened at the festival don't reflect the values of the state.
Jemal Countess Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:48 pm

A disagreement between supporters of the Sundance Film Festival and a conservative think tank in Utah is raising questions about whether tax dollars should support the arts. The Sutherland Institute says some films screened at Sundance do not reflect Utah values.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

French Soldier's Skeleton Scarf Goes Viral, Military Launches Investigation

This isn't the sort of picture of a French soldier that his commanders want to see. Photographer Issouf Sanogo says troops were protecting their faces from dust kicked up by a helicopter landing in central Mali on Sunday.
Issouf Sanogo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 6:54 pm

The photo is quite striking, to be sure.

Agence France Press photographer Issouf Sanogo writes that when he was with French soldiers in central Mali on Sunday, "a helicopter was coming in to land and churning up tremendous dust clouds. Instinctively, all the soldiers grabbed their scarfs to avoid getting a mouthful of sand."

Sanogo started taking pictures.

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Music Interviews
3:32 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Jose James: A Broad-Minded Singer Lets The Beat Build

Jose James' new studio album is titled No Beginning No End.
Janette Beckman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 8:48 pm

Jose James knows jazz. The son of a Panamanian jazz saxophonist, he studied at the prestigious New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York City, was a finalist in 2004's Thelonious Monk International Jazz Vocalist Competition and recently toured with legendary jazz pianist McCoy Tyner.

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World Cafe
3:17 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Kopecky Family Band On World Cafe

Kopecky Family Band.
Courtesy of the artist

Although the six members of the Kopecky Family Band aren't related by blood, they function with a sense of harmony common in family outfits. Formed in 2007, the group released a series of EPs before finally releasing its first full-length album, Kids Raising Kids, in 2012.

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Beyonce's National Anthem Was Pre-Recorded, Marine Band Says

Pat Benic DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:02 pm

Update at 6:14 p.m. ET. Backing Off?

Capt. Eric Flanagan, a spokesman for the United States Marine Corps, sent us a statement that seems to back off a bit from their earlier statements saying Beyoncé lip-synced her way through the National Anthem during President Obama's inauguration, yesterday.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Reports: Shots Fired At Houston Community College

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 5:30 pm

Update at 5:19 p.m. ET. College Safe:

During a news briefing, Sheriff Maj. Armando Tello said that the Lone Star College campus is now safe.

Tello said three people were injured, after an altercation between two men led to a shooting. One of the individuals invovled in the altercation was a student at the college. Another one of those shot was a maintance worker caught in the cross fire.

Tello did not give any details as to the condition of the injured.

Classes will resume tomorrow.

Our Original Post Continues:

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Shots - Health News
2:39 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Doctors Are Diagnosing More Kids With ADHD

The increase in diagnoses could be due to better education of parents, and better access to health care, the researchers say.
iStockphoto.com

For at least a decade, many have assumed that too many fidgety kids have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and been medicated for it. But it's still been hard to get reliable information on just how many kids are getting diagnosed and whether it's justified. So researchers at Kaiser Permanente in California decided to look at the trend, using the best data they could get from kids who'd actually seen specialists.

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The Salt
2:36 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

The Inaugural Food Scene In 12 Bites

The restaurant Equinox served a Sunday brunch on Jan. 20 featuring courses inspired by President Obama and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s favorite foods, including this salad of citrus cured arctic char with watermelon radish, mache leaves and lobster vinaigrette.
Daniel M.N. Turner Daniel M.N. Turner / NPR

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 9:32 am

Uptown and downtown in D.C. this weekend, some 600,000 people or so celebrated President Obama's second inauguration. And they were hungry.

Reflecting the president's message of diversity, city chefs and caterers turned out everything from highbrow brunches featuring smoked salmon and eggs Benedict to a luau, complete with leis and a spit-roasted pig. And there were plenty of hot dogs and chicken and waffles to be found between the balls.

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Around the Nation
2:27 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

'68 Blocks': One Neighborhood's Struggle With Violence

Best friends Kaori Tate and Ghiyahna Ennis explore their plot in the community garden.
Suzanne Kreiter The Boston Globe

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 1:50 pm

Bowdoin-Geneva is a Massachusetts neighborhood infamous for its violence. The 68-block section of Dorchester, Boston's largest neighborhood, has been consistently more dangerous than Boston as a whole over the past 25 years.

A team of reporters from the Boston Globe spent almost a year seeking to understand the perpetual cycles of violence and why efforts to turn the tide repeatedly fail.

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Around the Nation
1:58 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Remembering Seneca Falls, Selma And Stonewall

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 2:23 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

In his second inaugural address yesterday, President Obama emphasized equality and the struggles for civil rights.

(SOUNDBITE OF INAUGURAL ADDRESS)

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Science
1:58 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Explorers Reflect On 125 Years Of National Geographic

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 2:18 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Back in 1999, I went along with Robert Ballard on a radio expedition to the Black Sea, where he hoped to find evidence that what's now a vast inland ocean was once a small freshwater lake. A controversial theory holds that thousands of years ago, the waters of the Mediterranean Sea suddenly burst through in a flood that may have inspired the story of Noah.

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World
1:58 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Al-Qaida's Next Stronghold? What's At Stake In North Africa

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the weekend, Algerian troops stormed a gas facility in a remote area near the country's eastern border and ended a four-day standoff with Islamic militants who seized the production complex and dozens of hostages.

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