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The Record
4:44 am
Tue January 22, 2013

'The Chronic' 20 Years Later: An Audio Document Of The L.A. Riots

Dr. Dre (right) with Snoop Dogg, who played a starring role on Dre's The Chronic. Here they pose after a 1993 performance in Chicago.
Raymond Boyd Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:25 pm

Advisory: The videos on this page contain profanity.

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NPR Story
4:44 am
Tue January 22, 2013

Heavy Rotation At KMHD: PROJECT Trio's 'Sweet Pea'

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 6:28 am

Morning Edition introduces listeners to another installment in the NPR series "Heavy Rotation," featuring Matt Fleeger of member station KMHD. In "Sweet Pea," by PROJECT Trio, listeners are treated to a sort of rhythmic, jazzy groove that incorporates themes from classical, hip-hop and Americana.

NPR Story
4:44 am
Tue January 22, 2013

Civil Rights Highlighted On Inauguration Day

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 10:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Four years ago, President Obama delivered an inaugural speech that many viewed as somber. He took office facing two wars and a global economic crisis.

INSKEEP: Yesterday, the president declared a decade of war is now ending. And he took a position in the economic battles that remain.

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All Tech Considered
3:41 am
Tue January 22, 2013

This Defense Contractor Has A Green Side

AeroVironment's Raven drone is used for military surveillance and can be launched by hand.
Courtesy of AeroVironment Inc.

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 10:06 am

Lots of companies make products that don't have much in common, but AeroVironment specializes in two products that are very different — electric vehicle chargers, which keep cars like the Nissan Leaf on the road, and military drones. The Los Angeles-area firm is a leading manufacturer of small unmanned aircraft.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
3:39 am
Tue January 22, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: Hidden Lives

Longtime CIA agent and counterintelligence agent Jeanne Vertefeuille, pictured at center, was instrumental in uncovering undercover agents, or moles, within the organization in the 1980s and '90s.
Central Intelligence Agency

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 10:06 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of Newsweek and The Daily Beast, occasionally joins Morning Edition to talk about what she's been reading for a feature we call "Word of Mouth." This month, she recommends a trio of stories on people who've led hidden and often extraordinary lives — a businesswoman and technological giant who started life in Chinese re-education camps, a billionaire investor and education reformer whose personal experiences are too big for a series of ghostwriters, and a CIA agent whose job was to find a story among piles of forgotten documents.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 am
Tue January 22, 2013

'Roe V. Wade' Turns 40, But Abortion Debate Is Even Older

While the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision of Jan. 22, 1973, is usually considered the start of the abortion debate, the move to relax state abortion laws began with medical and law professionals in the 1960s. Here, Eunice Kennedy Shriver and doctors from Johns Hopkins University and the Harvard Divinity School announce the International Conference on Abortion on Aug. 9, 1967.
Bob Daugherty AP

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 3:57 pm

Jan. 22, 2013, marks the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

But the conventional wisdom that the court's 7-2 decision marked the beginning of a contentious battle that still rages today is not the case, according to those on both sides of the dispute.

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Around the Nation
7:19 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Inaugural Balls Downsized The Second Time Around

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

So 9-year-old Lauren Kanabel there has a dream: a girl president elected in 2016. And whether or not that dream comes true, there will be inaugural balls. The tradition dates back to George Washington. Four years ago, President Obama attended ten inaugural balls, this year only two, both at the convention center here in Washington. And NPR's Allison Aubrey is there. She joins us by phone. Allison, the ball has been going on for a few hours now. What's the scene?

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The Two-Way
6:21 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

When It Comes To Inaugural Fashion, First Family Stays The Course

First lady Michelle Obama arrives at the Senate carriage entrance for the presidential inauguration ceremonies at the U.S Capitol.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 22, 2013 1:24 pm

Update at 9:05 p.m. ET Michelle Obama's Dress

NBC News is reporting that the first lady is wearing a custom Jason Wu ruby-colored chiffon and velvet gown, Jimmy Choo shoes and a ring by Kimberly McDonald to the Commander in Chief Ball. The White House said that the outfit and accompanying accessories will go to the National Archives at the end of the inaugural events.

Our original post:

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Around the Nation
5:26 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Senators' Tussle Over Pens Breaks Inauguration's Decorum

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block have more on the small tussle over a pen after Monday's inauguration ceremonies.

Around the Nation
5:23 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Inaugural Luncheon A Bipartisan Mixer Packed With Formality, Tradition

President Obama dined with lawmakers at the Capitol in the traditional inaugural luncheon on Monday. Within hours, Obama and congressional Republicans will be back at it over the debt ceiling, spending cuts and a possible government shutdown.

Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Obama's Second Inauguration Marked By A Different Feeling

Melissa Block talks to some people on the National Mall about their reaction to President Obama's inaugural address.

Around the Nation
5:21 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Lincoln Memorial A Doubly Powerful Place On Inauguration Day

For many inauguration attendees without tickets to official viewing areas, there was a historic alternative all the way on the other side of the National Mall at the Lincoln Memorial. Lincoln is often invoked by President Obama and the memorial's role in the civil rights movement also made it a powerful draw on a day that was not only Inauguration Day, but also Martin Luther King, Jr., Day.

Around the Nation
5:20 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

How Large Does President Obama Stand In Black History?

Robert Siegel talks to several prominent African-Americans for their thoughts on what it has meant to have the first black president. We hear from Roger Wilkins, a civil rights activist, history professor, and journalist; Washington, D.C., Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton; writer Shelby Steele of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University; and civil rights lawyer Sherrilyn Ifill, the new head of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Governing
5:19 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

Obama's Speech Acts Like Preamble To State Of The Union Address

Robert Siegel talks to national political correspondent Mara Liasson for analysis of the president's speech on Inauguration Day.

Around the Nation
5:13 pm
Mon January 21, 2013

In Kentucky's Coal Country, A Resentment For Obama

The Big Sandy Power Plant, 4 miles north of Louisa, is the biggest industry in Lawrence County. Local residents blame President Obama's environmental policies for the company's plans to close the plant in 2015.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Mon January 21, 2013 8:22 pm

If the voters in Louisa, Ky., had their wish, Mitt Romney would have taken the oath of office Monday. Louisa is in eastern Kentucky, and "coal" was the one-word issue in the election. President Obama is seen as an enemy of coal mining and he got only 27 percent of the vote in the county.

And now comes word that Louisa is going to lose its biggest industry — a power generating plant that's been burning coal since 1962.

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