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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Olympic Cyclist Dies After Being Hit By Taxi In South Africa

South African cyclist Burry Stander, seen here riding in the cross-country mountain bike race at the London Olympics, was killed during a training ride Thursday in South Africa.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Burry Stander, one of the world's elite mountain bikers, was killed Thursday as he rode his bike in his native South Africa. Stander, 25, a two-time Olympian who placed fifth in his event at the London 2012 Olympics, was reportedly struck by a taxi van as he trained near his home in Shelley Beach, on South Africa's southeastern coast.

The close proximity of the accident to his childhood home apparently allowed Stander's family members, reportedly including his wife, mother and father, to arrive at the scene quickly.

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The Picture Show
12:05 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

'Why We Are Here': Capturing The Spirit Of Mobile, Ala.

Roy Hyde, Fairhope.
Courtesy of Alex Harris

In 1991, photographer Alex Harris was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction for his book River of Traps, written with William deBuys. It told the story, in words and pictures, of an old-time New Mexican villager. Harris didn't win.

Instead, the prize went to evolutionary biologist E.O. Wilson for The Ants.

"It took me 20 years to get over that defeat," said Harris.

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Book Reviews
12:04 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

'A Grain Of Truth' About Memory And Modern Poland

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:26 pm

My mother is Polish, which meant that during the holidays when I was a kid, we broke out the polka records and kielbasa for special occasion meals from Thanksgiving to New Year's Day. Certainly, nostalgia for those belch-y festivities of yore led me to A Grain of Truth by Zygmunt Miloszewski, a Polish mystery novel that unexpectedly turns out to be as hard-boiled as the skin around a circlet of that ubiquitous holiday kielbasa.

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Fri January 4, 2013

In Australia, Trees Made Famous By Aboriginal Artist Fall To Suspected Arsonist

One of the "ghost gums," which fell to the ground after being set afire.
Northern Territory Govt., Dept. of Attorney General & Justice

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 1:47 pm

Two "ghost gum" trees that were revered by many in Australia after being made famous by Aboriginal artist Albert Namatjira have been found toppled over and burned — victims of a suspected arsonist.

The trees, in the outback near Alice Springs, were due to soon be put on Australia's national heritage register, The Guardian says. It adds that:

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The Salt
11:50 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Don't Waste That Christmas Tree: Turn It Into Spruce Beer

You can keep the Christmas smell going all year long. Or, at least until you finish your spruce beer.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:40 pm

The holidays are finally wrapping up. So after you repack the twinkly lights, and the tinsel goes into the trash, what should you do with that once beautiful spruce standing in your living room? Why not drink it?

Well, not exactly as is. The needles, shoots, light-green tips and inner bark of the popular conifer have been used for centuries to brew forest-scented tea, soft drinks and beer. And it seems that fresh evergreen flavor may be making a comeback.

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Economy
11:39 am
Fri January 4, 2013

After Outsourcing Boom, An 'Insourcing' Comeback?

Following years of moving jobs overseas, some companies are deciding there are benefits to manufacturing products here at home. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the latest jobs numbers and the new trend called "insourcing." Headlee talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Sudeep Reddy and journalist Charles Fishman.

Faith Matters
11:39 am
Fri January 4, 2013

For Many Orthodox, Christmas Is Just Beginning

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee, in for Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up: We asked you to tweet your ideas on how to bring peace into your life in 2013. We'll hear some of those responses in just a few minutes.

But, first, it's time for Faith Matters. That's the part of the program when we talk about issues of faith, religion and spirituality. Today, we want to talk about Christmas. That's right, Christmas.

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Remembrances
11:38 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Remembering 'Rescue Me' Singer Fontella Bass

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:04 pm

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Soul and gospel singer Fontella Bass, whose 1965 hit "Rescue Me" endures as one of the most recognizable soul records of the '60s, died last week on the day after Christmas. She was 72 years old. Despite the success of "Rescue Me," it was the number one R&B single for four weeks, it took years of litigation before Bass could claim her share of songwriting credit and royalties. In 1993, she sued American Express for using the song in a commercial and received what she said was a significant settlement.

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Author Interviews
11:33 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Frank Calabrese Jr. On Opening His 'Family Secrets'

Defendants in the "Operation Family Secrets" trial included Frank Calabrese Sr. (clockwise from left), Joey Lombardo, Anthony Doyle, Paul Shiro and James Marcello. The men are pictured during an Aug. 15, 2007, court hearing in Chicago.
Verna Sadock AP

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:04 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on March 14, 2011. Frank Calabrese's father, the Chicago mobster Frank Calabrese Sr., died on Christmas Day.

When Frank Calabrese Jr. was a teenager, his father came home one night and took him into the bathroom for a chat.

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Update: Senate Joins House In Passing Sandy Aid Bill

Superstorm Sandy swept through the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., in late October. In late November, this sign symbolized the hope of homeowners that help would be coming soon.
Eric Thayer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 2:27 pm

Update at 2:17 p.m. ET. Passage In The Senate:

The Senate just passed, by unanimous agreement, a bill that injects more than $9 billion into the insurance program that will assist those hit hard by Superstorm Sandy last October.

President Obama had urged passage and is expected to quickly sign the bill.

Our original post:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:06 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Manhattan, Re-imagined For A Climate Changed Era.

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 2:07 pm

Dealing will climate change will demand our best creative capacities. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy the vulnerabilities of New York City have become all to apparent. Clearly a response is required.

A recent post on Atlantic Cities by Roy Strickland gives a great example of what such creative responses to a changing planet on the local level can look like. As he describes it:

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The Salt
11:02 am
Fri January 4, 2013

FDA Releases Rules To Strengthen Safety Of Food Supply

Farmworkers like these in California picking produce may soon be required by the FDA to take more precautions against spreading foodborne illness.
Heather Craig iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 3:10 pm

UPDATED: 4:50 p.m. Looking for a little weekend reading? The Food and Drug Administration has just the thing. On Friday, the agency released two proposed rules designed to boost the safety of the nation's food supply, encompassing hundreds of pages.

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Gerda Lerner Dies, Women's Studies Trailblazer

Professor Gerda Lerner, in a handout from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconson, Madison

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 12:00 pm

Historian Gerda Lerner, a pioneer in the creation of women's studies as an academic discipline, has died in Madison, Wisc. She was 92.

A prolific feminist author, Lerner wrote texts that traced the history of patriarchy going back thousands of years to more modern topics, such as African American women's history. Her many books included a two volume work called 'Women in History': the first book examined the history of patriarchy and the second dealt with the start of feminist consciousness.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Science Looked Good In 2012

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

And now joining us is Flora Lichtman. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Multimedia editor with our Video Pick of the Week, and it's topical, of course.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Cold-Water Fish Break The Ice With Antifreeze

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 1:33 pm

Cold-water fish, snow-dwelling bugs and some grasses have evolved natural antifreeze proteins to avoid turning to ice cubes. Peter Davies, a biologist at Queen's University in Ontario, discusses how these antifreeze substances work, and their applications for human problems--like keeping the ice out of ice cream.

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