NPR News

Pages

History
12:30 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Buying Freedom Through Dressmaking

The new movie 'Lincoln' explores the last months of Abraham Lincoln's life and sheds light on prominent figures of the time. One lesser-known person is former slave Elizabeth Keckley. She became a close confidante to Mary Todd Lincoln. Host Michel Martin speaks with professor Clarence Lusane about Keckley's contributions to American history.

Economy
12:30 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

How Helpful Is Extending Unemployment Benefits?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, for years now we've been talking about ways to close the achievement gap. Now some states are asking to set standards based on race. You can imagine why this is controversial. So we'll try to learn more about this in just a few minutes.

Read more
Monkey See
12:22 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

The Spatter Pattern: Does All The Good Television Have To Be So Bloody?

Aaron Paul plays Jesse Pinkman on AMC's Breaking Bad.
Ursula Coyote AMC

[This piece contains information about the plots of lots of contemporary TV dramas, probably most notably a context-free discussion of an incident during the most recent season of Breaking Bad, as well as general comments on the plot of the film The Grey.]

Read more
The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

VIDEO: Missouri Bridge Blows Up Real Good (On Purpose)

Boom! The westbound side of Missouri's Blanchette Bridge went down Tuesday.
Missouri Department of Transportation

We're little kids when it comes to watching things blow up.

So we're happy to pass along video of the westbound sections of the Blanchette Bridge that connects St. Louis and St. Charles, Mo., going boom Tuesday.

Read more
Music
12:04 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Make Your Mark On Austin's Music Map

The Austin Music Map celebrates the city's annual Juneteenth Parade.
Courtesy of Delaney Hall

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 12:33 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Legendary Jazz Musician Dave Brubeck Dies

Dave Brubeck performs along with his Dave Brubeck Quartet in November 2005.
Timm Schamberger AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 11:36 am

Dave Brubeck, the legendary jazz pianist and composer, known for defying jazz conventions and for recordings like "Take Five" and "Blue Rondo a la Turk," has died.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:38 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Recreating The Universe In The Lab

One way we make sense of the cosmos is to study what's in it, objects like this brown dwarf (artist's impression) observed by the ESO's ALMA project. Another way is to watch what happens when tiny particles are smashed together in "labs" such as the LHC at CERN.
M. Kornmesser ALMA/ESO/NAOJ/NRAO

The study of cosmology, the branch of the physical sciences that investigates the universe and its properties, presents quite a practical challenge: contrary to most other sciences, where different samples can be probed and analyzed directly, it's impossible to experiment with different universes in the lab.

Read more
The Salt
11:19 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Why Drinking Tea Was Once Considered A Dangerous Habit

Tea a dangerous habit? Women have long made a ritual of it, but in 19th century Ireland, moral reformers tried to talk them out of it. At the time, tea was considered a luxury, and taking the time to drink it was an affront to the morals of frugality and restraint.
iStockphoto.com

Given tea's rap today as both a popular pick-me-up and a health elixir, it's hard to imagine that sipping tea was once thought of as a reckless, suspicious act, linked to revolutionary feminism.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:11 am
Wed December 5, 2012

China's Communists Declare War ... On Boring Meetings

Must ... stay .... awake: A Chinese paramilitary police officer yawns and his colleagues fall asleep while then-President Hu Jintao delivers a speech at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Dec. 18, 2008.
Andy Wong AP

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 9:14 pm

Suffer from insomnia? The droning rhythm of a Chinese Communist official reading a work report out loud will likely do the trick.

It certainly does for many party members: Just 10 minutes into any party meeting, look down the serried ranks of the attendees, and you'll spot the dozers and snoozers, napping away, heads lolling lazily toward their neighbors.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:09 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Citigroup Cutting 11,000 Jobs, Taking $1.1 Billion In Charges

Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 2:48 pm

Saying it needs to "further reduce expenses and improve efficiency across the company," Citigroup announced today that it is eliminating about 11,000 jobs — 4 percent of its global workforce.

The banking giant also said it is expects to take "pre-tax charges of approximately $1 billion in the fourth quarter of 2012 and approximately $100 million of related charges in the first half of 2013."

Read more
Monkey See
10:42 am
Wed December 5, 2012

40 Years After 'Free To Be,' A New Album Says 'It's Okay To Do Stuff'

Rooftop Comedy Productions

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 10:29 am

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
10:26 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Strange Looking Tombstone Tells Of Moving Ice, Ancient Climates And A Restless Mind

Encyclopaedia Britannica UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 12:39 pm

With glaciers melting and crumbling all over the world, let me tell you the story of the man who first imagined ice ages, the man buried under this stone in Cambridge, Mass. It's an odd gravestone; a rough, clumpy hunk of granite that doesn't look at all like the other markers at Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

That's because it isn't. It's an erratic. A single stone found sitting downhill from a glacier in Switzerland that was lifted, packed, shipped to all the way to Massachusetts to honor this man.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:25 am
Wed December 5, 2012

'NY Post' Photographer: I Was Too Far Away To Reach Man Hit By Train

Before the attack: Two men are seen talking on a New York City subway platform Monday in this framegrab from a video released by the New York City Police Department. Moments later, police say, Ki-Suk Han (whose face is obscured) was pushed on to the tracks.
New York City Police Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu December 13, 2012 3:26 pm

It's a horrifying image that has sparked a passionate debate.

By now you've probably heard about the front page photo on Tuesday's New York Post of a man struggling to climb out of an approaching subway train's way. He had been pushed on to the tracks by a stranger.

Ki-Suck Han, 58, did not make it. He died from the injuries he received.

Read more
The Picture Show
10:18 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Are You Done With That? Photographing The Results Of Your Good Will

Wesley Law poses atop one of the bales in the Goodwill Outlet store in St. Louis.
Courtesy of Wesley Law

Consider the stuff of our everyday lives — the clothes, the sheets, the toys and games. It's essential for a time, but inevitably, eventually, it all gets trashed — or donated.

And that donation process can seem a bit like magic. We drop off our used stuff, and the items disappear — or so we think.

But what truly becomes of it? Where does it go? And what does it look like?

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:51 am
Wed December 5, 2012

Medical Residents Work Long Hours Despite Rules

To reduce errors by doctors in training, medical educators have capped how long they can work. But enforcing the limits can be a challenge.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 10:05 am

More than 10 years after she was a internal medicine resident, Dr. Vineet Arora still thinks about how her shifts used to end.

She says the best shift change was one that didn't require her to transfer single patient to the next bunch of residents. "A good sign out was 'nothing to do,' " she recalls. "When I trained, you worked here until your work was done."

Read more

Pages