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Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Killing Off West Nile Virus: Bad For More Than Bugs?

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

As communities, such as Dallas, Texas, contemplate doing aerial spraying to control mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus, many people are expressing concerns about how the pesticides will affect their health, and the health of their environments. Melissa Blocks speaks to Dr. Robert Peterson, professor of Entomology at Montana State University.

Presidential Race
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Sound From The Trail: Ryan On His Running Mate

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

We're hearing from all the candidates on the presidential campaign trail this week. We listen to part of a stump speech from vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan in Glen Allen, Va.

Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Dallas Turns To Aerial Spraying To Control West Nile

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. Texas can't catch a break. First, a bitter drought, now officials in Dallas are fighting a nasty outbreak of West Nile virus. A quarter of the nation's current confirmed West Nile cases are in Dallas County. There, 10 people have died, and hundreds more have been sickened from mosquitoes carrying the virus.

For the first time in nearly half a century, much of the county has begun aerial spraying to control the pests. NPR's Wade Goodwyn has our story.

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Law
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

North Carolina Eugenics Victims Plan Next Steps

Rita Thompson Swords was sterilized by a doctor after delivering her second child. She was 21, unwed and poor, a combination that made her unfit for more children, according to the North Carolina Eugenics Board.
Julie Rose for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

North Carolina was poised to become the first state to compensate people who had been sterilized against their will under decades of eugenics laws. More than half of states had forced sterilization laws, but North Carolina's were particularly aggressive.

A bill to pay the victims nearly passed in recent months. But "nearly" isn't enough for the victims who risked their reputations to go public with their stories.

Now they — and their advocates — wonder what comes next.

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Afghanistan
4:12 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Afghan Attacks On Western Partners Rising Sharply

Afghan soldiers (right) patrol with U.S. troops in the Panjwai district of southern Afghanistan in May. The two armies have been working together for years, but Afghan attacks against U.S. and NATO forces have been rising recently.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

In the past two weeks, seven Afghans in uniform have opened fire on Western forces. The most recent incidents occurred Friday. First, a newly recruited policeman in western Afghanistan turned his gun on U.S. military trainers, killing two and wounding a third. A short time later in southern Kandahar province, an Afghan soldier shot and wounded two foreign troops.

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The Two-Way
3:31 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Snickers And 5-Star Hotels: Report Details Top General's Wasteful Spending

Army Lt. Gen. William E. Kip Ward is adminstered the oath of four-star General, the Army's highest rank of general.
Caleb Jones AP

A report made public today by the Department of Defense finally gives us details on what caused the downfall of Four-Star Gen. William "Kip" Ward.

More than a year ago, Ward gave up his post as leader of U.S. Africa Command and Stars and Stripes reported in May that he would be stripped of two of his stars, pending an investigation. But the reasons why were kept quiet, as Stars And Stripes reported.

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Music Reviews
3:17 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Fire Up Your Kid's Imagination At The 'Science Fair'

Science Fair includes science-loving songs from Laura Veirs, Mates of State, Elizabeth Mitchell and more.
El Lohse

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 6:03 pm

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
3:15 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

What Hepatitis C Tells Us About Drug Use And Addiction

Hepatitis C is commonly spread through the shared use of needles to inject drugs.
Alex iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 3:48 pm

U.S. health officials recommended this week that baby boomers — that is, anyone born between 1945 and 1965 — should get tested for hepatitis C. Why? New treatment options mean it will be possible to cure many more of the infected before they develop deadly diseases of the liver.

But there is an interesting story lurking beneath the headlines.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Study Supports Regulators' Effort To Limit Miners' Exposure To Coal Dust

A study released today by the Government Accountability Office says that the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) used appropriate data and scientific methods in drafting new regulations aimed at limiting the amount of coal dust miners are exposed to at U.S. operations.

As NPR's Howard Berkes reported for us last month, some House Republicans had blocked implementation of the regulations until GAO issued its report.

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It's All Politics
2:05 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Obama Camp's DOA Tax Offer To Romney Keeps Issue Alive

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 2:26 pm

The Friday offer from President Obama's campaign to Mitt Romney — that if the GOP presidential candidate releases his tax returns for the past five years, it won't attack him for not releasing more — was immediately rejected by the Romney campaign.

But the give-and-take keeps Romney on the defensive, and promises to keep the issue of Romney's taxes going for weeks to come.

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Space
2:01 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Massive "Phoenix Cluster" Supersizes Star Creation

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

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Book Reviews
1:55 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Actress Danica McKellar Helps "Girls Get Curves"

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

Up next, math books get a makeover. You may remember my next guest from her acting roles on "The Wonder Years." Winnie Cooper may ring a bell or "The West Wing." But for thousands of girls today, she's the writer and personality behind a bestselling series of books that aim to teach girls about math. First, there was "Math Doesn't Suck," then "Hot X: Algebra Revealed," and now we're onto geometry.

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Medical Treatments
1:44 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Working Towards A Universal Flu Vaccine

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow, who's out today. This week, the FDA approved a new influenza vaccine for this year's flu season, and soon enough summer will be over and you'll be standing in line again at your pharmacy or doctor's office, participating in that yearly ritual - your annual vaccination allocation.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Some Docs Doubt Blood Type, Heart Disease Link

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 1:22 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. Do you know your blood type? You may have wondered about it this week if you heard news linking blood type to your risk of heart disease. In that study, researchers determined that those with blood type O had the lowest risk of heart disease and those with AB the highest.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Fri August 17, 2012

Aging City Pipes In Need Of A Plumber's Touch

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 1:30 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. We're in the midst of the worst drought in over 50 years. Water tables are dropping faster than they can be replenished, and at the same time an op-ed in the New York Times today says that the United States is estimated to lose about one in six gallons, one in six gallons of clean water every day due to leaky pipes in the ground.

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