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Updated at 2:55 p.m. ET with additional reporting

The wonkiest soap opera in Washington served up yet more of its trademark plot twists on Tuesday as the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russia detoured even further into partisan bickering.

The upshot of the day's back-and-forth was this: Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a holdover from the previous administration whom President Trump fired on Jan. 31, is not barred by the White House from testifying in open hearings in Congress.

Celiac disease, the autoimmune disorder that prevents people from digesting gluten, affects about 1 percent of the population.

But there's not enough evidence to recommend screening everybody to find that 1 percent, an advisory panel said Tuesday.

When we think about dishonesty, we mostly think about the big stuff.

We see big scandals, big lies, and we think to ourselves, I could never do that. We think we're fundamentally different from Bernie Madoff or Tiger Woods.

But behind big lies are a series of small deceptions. Dan Ariely, a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, writes about this in his book The Honest Truth about Dishonesty.

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem.

For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal.

Calls are growing for the Republican chairman of a key intelligence panel to recuse himself.

"There is such a cloud over the chairman's leadership," Adam Schiff of California, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told NPR's Steve Inskeep on Morning Edition.

Schiff was referring to Chairman Devin Nunes, who revealed Monday that he had met with an intelligence official on the White House grounds a day before announcing that there was evidence he had seen to indicate the Trump campaign and transition were scooped up in incidental surveillance.

Exposure to lead as a child can affect an adult decades later, according to a study out Tuesday that suggests a link between early childhood lead exposure and a dip in a person's later cognitive ability and socioeconomic status.

Lead in the United States can come from lots of sources: old, peeling paint; contaminated soil; or water that's passed through lead pipes. Before policies were enacted to get rid of lead in gasoline, it could even come from particles in the fumes that leave car tailpipes.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Just hours after South Korean officials announced they had found human bones and possessions in the corroded wreck of the Sewol, those same officials withdrew the claim Tuesday.

What appeared to be the "bones of a dead person on the deck" of the long-sunken ferry are actually from "an animal" instead, authorities said in a statement. The BBC reports the country's National Forensic Service conducted tests on the bones and found them to be animal bone fragments.

Officials in New York, California and elsewhere say they'll fight Attorney General Jeff Sessions' move to cut off billions in federal grant money to cities that don't share the Trump administration's strict approach to enforcing immigration laws.

"The Trump Administration is pushing an unrealistic and mean spirited executive order," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted Monday night. "If they want a fight, we'll see them in court."

The great jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis once told an interviewer: "There's only freedom in structure, my man. There's no freedom in freedom."

In the past, entrepreneur Elon Musk has described a "neural lace" that could add a symbiotic digital layer to the human brain. In the future, it seems, he'll try to build that device through a new company, Neuralink.

On Saturday mornings, the most popular item Minto Island Growers sells at its farmers market booth is not the certified organic carrots, kale or blueberries. It's tea.

The farm grows Camellia sinensis, tea plants, on a half-acre plot in Salem, Ore. The tender leaves are hand picked and hand processed to make 100 pounds of organic, small batch tea.

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The Revolutionary War and Civil War are in the distant past, but their remnants continue to be problems today. In Charleston, S.C., cannonballs from those wars wash up on beaches or are found underground regularly.

And while some are benign pieces of history, others have the potential to explode and military bomb experts are called in to detonate them.

Detective Carl Makins, with the Charleston County bomb squad, says a lot of people don't understand how dangerous these cannonballs are.

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Good morning, I'm David Greene with some bizarre sports highlights.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ERIC ALVAREZ: Before you ask, yes, I did make this segment with things I found lying around my desk.

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At the very southernmost tip of Illinois, the pancake flat cornfields give way to the rolling, forested hills of the Delta.

Here, at the windy confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers, it feels more southern than Midwest when you arrive at the old river port and factory town of Cairo, once made famous in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

But Twain might not recognize Cairo today.

Opponents of President Trump say resistance to his policies is robust, motivated — and here to stay.

They point to big demonstrations including January's Women's March and the upcoming Earth Day "March for Science."

It's pretty quiet right now in Ogunquit, Maine. But Sarah Diment, owner of Beachmere Inn, says a surge of tourists in the summer will transform the city into a bustling New England ocean resort colony. And accompanying the tourists are an influx of foreign workers.

"Most of the women that have worked for us have come from Jamaica," Diment says. "They come, they work, they buy. It's an insane amount of goods that they ship home. And then they go home every year."

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Ahmed Kathrada spent decades in jail with Nelson Mandela, then spent the first years of democracy helping to shape the country's government after the fall of apartheid. Kathrada, 87, died in Johannesburg on Tuesday morning.

According to a statement posted by the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation, he "passed away peacefully after a short period of illness, following surgery to the brain."

Pick a street corner in downtown Hamtramck, Mich., and you'll be struck by the incredible mix of cultures crammed into this tiny, 2-square-mile city.

A Catholic church across the street from a mosque. Polish pastry shops, sausage factories, and grocery stores promising "the best Polish food, shipping to Eastern Europe," side by side with Bengali clothing shops that sell richly embroidered dresses and headscarves. And you'd be remiss if you didn't stop in the many Yemeni restaurants serving fragrant lamb and discs of flatbread the size of hubcaps.

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies.

The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change.

It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change.

In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency.

The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement.

Primate brains may have grown larger and more complex thanks to a fruit-filled diet, a new study suggests.

By an overwhelming 31-1 vote, NFL owners have approved the Raiders' move from Oakland to Las Vegas — though the team will still remain in the Bay Area for at least the 2017 season and possibly longer.

The number was nothing less than a shock to the system. In text set beside a series of photographs, each one depicting a girl of color staring back at the camera, the image that went viral on social media last week claims to lay bare an appalling truth: "14 Girls Have Gone Missing in DC in the Last 24 Hours."

Trouble is, police say the claim is not true.

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