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As the Obama presidency draws to a close, white and black Americans are deeply divided on views of race relations in the United States, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center.

The report, titled On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites are Worlds Apart, found that just 8 percent of black Americans say the changes needed to achieve racial equality for blacks in the U.S. have already been made, while nearly 40 percent of white Americans say the same thing.

Amid all the macro-level questions about the effects of Britain's decision to leave the European Union — its broad economic and political repercussions — the Brexit will be felt in small, practical, everyday terms as well. Although it's impossible to predict exactly how things will play out, here are a few of the possible ways Britons may experience repercussions of the Brexit:

Mobile phone usage

Between 2012 and 2014, the number of confirmed opiod-related overdose deaths in Massachusetts skyrocketed by 57%. Recently, the New Bedford City Council declared the opiod crisis a public health emergency. One addiction specialist in New Bedford says it’s time to consider the idea of a supervised injection facility for heroin addicts. A few other communities around the country also are exploring the idea, but overcoming the opposition – and the legal hurdles – could take years. 

A few dozen protesters gathered outside the Langham Hotel in downtown Boston Wednesday in advance of a fundraiser for presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump.

With shouts of "Dump Trump," and "Trump, You're Fired!"—as well as a somewhat unexpected verse or two of the Woody Guthrie anthem "This Land is Your Land," protesters chanted and waved signs for more than two hours outside the Post Office Square hotel, inside of which Trump was apparently wooing Bay State politicos to raise funds for his cash-strapped campaign.

Facebook says it's changing its news feed, again. It says posts from friends and family will now come first, prioritized over posts from publishers and celebrities.

It's potentially worrisome news for media companies, whose traffic is heavily boosted by Facebook-driven clicks. But it's also only a small, vague peek into the black box that is Facebook's algorithm, which determines what version of the world is presented to the 1.65 billion people using the social network.

Donald Trump roared into Bangor Wednesday afternoon into the collective embrace of about 5,000 loyal supporters at the Cross Center. The audience applauded the presumptive Republican nominee’s promises of great trade deals, expanded job opportunities and a no-exceptions immigration policy that he says will make America safe.

All of the campaign hoopla played well in the heart of Maine’s 2nd Congressional District, where large numbers of conservative voters could hand Trump one Electoral College vote if he carries the region in November.

A plan to improve management facets of the ocean and coasts of the northeastern U.S. states is headed for its final public hearings in Rhode Island and Maine.

Sherwood Taylor remembered the time he saw a friend die of an overdose, just feet away from where he sat on his bed in his Hartford apartment.

In an effort to secure land rights for its natural gas pipeline to Addison County, Vermont Gas Systems bought a property along the planned pipeline route for $1.75 million. According to land records, that's nearly twice the property's assessed value.

If the mythology of America's founding has a villain - it's the traitor Benedict Arnold. A once-heroic Revolutionary War general who betrayed his country and nearly lost the war for the colonies.

UVM Medical Center and other stakeholders recently released the 2016 Community Health Needs Assessment – a comprehensive, multi-year survey of community health challenges. The survey is a requirement of the Affordable Care Act.

The estimated cost of bringing clean water to all of the Bennington County properties contaminated with PFOA has risen to more than $30 million.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The three suicide bombers who carried out Tuesday's deadly attack on an international airport in Istanbul were Russian, Uzbek and Kyrgyz, a senior Turkish official says, according to a report by the Dogan News Agency.

The death toll in the triple suicide bombing and shooting attack has risen to at least 44, Turkish state-run media announced Thursday. More than 200 people were injured. The attack has not been claimed by any organization, but Turkish authorities say they suspect the Islamic State was behind it.

To Be The Very Best: Pokémon Enters Into Augmented Reality

Jun 30, 2016

Halfway through your walk to school, a wild Charmander appears. Just a few throws of a Pokéball, and it could be yours. Will you stop to catch it?

Nintendo is betting you will. Not just that, they're betting that you've waited most of your life to see a Pokémon in the real world.

Boris Johnson, who was widely considered a top candidate for U.K. prime minister once David Cameron steps down, has announced he will not be seeking the position.

The former mayor of London was a vocal proponent of the Brexit, and is a popular political figure — widely referred to as just "Boris."

He, like Cameron, is a member of the U.K.'s Conservative Party, which controls the British Parliament; the party's members will be choosing Cameron's replacement over the course of this summer.

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Two suicide bombers attacked a convoy of buses carrying Afghan police trainees, killing at least 30 people, according to reports from The Associated Press and Reuters.

The attack occurred about 12 miles west of Kabul, the AP says, citing the Paghman district governor, Mousa Rahmati. More than two dozen police trainees died, as well as four civilians, the AP says.

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the bombings.

The attack involved two explosions, Rahmati told the AP.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Donald Trump has staked his brand on winning. "We will have so much winning," he has said in this campaign, "if I get elected, that you may get bored with winning."

But can he win the presidential election? In a country that has changed rapidly demographically, Trump's best shot is to drive up turnout among white voters, especially white men. But how likely is that?

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After some 10,000 online tutorials in 10 years, Sal Khan still starts most days at his office desk in Silicon Valley, recording himself solving math problems for his Khan Academy YouTube channel.

"OK, let F of X equal A times X to the N plus," he says cheerfully as he begins his latest.

Khan Academy has helped millions of people around the world — perhaps hundreds of millions — learn math, science and other subjects for free.

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