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What's come to be called "the nation's T. rex" now stands — though not in the United States. It's in Canada.

The nearly complete and much heralded Tyrannosaurus skeleton — the first ever owned by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History — was discovered in 1988 by a Montana rancher, Kathy Wankel, and will eventually find a new home in a grand display in the Washington, D.C., museum.

The world's annual death toll from AIDS has been falling in recent years — 1.5 million in 2013, a 35 percent drop from the peak of 2.4 million in 2005.

Now the number of deaths could soon drop even more.

The World Health Organization issued new guidelines Wednesday that recommend greatly increasing the number of people who take antiretroviral medications for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Former CEO of Massey Energy Don Blankenship goes on trial Thursday in West Virginia over charges that he conspired to violate federal mine safety laws at company mines.

As West Virginia Public Broadcasting's Ashton Marra reports, the charges stem from a 2010 explosion at the Massey-owned Upper Big Branch mine that killed 29 men — the worst U.S. mining disaster in 40 years.

Today is the day — the beginning of the end for the venerable (but woefully open to abuse) magnetic stripe, a technology pioneered in the 1960s. Enter the more secure age of the chip, or "EMV" cards.

At least in theory.

It's actually a bit more complicated. Here are three things to know:

Is today (Oct. 1) the deadline for the switch from magnetic-stripe cards to the chipped cards?

If you're struck by a macaw, sucked into a jet engine or are having relationship problems with your in-laws, fear not: Your doctor now has a medical diagnosis code for that.

On Thursday, doctors, hospitals and health insurers must start using the ICD-10, a vast new set of alphanumeric codes for describing diseases and injuries in unprecedented detail.

The New York Police Department unveiled a new set of rules regarding its use of force, The New York Times, Newsday and the New York Post are reporting.

At the stroke of midnight, it became legal for Oregon dispensaries to sell marijuana to anyone over 21 years old. The state has also been allowing residents to wipe old pot charges from their criminal records.

Oregon becomes the third U.S. state to legalize recreational marijuana sales, joining Colorado and Washington.

From the Northwest News Network, Chris Lehman reports for our Newscast unit:

Russia says it has carried out at least 20 airstrikes in Syria. But many of those attacks hit areas miles from the ISIS strongholds that were initially named as targets. Syria's opposition says Russian forces are hitting any opponents of President Bashar Assad — and that civilians are paying a price.

"We want clear condemnation for the Russian brutality, and we want protection for the civilians," Khaled Khoja, leader of the anti-Assad Syrian National Council, said at a news conference in New York.

Updated, 1:20 a.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center's projections for Hurricane Joaquin in the past two days have incrementally moved the storm east. Now the government agency is saying the storm is likely to miss the United States altogether.

Some coastal flooding is still likely from the storm's surge, the hurricane center says, and unrelated rains could cause flooding in parts of the Carolinas and Virginia.

The official reporting deadline isn't until Oct. 15, but Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are already out with big numbers for the third quarter.

And those numbers tell us something about the state of the presidential race on the Democratic side.

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Three days after Taliban fighters swept into Kunduz, Afghanistan's government says its troops have retaken the strategically important northern city, but reports suggest the fighting is not yet over in the city.

Update at 1:15 p.m. ET: Americans' Role In Combat

New details have emerged about the combat Americans were involved in this week, as they sought to protect the Kunduz airport from the Taliban.

From Col. Brian Tribus, public affairs director for the Army's mission in Afghanistan:

Fake deer snuck into Wisconsin's annual deer count the past two years.

At least according to a letter sent out on Department of National Resources stationary.

Residents were asked to remove deer lawn ornaments so that they wouldn't be included in this years count.

The department took to Facebook on Wednesday to dispute the story, saying the letter is fake.

But many Wisconsinites had fun with it on Facebook.

Including this concern: "What about the very important annual gnome census?"

You know the British slogan: Keep calm, and carry on.

That attitude saw the British through World War II, and Americans through the financial crisis.

But apparently it does not apply when Facebook crashes.

Numerous police departments report receiving calls when the site goes down.

The last time it happened, Britain's Independent noticed that the Kingston police tweeted: please don't call us.

Houston, Texas, police also tweeted an advisory: "We cannot fix Facebook."

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Russia joined the combat in Syria without coordinating its approach with the United States. Now planes from both nations are bombing targets in Syria.


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A giant clothing retailer has broadened its notion of what a model looks like. H&M produced an ad with an unusually wide variety of people.


UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Look fake. Look chic. Look sheikh. Take a stand.

The cost of getting into some national parks increases on Thursday.

The rates will go up despite the fact that visitation at parks is up, which means bigger crowds, congested traffic and busier visitor centers. But more people aren't translating into a big boost for park budgets. For example, visitation at Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado is up 20 percent so far this year and Yosemite, Yellowstone and Zion are also seeing double-digit increases. The parks are also seeing the strain. About 100 parks are planning an entrance fee hike.

A federal inspection station on Interstate 10 in the West Texas desert earned the nickname "checkpoint of the stars" for all the entertainers who kept getting busted there. In the past six years, Willie Nelson, Snoop Dogg, Nelly and Fiona Apple were all arrested for possession of marijuana.

These days, though, after a decision by a local lawman, everyone from personal pot smokers to medium-size marijuana traffickers can avoid jail.

Whole Foods Market has announced that by April of next year it will stop sourcing foods that are produced using prison labor.

The move comes on the heels of a demonstration in Houston where the company was chastised for employing inmates through prison-work programs.

Michael Allen, founder of End Mass Incarceration Houston, organized the protest. He says Whole Foods was engaging in exploitation since inmates are typically paid very low wages.

In the latest embarrassment for the Secret Service, agents were found to have improperly accessed, shared and potentially released an unsuccessful 2003 Secret Service job application of Republican congressman Jason Chaffetz of Utah, according to a government report.

It says that the agents' actions stemmed from a desire to discredit Chaffetz, who was heading investigations of scandals inside the Secret Service.

It's been exactly one year since the CDC confirmed that Thomas Eric Duncan had Ebola. He had flown from Liberia to Dallas to visit his fiancé, and became the first person diagnosed with the deadly virus on American soil.

During his stay at Texas Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, two nurses also fell ill with Ebola. Duncan died, but the nurses survived, as did a handful of Americans who fell ill in West Africa but were transported back to the United States for care.

Out of the 250 million cars and trucks on U.S. roads, the impending recall at Volkswagen will involve just a half-million of them. But VW's emissions cheating scandal is receiving outsize attention because many of the company's customers feel duped. Now those customers are weighing what it will take to make them feel whole again.

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Emma Green covers religion and culture for The Atlantic, and she joins me now. Welcome to the program.

EMMA GREEN: Thanks for having me.

SIEGEL: Were you surprised to learn about this meeting between the pope and Kim Davis?