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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Ferguson Police Use Tear Gas, Flash Grenades To Disperse Protesters

Police arrest a demonstrator protesting the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson on Monday. At a news conference, President Obama called for calm. "Let's seek to heal rather than wound each other," he said.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 4:36 am

  • What Washington Can, And Can't, Do In Ferguson

Attorney General Eric Holder will be going to Ferguson, Mo., on Wednesday to meet with federal agents and community leaders there, President Obama said in a news conference Monday.

The Justice Department is conducting its own investigation into the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen who was shot by a police officer and whose death has sparked a week of protests.

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All Tech Considered
5:21 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever

Many institutions have their archives stored on CDs — but the discs aren't as stable as once thought. There is no average life span for a CD, says preservationist Michele Youket, "because there is no average disc."
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 8:27 am

Back in the 1990s, historical societies, museums and symphonies across the country began transferring all kinds of information onto what was thought to be a very durable medium: the compact disc.

Now, preservationists are worried that a lot of key information stored on CDs — from sound recordings to public records — is going to disappear. Some of those little silver discs are degrading, and researchers at the Library of Congress are trying to figure out why.

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Environment
5:15 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 7:40 pm

Eric Knapp breaks apart a burned pine cone, looking for seeds — in his line of work this is considered a clue.

"Going into an area after a fire, you almost feel like CSI, you know, sleuthing," Knapp says.

He is standing in a part of the Stanislaus National Forest that was severely burned by the Rim Fire. Knapp, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service, is studying how forests recover.

"It's completely dead," he says. "These trees won't be coming back to life."

A lot of the forest was charred like this.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Met Opera Tentatively Settles With 2 Major Unions

The Metropolitan Opera has settled labor contracts with two of its largest unions.
Jonathan Ticler Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:32 pm

A labor crisis threatening to shut down New York's Metropolitan Opera — the largest opera house in the world — appears to have been averted. Two of the major unions announced a tentative settlement this morning. While agreements with 10 additional unions need to be reached by Tuesday night, this represents a major turning point in a bitter dispute.

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Men In America
5:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

More Men Put Ambitions On Back Burner For Their Partners' Careers

Ricky Nussel will move next year to Ohio from Phoenix for his wife, Amanda Saraf, who is training to be a doctor. The couple has moved several times for Saraf's career and it's been difficult for Nussel to find work along the way.
Peter O'Dowd for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 9:25 am

Ricky Nussle has a map on his living room wall. He can use it to track the moves he has made for his wife, Amanda Saraf, who is training to be a doctor. The first was from Houston to rural Kirksville, Mo. Then to Phoenix. Next year, they'll move again for her fellowship in Columbus, Ohio.

Those moves represent one way families are navigating the American economy today: With more women in the workplace than in previous generations, it's not difficult to find men who are uprooting their careers and moving for their spouses' professional ambitions.

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Around the Nation
5:14 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Amid Continued Chaos In Ferguson, A Second Autopsy Is Released

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:18 pm

A preliminary, independent autopsy report has been released in the shooting death of Michael Brown. Requested by the family, the autopsy finds that Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot six times by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo. This news follows the most violent night of protests there since the shooting.

Iraq
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Man Behind The Islamic State

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

The Soldier's Guiding Paradox: 'Protect What You Love'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:43 pm

Writer Elliot Ackerman, former Marine officer and veteran of five deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, explains what being a man means to him: It's protecting what you love. Unfortunately, that notion is often at odds with the job of a soldier.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Reviews
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Album Review: 'The Voyager'

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Hit Hard By Ebola, Liberia Now Has A Third Treatment Center

A man sits on a bed that will be part a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, run by Doctors Without Borders.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 10:46 am

The Ebola outbreak has been spreading through Liberia with alarming speed — more than 780 cases, with 100 identified over a recent two-day period. Yet for weeks there have been only two places in the country where patients could get medical care, one in the country's rural north and one in the capital, Monrovia.

Doctors Without Borders has now opened a third facility.

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Energy
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Oklahoma Wind Power Companies Run Into Headwinds

A wind-powered water pump and a wind-driven electricity turbine share a field near the town of Calumet in western Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz NPR

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 6:57 am

Oklahoma is the nation's fourth-largest generator of wind energy. But wind developers in the northeast corner of the state, where the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve lies, are up against stiff opposition from an unlikely pair of allies: environmentalists and oil interests.

Bob Hamilton, director of the Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, has been fighting to block construction of a 68-turbine wind farm.

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Law
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

What Washington Can, And Can't, Do In Ferguson

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:18 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
4:16 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

A Map To Memory Lane: Providence Tries To Keep Street Names Straight

Originally published on Mon August 18, 2014 6:18 pm

The city of Providence is embarking on a project to sort out street names that sound alike or have similar spellings. Peter Gaynor, who runs the city's Emergency Management Agency, talks to Robert Siegel about Operation Karat — not "carrot," mind you.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
3:40 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

'Sweetness #9' Satirizes Food Wars And Artificial America

iStockphoto.com

When author Stephan Eirik Clark read Fast Food Nation in 2001, he didn't know it would inspire him to write a fictional account of the food industry.

"Flavorings were like gravity or electricity — something that was all around me but that I had never paid any attention to," Clark tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "And as soon as I read that book and its chapter on food product design, I started to ask myself, 'How important are these to the foods?' I started to question if I was really eating food or just the idea of food."

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Music
3:40 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Box Set Looks Back On Pioneering '5' Royales

Soul music is often defined as the moment when gospel and blues met and formed a new sound. Ray Charles is often given credit for this, but there were others, most notably the "5" Royales, who had immense success as a live act, but never sold as many records as such a pioneering group should have. With the release of the 131-track collection Soul and Swagger: The Complete "5" Royales, the group has finally gotten the recognition they deserve. Fresh Air critic Ed Ward has the story.

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