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Picking a mate can be one of life's most important decisions. But sometimes people make a choice that seems to make no sense at all. And humans aren't the only ones — scientists have now seen apparently irrational romantic decisions in frogs.

Little tungara frogs live in Central America, and they're found everywhere from forests to ditches to parking lot puddles. These frogs are only about 2 centimeters long, but they are loud. The males make calls to woo the females.

His power and talent tested the nuts and bolts of basketball — literally. Darryl Dawkins, who became famous for backboard-shattering dunks after he was the first NBA player to skip college altogether, has died at age 58.

Lehigh Carbon Community College, where Dawkins coached for two seasons, says:

Parents, teachers and activists are fighting to defend a high school the Chicago Public School Board voted to close several years ago. They say officials who called for proposals on what type of school to reopen are ignoring their plan.

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Simmons College announced it will close the campus master's degree program in business, the only one of its kind in the nation exclusively for women.

The National Portrait Gallery says it has no plans to heed calls by conservatives and anti-abortion activists to remove a bust of Margaret Sanger from an exhibit on civil rights. Sanger, who died in 1966, was an early supporter and activist for the birth control movement and the founder of Planned Parenthood.

NPR's Pam Fessler tells our Newscast unit that "the demands are part of a larger campaign against Planned Parenthood, after its employees were recorded talking about providing fetal tissue to medical researchers."

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In many cities around the U.S., thousands of young adults have toxic levels of lead in their blood from growing up in rundown housing built before 1950. Lead poisoning – from eating peeling paint and breathing paint dust – can lead to learning disabilities, irreversible brain damage, and impulse problems.

According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, African Americans are disproportionately affected, with black children nearly three times more likely than white children to have elevated blood levels.

Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

Tropical Storm Erika has caused extensive flooding and landslides on the eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, killing at least four people and cutting power and water to many residents.

The storm dumped 9 inches of rain on the mountainous island late Wednesday.

"The situation is grim. It is dangerous," Ian Pinard, Dominica's communications minister, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

Only few days after its birth, the smaller of the two newborn panda cubs at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo has died. Brandie Smith, associate director for animal care sciences at Smithsonian’s National Zoo speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the death of the cub and why it is so difficult for twin pandas to survive.

Guest

Oxford Dictionaries has added a slew of new words, and let's just say these awesomesauce entries will have you fangirling. Rly.

Many entries are food-related:

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, is New Orleans better protected? The answer is complicated.

Historian John Barry says Louisiana’s new master plan for flood protection could help save the city, but it will cost billions of dollars and he wonders whether the political will exists to put it into place.

Barry says the plan faces several challenges, including sea level rise, due to land loss he says is caused in part by the energy industry, and the 100-year flood protection standard. He joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about it.

The season hasn’t even started yet but several college football coaches are already on the hot seat for a variety of reasons.

USC coach Steve Sarkisian made a drunken speech at a USC rally; Rutgers coach Kyle Flood allegedly contacted a faculty member about a player who was in danger of being ruled academically ineligible and Baylor coach Art Briles is under fire because he accepted a transfer who had a violent past.

An anti-abortion rights group that has been targeting Planned Parenthood with undercover sting videos, released its eighth clip this week.

The hidden camera videos, which are heavily edited, claim to show that the organization profits from sales of fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood denies that claim, saying the tissues are donated for research and that the organization is reimbursed for the costs of transporting the tissue to researchers.

There are signs today that the U.S economy is weathering uncertainty across the globe. The U.S. Commerce Department says gross domestic product grew at a 3.7 percent rate in the second quarter, which is an upward revision from the 2.3 percent growth rate that had been reported last month.

As immigration emerges as a top issue on the presidential campaign trail, all this week Here & Now is looking at the U.S. immigration system. So often, the debate over immigration centers on those who are here illegally. But the majority of immigrants to the United States come legally. More often than not, it’s a complicated process that can take many years.

A former student at St. Paul’s School, an elite New Hampshire prep school, is on trial for allegedly raping a freshman girl two days before graduation in 2014. The alleged assault is suspected to be part of a longstanding hook-up tradition at the Concord, New Hampshire, boarding school. Paige Sutherland from Here & Now contributor New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

This week, students arriving at Old Dominion University could see banners hanging from a Sigma Nu fraternity house. “Rowdy and fun, hope your baby girl is ready for a good time,” and “freshman daughter drop off.” The signs were criticized for mocking sexual violence against women, and sparked national outrage.

A new Chinese action musical is holding its U.S. premiere on a stage in Denver. “Terracotta Warriors 3D” is a live performance piece centered around the story of China’s first emperor, who was buried with an army of clay soldiers. It’s part of an effort to spread Chinese culture around the world. Corey Jones from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio reports.

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday ordered three tobacco companies to stop claiming their cigarettes are "additive-free" or "natural."

The agency said those claims could mislead smokers into thinking those cigarettes are safer than others.

Polio is almost gone from the face of the earth. The virus is actively circulating in only two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan. But now there's a worrisome new development in the polio end-game.

In Thursday's edition of the journal PLoS Pathogens, scientists report on a man in the United Kingdom who was immunized with oral polio vaccine as a child and whose stool samples continued to contain live polio virus for 28 years.

The images continue to haunt: storm surge from Hurricane Katrina pouring through gaps in failed flood walls, rapidly rising waters, desperate New Orleanians trapped on rooftops.

For elite Jamaican runner Usain Bolt, Thursday's 200-meter sprint was like many other races he's won — until a mobile cameraman lost control of his Segway and took the world's fastest man down from behind. Bolt, who had been waving to the crowd, collapsed in a heap. He had been walking barefoot on the track.

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Dr. Bill Mahon was a young pediatrician in the early 1970s when he fell in love with the rugged coast and majestic redwoods of Mendocino County, Calif. Like other people who have moved to Mendocino from around the country, settling here for him was a personal choice that prioritized lifestyle over money.

The prospect of practicing medicine in a small community also called to him. In 1977 he left his well-paying job at Kaiser Sacramento to join a practice with two other pediatricians in Fort Bragg.

Still, the move was a risk.

In a new report and letter sent to congressional leadership, Planned Parenthood contends that controversial videos alleging the organization sells fetal tissue have been "heavily edited in order to significantly change the meaning" of what its staff said.

A Kentucky county clerk's office denied a marriage license for a same-sex couple on Thursday, despite a federal appeals court ruling the night before that upheld a judge's order compelling her to issue the licenses.

Citing religious objections, Kim Davis of Rowan County has refused to issue any marriage licenses since the Supreme Court's ruling June 26 that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide.

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