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Crime in America may be on the rise again. It's too early to talk about a national trend, but there have been troubling spikes in shootings and murders in big cities such as New York, Baltimore and Los Angeles.

Until recently, crime decreased steadily for two decades, and the national murder rate is half what it was in the early 1990s — so police departments are under pressure to crack down. But at the same time, their tactics are under more scrutiny from the public, and they have to be careful not to appear too heavy-handed.

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After last week's same-sex marriage ruling, gay activists face a big question - what's next? A campaign is underway to ask LGBT people across the country that question. NPR's Jeff Brady attended one of the campaign's forums in Allentown, Pa.

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If you want to fly in or out of Delaware, good luck, unless you have your own plane or the cash to charter one.

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It's Like It Never Happened: A 'Terminator' Dossier

Jul 1, 2015

In 1984, a $6.4 million sci-fi chase flick by a skinny 29-year-old whose prior feature directing credit was a T&A horror flick called Piranha II: The Spawning became a surprise hit, launching the career of future King of the World and depths-plumbing oceanographer James Cameron. He'd sold his screenplay and his rights to The Terminator to his future ex-wife, producer Gale Anne Hurd, for $1 and the promise that he would direct the movie.

The Justice Department says it is investigating "possible unlawful coordination" by several major airline carriers. American, Delta, Southwest and United Airlines have all confirmed receiving letters from the Justice Department.

In a statement, American said the department "seeks documents and information from the last two years that are related to statements and decisions about airline capacity."

A United spokesman said the company is complying fully in regard to the probe.

Militants launched a number of deadly attacks on checkpoints in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula early Wednesday. A group linked to the so-called Islamic State claimed responsibility.

Merrit Kennedy filed this report from Cairo for Newscast:

"In Egypt, militants launched a coordinated series of assaults in the restive north Sinai peninsula. The military says 17 soldiers were killed, though local security officials earlier in the day said more than 50 soldiers were killed.

Recreational marijuana is legal in Oregon as of today.

People 21 and older can now possess up to an ounce of pot when away from home and up to 8 ounces at home. It's also legal to grow up to four plants per household.

Few days went by last year when New Hampshire nephrologist Ana Stankovic didn't receive a payment from a drug company.

If you run into an old friend at the train station, your brain will probably form a memory of the experience. And that memory will forever link the person you saw with the place where you saw him.

On Tuesday evening, flames engulfed the 100-year-old Mount Zion AME, a historically black church in Greeleyville, S.C. Authorities are still investigating the cause.

There’s an old myth that humans only use 10 percent of their brains. While that’s been proven to be an old wives’ tale, what is true, according to scientists, is that human beings can better harness their brain power.

Researchers are already looking at a number of technologies they think will make people smarter, starting with drugs and moving all the way to chips implanted in our brains – chips that would have constant access to the Internet, and maybe to each other, as well.

The U.S. territory of Puerto Rico has more than $70 billion in debt it can’t pay. Some are calling the island America’s Greece. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson looks at the roots of the problem with someone who wrote a report on the island’s financial crisis.

Singer-songwriter and four-time Grammy winner Joy Williams is a true American artist. Born just outside of Santa Cruz, California, she grew up listening to Billie Holiday and Janis Joplin. She later stole a lot of hearts as one half of the now-disbanded folk/Americana duo The Civil Wars.

Thousands of visitors will travel to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, this week to mark the 152nd anniversary of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. They come to stand in the battlefield’s most storied places, like Little Round Top or Devil’s Den, and imagine the battle those landscapes witnessed.

President Obama announced today that Cuba and the United States have agreed to reopen their embassies in Washington and Havana. It’s a major step in restoring diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Guillermo Grenier, professor in the Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University, about what the move means for both countries.

Since the 1950s, Delaware-based high-tech engineering company W. L. Gore & Associates, most famous for Gore-Tex outdoor apparel, has been a non-hierarchical workplace where few employees have titles and anyone can take leadership positions.

Greece’s government is offering concessions to its creditors, in an attempt to get more aid, hours after it failed to pay a nearly $2 billion loan back to the IMF.

In a letter to creditors, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras offered a fresh proposal for budget cuts and policy changes, saying he’d stick with what Greek voters say in Sunday’s referendum. But many European officials dismissed the proposal as falling short of their demands.

After the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, couples in states around the country rushed to courthouses to get marriage licenses. Many states that had been hold-outs, including Michigan, shifted policies very quickly.

But in some places in the South, including counties in Alabama, clerks are pushing back. One clerk in Arkansas has reportedly quit in opposition. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR reporter Debbie Elliott about the trend.

The Supreme Court’s recent ruling on same-sex marriage is a striking reminder of the strides LGBT Americans have made toward acceptance in recent years.

But it wasn’t very long ago that the broader society treated them with scorn. That’s clear from a 1961 television documentary called “The Rejected.” It was one of the first to openly address sexual orientation, and was considered progressive at the time.

Facebook is millennials’ No. 1 source for political news, according to a recent study by Pew Research Center. Now, other social media outlets are trying to get on board.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with media analyst John Carroll about social networks’ stampede to become news outlets and get journalists on staff.

Pinpointing the most important conversation in Magic Mike XXL is, admittedly, a little like pinpointing the most important zoological computer model in Jurassic World, but let's do it anyway.

The FBI is investigating a string of recent physical attacks on Internet cables in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Powerful antipsychotic medications are being used to treat children and teenagers with ADHD, aggression and behavior problems, a study finds, even though safer treatments are available and should be used first.

Scallop fishermen off the East Coast could soon see one of their biggest bumper crops ever. A federal survey in waters off Delaware is predicting a boom in the next couple of years for the nation's most valuable fishery.

Every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration looks for young sea scallops on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. This year, when they stuck their camera in the water, they got a huge shock, says Dvora Hart, a research analyst with NOAA's Fisheries Service.

There are signs that the race for the Democratic presidential nomination is heating up. As Bernie Sanders rises in many early polls, his economic agenda is drawing the fire of some of Hillary Clinton's supporters.

AUGUSTA, Maine - The day started out pretty well for Gov. LePage. He greeted nearly 100 supporters at the State House during an impromptu rally praising his budget priorities and "get tough" approach with legislators.

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