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A federal judge has approved a plan to resolve thousands of NFL concussion lawsuits that could cost the league $1 billion over 65 years.

The league expects 6,000 of nearly 20,000 retired players will suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or moderate dementia eventually, and the settlement approved yesterday would pay them an average of $190,000.

Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca discusses the settlement with host Robin Young.

For our series Tracking Lincoln, Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd is following the route of Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train, 150 years after his assassination. President Lincoln was best known for his effort to keep the Union together during the Civil War, and the Emancipation Proclamation, which called for the end of slavery. Peter reports from Cleveland, Ohio, that Lincoln’s legacy on race remains relevant today.

Henry Diltz is a former musician who took some of the most iconic photos of the 1960s and ’70s, many of which graced the covers of groundbreaking albums. Crosby Stills and Nash, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, the Doors, the Eagles, all became friends and subjects.

The Texas House State Affairs Committee has passed a bill that would ban state and local funds from being used to issue marriage licenses to gay couples.

The vote comes despite a U.S. Supreme Court hearing taking place next week to rule on whether gay marriage bans are constitutional.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Bobby Blanchard, a reporter for The Texas Tribune, about the committee vote.

Big farms are collecting taxpayer dollars that they haven’t necessarily earned, by taking advantage of a loophole in government subsidy rules, according to regulators, members of Congress and the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is taking aim at what is known as the “actively engaged” loophole, which has been gaping for nearly three decades, by changing the qualifications for some subsidy payments.

Mike Barry of The Guardian joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to look at how the news is reverberating on social media. The stories include:

If “Full House” was a major part of your childhood, you might get a kick out of this. Netflix announced this week that it’s coming back – as “Fuller House.”

John Stamos – or Uncle Jesse – will produce the new series, and will also reprise his role, along with some of his old co-stars (though not all).

“Full House” is just the latest in a parade of old favorites that seem to be returning to television. There’s also “Arrested Development,” “The X-Files,” “Coach,” “Twin Peaks,” “Boy Meets World” (reimagined as “Girl Meets World”), “Bewitched” and the list goes on.

The Senate voted Thursday, 56-43, to approve the nomination of Loretta Lynch to serve as U.S. attorney general, ending a more than five month-long political impasse that had stalled her bid to become the first black woman to lead the Justice Department.

Lynch, 55, grew up in the shadow of the civil rights movement in North Carolina, where her family had preached for generations. Most recently, she prosecuted terrorists, mobsters and white collar criminals as the top federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, a district that covers 8 million people.

He plays for Cleveland now — but when the NFL's Dwayne Bowe heard that one of the former Kansas City Chiefs' biggest fans had died, he flew to Missouri to attend the funeral of Betty Johnson, age 86.

The gesture is perhaps the most notable of several made by a team whose players called Johnson, a long-time season ticket holder and retired school-bus driver, "Grandma."

Bowe, who has been a star receiver in the NFL, spent eight seasons in Kansas City before the team released him this year. He signed a new contract with the Cleveland Browns last month.

NPR's Tovia Smith is covering the sentencing phase of the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial in Boston. A jury is weighing whether the 21-year-old convicted in the bombings that killed three people and left 264 others wounded should be put to death for his crimes. Tovia will be tweeting developments as they happen.

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Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And al-Qaida is at the center of a pretty stunning announcement from the White House this morning. President Obama said two hostages of al-Qaida, including an American, were killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Regardless of our cooking prowess, all of us have undoubtedly spent some time in the kitchen. We all need to eat, and our preferences are intensely personal. Yet food is often overlooked in the biographies of anyone who wasn't a chef or gastronomic icon.

Giovanni Lo Porto, the Italian aid worker inadvertently killed in a U.S. operation in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, was abducted Jan. 19, 2012, soon after he arrived in Pakistan to begin work for a German NGO.

The simple act of thinking can accelerate the growth of many brain tumors.

That's the conclusion of a paper in Cell published Thursday that showed how activity in the cerebral cortex affected high-grade gliomas, which represent about 80 percent of all malignant brain tumors in people.

In American English, some slang words come and go. And some stay and stay.

Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest bank, has been fined $2.5 billion by U.S. and U.K. regulators for trying to manipulate the so-called LIBOR rate, a benchmark for interbank loans, which in turn is used to set interest rates on everything from credit card debt to mortgages.

The German bank is one of eight financial institutions, including Swiss-based UBS and the Royal Bank of Scotland, that were caught up in the scandal, which involved dozens of traders and managers and spanned a four-year period from 2005-2009.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

President Obama offered his "grief and condolences" to the families of the American and Italian aid workers killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation in January. Both men were held hostage by al-Qaida.

"I take full responsibility for a U.S. government counterterrorism operation that killed two innocent hostages held by al-Qaida," Obama said.

The Calbuco volcano in southern Chile erupted this week for the first time in four decades. Quiet since 1972, it's blown twice since Wednesday, generating striking images and concerns over the effects of both the lava and a mammoth cloud of ash.

For the first time, scientists have edited DNA in human embryos, a highly controversial step long considered off limits.

Junjiu Huang and his colleagues at the Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China, performed a series of experiments involving 86 human embryos to see if they could make changes in a gene known as HBB, which causes the sometimes fatal blood disorder beta-thalassemia.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

The European Union has agreed to more ships, planes and helicopters to patrol the Mediterranean in hopes of stopping migrants from Africa and the Middle East and stopping people smugglers who facilitate them.

At an emergency summit in Brussels, Britain pledged three ships, while Germany and France said they would provide two each. Belgium, Ireland, Latvia and Lithuania were also to supply ships, patrol boats and helicopters.

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Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET Friday

Former CIA Director and retired Gen. David Petraeus was sentenced Thursday to two years of probation and handed a $100,000 fine for the unauthorized removal and retention of classified material, in the form of notebooks he shared with his lover.

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Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a story of an unrepentant offender. Lucas Hinch was having trouble with his Dell computer, so he did something. He took that computer into an alley in Colorado Springs, and he shot the Dell with a 9 mm pistol eight times.

Despite Saudi Arabia's announcement earlier this week that a coalition would wind down the nearly month-old military campaign it has been waging in Yemen, warplanes have been hitting areas under Houthi control Thursday. It's now very unclear when peace talks that were mentioned earlier this week might occur.

From Riyadh, NPR's Leila Fadel reports for our Newscast unit:

"The Saudis had said that although strikes were ending, they would use force against Houthi movements inside the poor Gulf country.

The parents of Michael Brown, the unarmed man whom a Ferguson, Mo., police officer shot and killed last August, have filed a civil lawsuit against the city, along with former police chief Thomas Jackson and Darren Wilson, the now-former officer who shot Brown, 18.

The lawsuit was filed by Michael Brown Sr. and Lesley McSpadden at the St. Louis County Courthouse Thursday morning. It says Wilson "unjustifiably shot and killed" Brown, using "an unnecessary and unreasonable" amount of force.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Privately run Medicare plans, fresh off a lobbying victory that reversed proposed budget cuts, face new scrutiny from government investigators and whistleblowers who allege that plans have overcharged the government for years.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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