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The Two-Way
1:21 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Gaza Conflict: What To Know For Friday

Smoke and flames from an Israeli strike rise over Gaza City on Thursday.
Adel Hana AP

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 5:34 pm

Updated at 5:35 p.m. ET.

As the conflict between Israel and Gaza approaches the three-week mark, the fighting seems to have only intensified. At least 119 Palestinians were killed Thursday, making it the bloodiest day of the war.

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Men In America
6:22 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

When One Size Doesn't Fit All: A Man's Quest To Find An Extra-Small

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 4:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
6:22 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Montana Senator Comes Under Fire For Plagiarism Allegations

Sen. John Walsh of Montana was appointed to his seat in February, and he's preparing to face voters for the first time. The Democrat's bid will likely be complicated by allegations of plagiarism, reported by The New York Times. It seems that in a paper Walsh submitted for his master's degree from the U.S. Army War College, long passages were borrowed without attribution.

Goats and Soda
6:15 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

UNICEF Report On Female Genital Mutilation Holds Hope And Woe

For 15 years, Amran Mahamood made a living circumcising young girls in Hargeysa, Somalia. Four years ago, she gave it up after a religious leader convinced her that Islamic law did not require it.
Nichole Sobecki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 10:00 am

Women and girls are less likely to undergo female genital mutilation, or FGM, than 30 years ago. That's the encouraging news from a UNICEF report on the controversial practice, presented this week at London's first Girl Summit.

The rate has dropped in many of the 29 countries across Africa and the Middle East where FGM is practiced. In Kenya, for example, nearly half the girls age 15 to 19 were circumcised in 1980; in 2010 the rate was just under 20 percent.

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Men In America
6:04 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

The Evolution Of The 'Esquire' Man, In 10 Revealing Covers

Issued in the midst of the Korean War, this cover makes clear that that even though styles may change, some topics have stayed constant: fashion, sports and scantily clad women.
Courtesy of Esquire

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 7:50 pm

This summer, All Things Considered has been exploring what it means to be a man in America today — from a second look at popular notions of masculinity and men's style, to attitudes toward women — and how all those ideas have shifted over time.

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The Salt
5:30 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

The Weird, Underappreciated World Of Plastic Packaging

Food companies spend a lot of time and resources coming up with the perfect plastic packaging to keep their products fresh.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 3:51 pm

Like it or not, plastic packaging has become an ingrained part of the food system.

While it's clearly wasteful to buy salad, sandwiches and chips encased in plastic and then promptly throw that plastic away, we take for granted how it keeps so much of what we eat fresh and portable.

And behind many of those packages that allow us to eat on the go or savor perishable cookies or fish imported from the other side of the globe is a whole lot of science and innovation.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

DOJ Reaches Agreement For Oversight Of Albuquerque PD

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:03 pm

The mayor of Albuquerque has signed off on a framework of principles to submit the city's troubled police department to oversight by an independent monitor.

The deal, announced by the Justice Department, is aimed at addressing eight problem areas identified in a report last year by officials.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:25 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Labor Conflict May Lock Out Met Opera Workers

Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers of a lockout if a contract deal isn't settled by July 31.
Astrid Stawiarz Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

The clock is ticking for the Metropolitan Opera in New York. The world's largest opera company may be headed for a shutdown. Most of the union contracts for the Met expire in a week. Yesterday, Met General Manager Peter Gelb sent a letter to the unions, warning them to prepare for a lockout if they don't come to terms.

For months now, the company and its unions have been at an impasse. Management has proposed cutting 16 percent of union members' compensation. Otherwise, Gelb contends, the company could go bankrupt in two to three years.

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Author Interviews
4:21 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

When It Comes To Creativity, Are Two Heads Better Than One?

Brothers and aviation pioneers Orville and Wilbur Wright walk together in 1910.
National Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 5:52 pm

Joshua Wolf Shenk doesn't believe in the myth of the lone genius. "What has one person ever done alone?" he asks NPR's Robert Siegel. "We think of Martin Luther King and Sigmund Freud and Warren Buffett and Steve Jobs as these great solo creators, but in fact, if you look into the details of their life, they are enmeshed in relationships all the way through."

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Parallels
4:21 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Who Are The Kids Of The Migrant Crisis?

Volunteers such as this woman — who's with a group that calls itself "Las Patronas" — throw bags of food and water to migrants in Veracruz, Mexico, who are headed toward the U.S.-Mexico border.
Courtesy of Deborah Bonello

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:23 pm

Since October, a staggering 57,000 unaccompanied migrant children have been apprehended at the southwestern U.S. border. Sometimes, they've been welcomed into the country by activists; other times they've been turned away by protesters.

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Monkey See
4:19 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

5 Things I Learned About TV's Future From The Critics Press Tour

Noah Hawley (left) and Warren Littlefield, executive producers of the FX series Fargo, speak at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 7:09 pm

The voice came from over my shoulder, a shouted greeting in a room crowded with journalists, publicists, network executives, producers and stars.

I tuned to see David Boreanaz, star of the Fox TV show Bones, calling out to me like a long-lost friend. I knew he had mistaken me for someone else — in a party held by Fox at the exclusive Soho House club, where everyone from Kelsey Grammer to David Tennant was sipping cocktails and talking shop, it wasn't hard to make that kind of mistake.

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Shots - Health News
4:15 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

For Better Treatment, Doctors And Patients Share The Decisions

When weighing the risk of heart disease, how the numbers are presented to patients can make all the difference.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:22 pm

Many of us get confused by claims of how much the risk of a heart attack, for example, might be reduced by taking medicine for it. And doctors can get confused, too.

Just ask Karen Sepucha. She runs the Health Decisions Sciences Center at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital. A few years ago she surveyed primary care physicians, and asked how confident they were in their ability to talk about numbers and probabilities with patients.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

U.S. Teens Still Lag In Getting Vaccinated Against HPV

Dr. Donald Brown inoculated Kelly Kent with the HPV vaccine in his Chicago office in the summer of 2006 — not long after the first version of the vaccine reached the market.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 6:11 pm

Though the vaccine against human papilloma virus is highly effective in preventing certain forms of cancer, the number of preteens getting the vaccine is still dismally low, doctors from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.

"One of the top five reasons parents listed is that it hadn't been recommended to them by a doctor or nurse," the CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat told reporters at a press briefing.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Modern-Day Amelia Earhart Circumnavigates The Globe

Amelia Rose Earhart takes a selfie in the cockpit during her around-the-world flight. (Courtesy Amelia Rose Earhart)

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 10:56 pm

Amelia Earhart was born 117 years ago today. She disappeared in July 1937 over the South Pacific, attempting to fly solo around the globe.

Earlier this month, another Amelia Earhart — no relation — completed a similar flight, and became the youngest woman to fly a single-engine aircraft around the world.

This Earhart’s journey was slightly different from that of her namesake, as she avoided conflicts in the Middle East, monsoon season in India, and locations where she couldn’t land as an American citizen. But in the end, ten stops overlapped between the two flight plans.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Why Don't We Eat Our Own Fish?

The seafood counter at Whole Foods Market in Hillsboro, Ore. is pictured Sept. 10, 2010. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

Paul Greenberg‘s new book “American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood,” explains how lopsided the U.S. fishing market really is.

Most of the fish Americans eat is imported — about 90 percent. At the same time, the U.S. is exporting about one-third of its catch.

So why aren’t we eating what we catch?

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