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3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

More Than 20 Major Wildfires Burning In Oregon And Washington

A DC-10 air tanker pulls up after dropping fire retardant over a wildfire Saturday, July 19, 2014, near Carlton, Wash. (Elaine Thompson/AP)

Nearly a million acres are burning across Oregon and Washington, in more than 20 major wildfires. Thousands of firefighters are working to contain them and the military is now sending in air tankers to help.

So far, at least 150 structures have burned in Washington, and one man has died trying to protect his home. Sheriff Frank Rogers in Okanogan County in north-central Washington says he’s never seen anything like this in 30 years.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Why Hot Cars Are So Deadly

National Highway Transportation Safety Administration officials demonstrate how hot it can get inside a parked car with a demonstration outside of the Medical Center of Central Georgia in Macon, Georgia. (Adam Ragusea)

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:22 am

It’s an annual summer tragedy. So far this year, 17 children in the U.S. have died of heat stroke inside a parked car. Some of those cases have been getting extra attention this summer, but that number is not unusual. Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Adam Ragusea looked into the science that explains how a parked car can get so hot, so fast.

It’s a sunny, summer day in Macon, Georgia. I’m standing with Matt Marone outside his truck, and the A.C. is on full blast.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Battle Survivor Receives Medal Of Honor

With his wife Amy watching, Ryan Pitts walks on the stage to talk with reporters in Concord, N.H., last month. (Jim Cole/AP)

Nine American soldiers died in the Battle of Wanat in 2008. But according to his commanding officers, more men would have been killed if not for the actions of Staff Sgt. Ryan Pitts on that day in Afghanistan.

Pitts fought back while badly wounded when hundreds of Taliban fighters attacked Operation Topside, which the soldiers were building in Waygal Valley.

Pitts’ actions, they say, turned the tide of the battle and today at the White House, President Obama will drape the Medal of Honor around his neck.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

The History Of Tunnel Warfare

In this photo taken Sunday, April 11, 2010, a Palestinian smuggler works inside a tunnel in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip. (Adel Hana/AP)

This past week, much of the of the Israeli mission in Gaza has focused on targeting the tunnels used by Hamas to transport weapons and supplies, as well as launching attacks and moving troops.

Tunnel warfare is not a new phenomenon. Since as early as the 9th century BC, when Assyrian forces would attempt to dig under enemy fortifications and destroy their walls, tunnel warfare has been a constant strategy in siege warfare worldwide.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Fighting Rages On In Middle East

Relatives of Palestinians killed during the overnight shelling of the eastern Gaza district of Shejaiya by the Israeli army arrive at the morgue of the al-Shifa hospital on July 20, 2014 in Gaza City. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

The United Nations Security Council is calling for an immediate cease fire between the Israelis and the Palestinians, as Secretary of State John Kerry makes another bid for peace in a trip to Cairo.

After nearly two weeks of fighting, the Palestinian death toll tops 500, mostly civilians, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry.

At least 20 Israelis have died so far — 13 of those are soldiers killed yesterday, the fourth day of Israel’s ground offensive into Gaza.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Week In Politics: Ukraine, Israel And The Border

President Barack Obama speaks to the press outside the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 21, 2014. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is to push for an immediate ceasefire in Gaza when he arrives later Monday in Cairo, President Obama said. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State John Kerry is on his way to Cairo today, to participate in ceasefire talks with Israel and Hamas.

This past weekend, he said that U.S. intelligence found the evidence against Russian-backed separatists stacking up over the downing of a Malaysian airplane over Ukraine on Thursday. And the immigration crisis at the border, along with the debate over it in Washington, continues.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Are We Entering A Golden Age Of Neuroscience?

“We still haven’t unlocked the mystery of the three pounds of matter between our ears. That knowledge could be — will be — transformative,” President Obama said in announcing the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative on April 2, 2013, at the White House. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

President Obama has committed an initial $100 million to a project called “BRAIN,” which stands for Brain Research through Advancing Neurotechnologies, to fund the development tools to study how the brain works. He says the transformative research will help us “better understand how we think and how we learn and how we remember.”

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Crash Investigation Expert Weighs In On Flight MH17

Luggage and personal belongings from Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 lie in a field on July 20, 2014 in Grabovo, Ukraine. Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was travelling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur when it crashed killing all 298 on board including 80 children. The aircraft was allegedly shot down by a missile and investigations continue over the perpetrators of the attack. (Rob Stothard/Getty Images)

There are still many questions and few answers related to the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 that crashed Thursday, killing all 298 passengers aboard. The commercial airliner may have been shot down by a missile along the Russian and Ukraine border.

Jim Hall, former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the steps that would normally be taken after a plane crash.

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NPR Story
3:11 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Chinese Buyers Snap Up Real Estate In The U.S.

A sale pending sign is posted in front of a home for sale on July 17, 2014 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 4:13 pm

Foreign buyers have helped boost luxury real estate prices in places such as Manhattan for several years now. But that trend may soon push into non-luxury markets across the United States.

The real estate website Zillow soon plans to publish its for-sale listings in Mandarin. Diane Francis of the National Post joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to discuss the recent announcement.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's Friend Convicted For Impeding Bombing Inquiry

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 3:30 pm

Azamat Tazhayakov, a friend of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev who police say impeded their investigation of the 2013 attack, has been convicted on some of the charges against him and found not guilty of others.

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The Salt
1:54 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

From Scratch Or Not? French Restaurant Law Stirs Controversy

A new logo that is supposed to ensure a Paris restaurant's food is homemade (fait maison in French) is already stirring up controversy.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 5:04 pm

If you go to France this summer, you might notice a new logo in restaurant windows or on menus. It's a simple graphic of a rooftop covering a saucepan, and it's supposed to designate fait maison, or homemade. It's designed to highlight places that make their own dishes rather than bringing in frozen or sous vide — prepared meals cooked in a water bath, sealed in airtight plastic bags and designed to be heated up later.

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Politics
1:53 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Longtime LGBT Activist Reflects On The Early Days Of Her Advocacy

In 1972, Madeline Davis argued for the Democratic party to embrace gay rights. In this encore broadcast, Davis remembers her historic speech and the evolution of the gay rights movement.

Technology
1:53 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Why Diversity In Tech Matters: 'People Solve Problems That They See'

Host Michel Martin talks to a roundtable of activists and innovators about the future of technology, and recruiting the next generation of African-Americans and Latinos into the tech field.

Music
1:53 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

For TMM Intern, Robert Glasper's 'Black Radio' Expands Category Of Hip-Hop

As Tell Me More enters its final weeks of production, intern Miles Johnson shares his favorite songs for the program's 'In Your Ear' series.

Goats and Soda
12:47 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Straightening Sisay's Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy's Life

Andrew Dickinson Andrew Dickinson for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:57 pm

One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.

Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kicked an empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.

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