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4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

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Health
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Who Should Be First In Line To Receive A Transplant Organ?

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Organ transplants have become a viable option for a growing number of patients. That has brought increased attention to legal, medical and ethical questions about who should be first in line for organs. Undocumented immigrants and others say they are left off waiting list due to lack of funds and inability to access government health care programs.

Shots - Health News
3:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Hospital Patients, Observation Status Can Prove Costly

The next bed could cost you a lot if the hospital says you're there on observation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:25 am

If you're on Medicare and you're in the hospital for a few days, you may think you're an inpatient. The hospital may have other ideas. Increasingly, hospitals are placing older patients on "observation status." They may be there for days, but technically they're still outpatients.

This is a big deal for someone on Medicare because follow-up treatment in a nursing home isn't covered unless someone has been an inpatient for at least three days. That's leaving some seniors on the hook for thousands of dollars in nursing home bills.

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Law
3:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

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The Salt
3:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

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All Tech Considered
3:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Biographers, The Past Is An Open (Electronic) Book

Digital ephemera can capture things that don't appear in official accounts of events — but the material's in danger of disappearing if it's in obsolete formats.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 1:00 pm

For centuries, biographers have relied on letters to bring historical figures to life, whether Gandhi or Catherine the Great. But as people switch from writing on paper to documenting their lives electronically, biographers are encountering new benefits — and new challenges.

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Sweetness And Light
2:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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The Two-Way
1:19 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Ariel Castro, Ohio Man Who Held Women For Years, Is Dead

Ariel Castro in court on July 17.
Marvin Fong The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:41 pm

Corrections officials in Ohio say convicted Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro is believed to have committed suicide in his cell Tuesday night.

They say he was found hanged around 9:20 p.m. EDT at the Correctional Reception Center in Orient, Ohio, a short distance southwest of Columbus.

Castro was serving a life sentence for holding three women captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade.

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The Two-Way
6:10 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

5 Years After Being Covered With Water, Chinese Village Emerges

A July photo shows houses that have emerged from Tangjiashan Barrier Lake in Xuanping Township, in southwest China's Sichuan Province.
Liu Huawei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:11 pm

It's been a long time since the people who lived in rural Xuanping saw their little town, which was flooded by a powerful earthquake in 2008. But thanks to a steep drop in water levels, parts of their village in China's Sichuan Province are visible again, from homes and businesses to its school.

The village's ghostly return began in July, when water levels fell from 712 meters to 703 meters above sea level — a difference of nearly 30 feet, as news site China Daily Asia reported.

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Business
5:28 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Spirit Airlines Sees Business Take Off With Raunchy Ads

Spirit Airlines has gotten notice — and criticism — for its racy ads.
Courtesy of Spirit Airlines

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

South Florida-based Spirit Airlines is known for being cheap. It boasts "ultralow" base fares and then charges for items such as carry-on luggage or printing out your boarding pass at the airport.

That thrift carries over to Spirit's advertising. Even compared with other low-cost airlines, Spirit spends almost nothing on ads. And yet the company makes a surprising splash with its campaigns. A visit to Spirit headquarters reveals the secrets of its marketing.

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Code Switch
5:15 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

The Wondrous, Melancholy Worlds Of Hayao Miyazaki

Hayao Miyazaki's film My Neighbor Totoro features the young sisters Mei and Satsuki, seen here sitting next to the whimsical and outsized Totoro.
The Kobal Collection/Tokuma Enterprises

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:44 pm

The revered Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, 72, announced this weekend at the Venice Film Festival that he's retiring from making full-length feature films. (He previously went into "semi-retirement" after directing Princess Mononoke in 1997.)

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Exhumations Begin At Now-Closed Florida Reform School

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:04 pm

Researchers have begun exhuming remains from unmarked graves at a now-closed Florida reform school. Former residents of the school say brutal beatings were routine, and they believe many boys died as a result. At least 50 grave sites have been identified, and it is believed that there may be many more. Several families of boys who died there are demanding answers.

Around the Nation
4:24 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

California Lawmakers Target Boy Scouts' Tax-Exempt Status

Boy Scouts attend a Memorial Day event in Los Angeles in May. A bill under consideration by the California Legislature would take away the tax-exempt status of the Boy Scouts of America.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 7:44 pm

Beginning next year, the Boy Scouts of America will allow openly gay youth to join as members. But the policy change doesn't go far enough for Democratic lawmakers in California. They're on the verge of passing a bill that would strip tax breaks for the Boy Scouts and any other group that discriminates against gay, lesbian or transgender members.

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Business
4:23 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

New Carpet Factories Help Cushion Blows From Recession Losses

Fibers are rolled into spools at the Engineered Floors carpet plant in Dalton, Ga.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

Known as the "Carpet Capital of the World," Dalton, Ga., has struggled and lost 17,000 manufacturing jobs over the past decade.

But now, Engineered Floors is investing $450 million in two new manufacturing facilities and a distribution center in the area. The Dalton expansion is part of a resurgence in manufacturing in Georgia and it reflects an optimistic outlook for manufacturing across the Southeast.

Something Different, Something New

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NPR Story
4:23 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Jersey Shore Feels Summertime Blues After Sandy

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:04 pm

Labor Day weekend marks the close of the official summer season on the Jersey Shore. But for some towns, it's like the summer never really began. Destruction from Hurricane Sandy last October kept tourists away. Some towns are still struggling to rebuild. Businesses that rely on seasonal visitors for much of their yearly take are wondering if they'll be around next year.

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