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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Immigration Is Driving Broad Demographic Shifts In U.S., Report Says

Navy Petty Officer Jimmy Dial (left) sits with his daughter, Kimberly, beside U.S. Army soldier Henri Blandon and his daughter as the men's wives and the girls' mothers become U.S. citizens at a naturalization ceremony last month in Ontario, Calif.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 7:38 pm

Native-born Americans are making up a smaller percentage of those living in some areas of the U.S. as immigration moves to become the key factor in population growth within the next quarter-century, according to a new analysis by the Pew Charitable Trusts that examined county-level census data.

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Goats and Soda
3:56 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

And The Award For Most Offensive Fundraising Video Goes To ...

The "Rusty Radiator" award for most offensive or stereotypical portrayal of the developing world in a fundraising video went to Feed a Child South Africa.
Feed a Child South Africa

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 2:34 pm

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The Two-Way
3:54 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

5 Defining Moments In The U.S.-Cuba Relationship

Obama shakes hands with Castro during a memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela in Soweto, South Africa, on Dec. 10, 2013. Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro says his brother introduced himself to Obama in English, telling him, "Mr. President, I'm Castro," as the two leaders shook hands.
AP

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 7:32 pm

1. Obama, Raul Castro Announce Normalization Of Relations

President Obama said Wednesday the U.S. and Cuba will normalize relations, which have been strained since being severed in 1961. He spoke to Cuban President Raul Castro on Tuesday to finalize details of the announcement.

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Television
3:24 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

A Tribute To Stephen Colbert, A Self-Proclaimed 'Junkie For Exhaustion'

Stephen Colbert will host his final episode of The Colbert Report Thursday after nine years on air.
Pool Getty Images

After nine years, Stephen Colbert is retiring the character he created for The Colbert Report, the conservative, self-important blowhard who opines about the news and the media. The final episode airs Thursday. Colbert will take over as host for The Late Show, replacing the retiring David Letterman.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

America's Political Dynasties

Republican Jeb Bush (left) has announced he's exploring a run for president. Hillary Clinton (right) is widely expected to pursue the Democratic nomination in 2016. (Saul Loeb, Mike Coppola/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s something to think about. Americans under the age of 38 have only experienced one presidential election that did not involve a Bush or a Clinton, and that was in 2012.

Now there is at least a possibility of another presidential election that features two members of political dynasties. Jeb Bush is actively pursuing a run for the Republican nomination and it’s expected that Hillary Clinton will chase the Democratic nomination.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

FIFA Ethics Investigator Resigns In Protest

FIFA ethics prosecutor Michael Garcia delivers a speech during the 64th FIFA congress on June 11, 2014 in Sao Paulo, on the eve of the opening match of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

Michael Garcia, the ethics investigator behind the FIFA report looking into the bidding process to host the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, has quit in protest over the handling of the report.

The 430-page corruption report is being kept confidential by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Garcia wants it to be made public.

Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca discusses Garcia’s resignation and the FIFA corruption report with host Robin Young.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Say Goodbye To 'Stephen Colbert' And Hello To Stephen Colbert

Stephen Colbert is signing off after 10 seasons behind the C-shaped desk of “The Colbert Report.” He’s going out with some symbolism, going head-to-head with his final guest, Grimmy the Grim Reaper.

The Comedy Central funny guy is moving on to a new post, taking over for David Letterman on CBS’s “The Late Show.” The satirical conservative pundit he played on Comedy Central will soon be a thing of the past.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Cheryl Strayed And Steve Almond Pair Up For 'Dear Sugar' Podcast

Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed are hosts of the new podcast "Dear Sugar Radio."

The new WBUR podcast “Dear Sugar Radio” teams up authors Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed. The pair take on the concerns of listeners, though it’s not exactly the podcast version of an advice column.

As Almond told Here & Now’s Robin Young, the people who write in “don’t want an answer, they want permission essentially to feel what they’re feeling and to know that they’re in a process of struggle and they’re not alone in that.”

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Anger, Worry In Hollywood As Sony Cancels 'The Interview'

A poster for the movie "The Interview" is taken down by a worker from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, in Atlanta. (David Goldman/AP)

“Disgraceful,” “un-American act of cowardice” and “sad day for creative expression” are among the responses in Hollywood to the news that Sony Pictures has pulled “The Interview” from its scheduled release.

Sony says its decision comes after a majority of theaters canceled planned showings, adding: “We respect and understand our partners’ decision and, of course, completely share their paramount interest in the safety of employees and theater-goers.”

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Reconciliation Nonprofit Helped With U.S.-Cuban Relations

People stand outside the Little Havana restaurant Versailles after news that U.S. contractor Alan Gross was released from a Cuban prison and U.S. President Barack Obama's announcement on United States-Cuba policy change on December 17, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Obama announced plans to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba, over 50 years after they were severed in January 1961. In a prisoner exchange, U.S. contractor Alan Gross was freed after being held in Cuba since 2009, with three Cuban spies who had been imprisoned in the U.S. since 2001 going back to Cuba. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 3:19 pm

Many things went into this week’s announcement of a reconciliation of sorts between the U.S. and Cuban governments, including input from a conflict resolution nonprofit in Cambridge, Mass.

Beyond Conflict has worked around the globe, including in Northern Ireland, South Africa and El Salvador, to try to get adversaries to sit down and try to find a way to rapprochement.

For the past four years, Beyond Conflict has enlisted leaders from those areas to travel to Miami and Cuba to try to pave the way towards a future reconciliation.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

College Counselor: 'A Deferral Is Not A Denial'

Originally published on Sat December 20, 2014 11:52 am

High school students discovered this week whether they’ve been accepted to their choice college under early decision. For students who were deferred, guidance counselor Lisa Micele says that doesn’t mean they won’t get in to their top school in the spring.

Micele is the director of college counseling at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois. She spoke with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson and shared some tips about navigating the college application process.

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Are Artificial Christmas Trees Really More Environmentally Sound?

Tree farms provide the majority of Christmas trees. (jpmatth/Flickr)

Three million American families will buy real Christmas trees this year. Most are grown in either Oregon or North Carolina, the top two Christmas-tree-producing states in the country.

However, the real-tree industry has something in common with many other businesses: competition with China. About 79 percent of people now use artificial Christmas trees.

One reason people purchase artificial trees is because they believe they’re more environmentally sound. But is that true?

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NPR Story
2:53 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

Putin Vows To Fix Russian Economy

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during his annual press conference in Moscow on December 18, 2014. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images)

In his annual press conference, which ran four hours, Russian President Vladimir Putin promised to ease the country’s economic woes by diversifying its heavy reliance on oil and gas. He also said he’s confident the plummeting ruble will recover.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

A Short History Of U.S.-Cuba Relations

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter (left) shakes hands with Cuban President Fidel Castro on May 12,, 2002, at the State Council in Havana, where Castro, Carter and their respective delegations met for a working meeting. Carter was on a five-day visit to Cuba, invited by Castro. (Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images)

President Obama’s decision to change U.S. policy on Cuba comes after a half century of icy relations. The announcement came as a surprise to many, including Julia Sweig, director for Latin American studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Sweig joined Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the history of the struggle between the two nations and outline what the opening of diplomatic relations and easing of restrictions will mean both for Cuba and the United States.

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Shots - Health News
2:43 pm
Thu December 18, 2014

NIH Allows Restart Of MERS Research That Had Been Questioned

A transmission electron micrograph shows Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus particles (colorized yellow).
NIAID

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 3:26 pm

Some researchers who study the virus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome got an early Christmas present: permission to resume experiments that the federal government abruptly halted in October.

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