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National Security
4:36 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Why A Young Minneapolis Man Wanted To Join ISIS

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Technology
4:36 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

FCC Approves New Rules Intended To Protect Open Internet

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Federal Communications Commission voted today to regulate Internet access more like a public utility, the vote split 3-2 along party lines. As NPR's Joel Rose reports, the vote reflects deep divisions over the future of the Internet.

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Found Recipes
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Don't Be Fooled By The Fishy Ingredients: This Burger Is Delicious

Chef Marcus Samuelsson first fell in love with a version of this burger at a tiny fish shack in Barbados.
Paul Brissman Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Have you ever fallen in love with a sandwich? Maybe one where the mix of ingredients might otherwise say, "No, I am so wrong for you!" And yet ... it's delicious.

That once happened to chef Marcus Samuelsson in Barbados. He has a ritual whenever he travels to a new place — ask the cabdriver, "Where do you eat?" On that trip he ended up at a tiny fish shack called Cuz, named after its owner.

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Around the Nation
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Many Of Oregon's Coastal Schools, Hospitals And Fire Stations At Tsunami Risk

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Law
4:35 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Legalized Pot In D.C. A Symbolic Victory For Marijuana Advocates

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Salt
4:26 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Will The Dietary Guidelines Consider The Planet? The Fight Is On

A government-appointed panel concluded in a recent report that Americans should eat less red meat and processed meat. A more plant-focused diet is better for health and the environment, it found.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:40 pm

When it comes to eating well, we should consider the health of our bodies and the planet. This was the recommendation coming from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on Feb. 19.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

In Video: The Great Llama Drama Of 2015

A pair of llamas were on the run in Sun City, Ariz., for about an hour.
Fox 46 via YouTube

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:28 pm

A pair of llamas on the loose in Sun City, Ariz., riveted the nation this afternoon.

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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

South Korea Decriminalizes Cheating, Shares Of Contraceptive Companies Rise

Park Han-chul (center) president of South Korea's Constitutional Court, sits with other judges prior to the ruling on the country's adultery law Thursday in Seoul.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:59 pm

Extramarital sex is no longer a crime in South Korea, giving shares of contraceptive companies a boost.

On Thursday, South Korea's Constitutional Court struck down a decades-old law that made adultery a crime punishable by up to two years in prison.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn tell our Newscast unit that "roughly 100,000 people have been convicted of adultery since the law was passed in 1953, but conviction rates have recently fallen to below 1 percent."

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NPR Story
3:48 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Fearful Of ISIS, Saudis Continue To Fortify Border With Iraq

Saudi border guards monitor cameras and radars on surveillance screens of the Saudi northern border with Iraq at Arar regional command and control center headquarters in Arar city, on February 23, 2015. (Ian Timberlake/AFP/Getty Images)

Officials in Saudi Arabia estimate that more than 2,000 young men have joined up with the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS.

The Saudi Special Operations Forces, under the Ministry of the Interior, have begun large-scale exercises to protect the border between that country and Iraq, to the north. Officials also worry about Saudis returning home after fighting with ISIS and carrying out attacks.

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The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Banksy's Murals Turn Up In Gaza Strip

A mural is seen on the remains of a house that witnesses said was destroyed by Israeli shelling during a 50-day war last summer in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip.
Suhaib Salem Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 5:45 pm

Banksy's work is now in the Gaza Strip.

The artist, who uses public spaces for his often-provocative murals, posted images that he said were of art he created in the Gaza Strip, along with a two-minute video of life in the Palestinian territory, titled "Make this the year YOU discover a new destination."

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Saudi Man Convicted Of Conspiracy In 1998 U.S. Embassy Bombings

Khalid al-Fawwaz, a Saudi man who the U.S. says was Osama bin Laden's top lieutenant in Britain, has been convicted on all four conspiracy charges tied to the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

The AP reports that Al-Fawwaz's trial started a month ago in a fortified courthouse in New York. The trial focused on al-Qaida's early days. The AP adds:

"Al-Fawwaz stood expressionless as the verdict was read, pursing his lips briefly. He could face life in prison.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

FCC Overrides State Laws Blocking City-Owned Broadband Service

"Greenlight" high speed internet service is provided by the City of Wilson, N.C. (Leoneda Inge/WUNC)

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to override state laws blocking city-owned broadband companies from expanding and competing with commercial Internet providers.

At the center of this debate are communities like Wilson, North Carolina. The city, about 50 miles east of Raleigh, built its own broadband network before the state legislature prohibited cities from competing with private broadband providers.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Why Are Prices Falling As Wages Nudge Higher?

Saul Trana stands in the check-out line as he shops at a Walmart store on February 19, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Walmart company announced Thursday that it will raise the wages of its store employees to $10 per hour by next February, bringing pay hikes to an estimated 500,000 workers. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:28 pm

The Labor Department today reported that the Consumer Price Index, which measures how much Americans pay for various goods and services, fell in January from a year earlier, the first annual drop in five years. This comes as the economy is improving and wages are slowly growing. NPR’s Marilyn Geewax joins Here & Now’s to explain what’s happening.

Guest

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Girls Basketball Teams Suspended For Trying To Lose

The Riverdale High School and Smyrna High School girls basketball teams were suspended for both trying to lose the game on Feb. 21. (Screenshot from a video tweeted by Trevor Goodson @CousinTrevvv)

Two Tennessee high school girls basketball teams made news this week after playing so badly as to tip off the referee and the Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association that they were playing to lose. Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca joins host Meghna Chakrabarti with details.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Country Star Jennifer Nettles Hits The Broadway Stage In 'Chicago'

Jennifer Nettles behind the scenes of her photo shoot for her Broadway debut as Roxie Hart In 'Chicago' on December 10, 2014, in New York City. (Jenny Anderson/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:08 pm

The name on everybody’s lips is going to be Jennifer Nettles, as she stars in the Broadway musical “Chicago.”

Nettles, who is best known for the Grammy-winning country duo Sugarland, is playing the role of Roxie Hart, a murderess awaiting trial in 1920s jazz-age Chicago.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with the country star about her debut and the challenges of going from singer to Broadway actor.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

House Republicans Face Decision: Fund DHS Or Stand Firm On Immigration

Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) holds his weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 26, 2015 in Washington, D.C. With less than two days to go before the Department of Homeland Security shutdown, Boehner said that it is still up to the Senate to pass legislation to fund the Department of Homeland Security, adding 'We passed a bill to fund the department six weeks ago. Six weeks ago.' (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The Department of Homeland Security could run out of money by this Friday, Feb. 27, if the House and the Senate don’t vote for a funding extension before then.

The Senate has made noises like it has reached a deal; Democrats say they’ll vote for a Republican plan to vote separately on the Homeland Security funding and the president’s executive actions on immigration.

The Republican-controlled House has already passed a bill tying the two together. So will the House compromise and vote on a bill that matches up with the Senate?

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

How The Fight Over DHS Funding And Immigration Is Playing Among Latinos

Dian Alarcon, originally from Colombia, stands with others during a press conference to protest the district court judge in Brownsville, Texas, who issued a preliminary injunction that temporarily blocks the implementation process of President Barack Obama's Executive Action on immigration on February 17, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

With funding for the Department of Homeland Security set to run out on Friday, President Obama was in South Florida yesterday for a televised town hall-style meeting on immigration reform.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti talks to Enrique Acevedo, anchor and correspondent at Univision, about the issue that’s at the heart over this fight over funding DHS: the president’s executive actions on immigration. Acevedo also discusses how all of this is playing out among Latinos.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Pakistanis Must Get Fingerprinted To Use Cellphones

A Pakistani mobile vendor (center) deals with customers at his roadside stall in Rawalpindi on January 6, 2015. (Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:06 pm

All across Pakistan, cellphone users are lining up to get fingerprinted. The government has ordered cellphone companies to collect the biometric data for every SIM card — and it says it will cut off service for any phone not registered.

Tim Craig, the Islamabad bureau chief for The Washington Post, tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that the new program is a response to recent brutal terrorist attacks that have used cell phones.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Remote Mexican Villages Build Their Own Cell Networks

Peter Bloom of Rhizomatica meets with the authorities in Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca. Rhizomatica is a non-profit group in Oaxaca city that has helped 16 remote villages install and operate their own cell phone networks. (rhizomatica.org)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 3:17 pm

Cellphones are just about everywhere these days. But in remote, rural places the key ingredient – a cell network – is often missing. In the U.S., long-distance users pay a surcharge into the Universal Service Fund, which the government uses to pay network operators to provide affordable phone access in rural or low-income areas.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

That Political Bumper Sticker Could Cost You Your Job

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 10:17 am

‘Tis the season to speculate who’s going to run for president, who will make it through the primary, who will ultimately end up in Oval Office.

But before you slap a bumper sticker on your car, or hang a political cartoon at work, you might want to think twice. Because it turns out that either of those could get you fired. And in most states in the country, labor laws will not protect you.

While federal law bars employers from firing workers for race, religion or gender, there is no protection for freedom of political speech or action.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For A Glimpse At A GOP Presidential Hopeful, Head To CPAC

Volunteers walk by a stand at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, outside Washington, D.C. on February 26, 2015. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:03 pm

The Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC, usually attracts the country’s most die-hard conservative activists. This year it’s also attracting nearly a dozen – depending on how you count – Republican presidential hopefuls for 2016.

NPR’s Don Gonyea is there and joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about who’s at CPAC to show off their stuff, and how they might try to win hearts and minds.

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Shots - Health News
2:48 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

From Naked Mole Rats To Dog Testicles: A Writer Explores The Longevity Quest

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 4:03 pm

When journalist Bill Gifford turned 40, his friends gave him a cake shaped as a tombstone with the words, "R.I.P, My Youth." As he reflected on his creeping memory lapses and the weight he'd gained, Gifford got interested in the timeless quest to turn back the aging clock — or at least slow it down.

His latest book, Spring Chicken, explores everything from some wacky pseudo-cures for aging to fascinating research that point to causes of aging at the cellular level.

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Television
2:39 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Battle Creek' Has The Flavor Of A TV Throwback From An Earlier Age

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 4:28 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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The Salt
1:49 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Alaska Farmer Turns Icy Patch Of Tundra Into A Breadbasket

Tim Meyers on his four-acre vegetable farm in southwestern Alaska. Behind him: an endless sea of tundra, and a glimpse of the town of Bethel.
Eugenie Frerichs for NPR

The Alaskan tundra might not seem like much of an agricultural hotspot, but one farmer in the frigid town of Bethel believes he's found America's newest breadbasket.

For the last 10 years, Tim Meyers has been coaxing an enviable quantity of fruits and veggies from just four acres of land. Last year, he produced 50,000 pounds of potatoes, beets, carrots and other vegetables. He sells it at his year-round biweekly market and to local grocery stores.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Senate Panel OKs Loretta Lynch Nomination As Attorney General

Loretta Lynch, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Jan. 28. The panel voted Thursday to send her nomination to be U.S. attorney general to the full Senate.
Ron Sachs DPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 8:03 pm

Loretta Lynch, President Obama's nominee for attorney general, cleared a major hurdle Thursday to succeed Eric Holder as the country's top law enforcement officer. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 12-8 to send the nomination to the full chamber, which is expected to confirm her nomination.

Three Republicans joined the panel's Democrats to vote "yes." Those opposed to her nomination cited President Obama's executive actions on immigration.

"We should not confirm someone to that position who intends to continue that unlawful policy," said Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala.

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Astronomers Discover A Supermassive Black Hole Dating To Cosmic Dawn

A supermassive black hole, like the one illustrated here, has been discovered 12.8 billion light years away, at the center of an exceptionally bright quasar.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 5:15 pm

SDSS J0100+2802 is the rather understated name scientists have given to an exceptionally luminous, newly discovered quasar. It's 12.8 billion light years away and shines as brightly as 420 million suns. At its center, there's a super-sized black hole — as massive as 12 billion suns — that formed some 900 million years after the Big Bang.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Judge Throws Out Cover-Up Allegations Against Argentine President

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed allegations by prosecutors that Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, seen here Feb. 11, tried to cover up the alleged involvement of Iranian officials in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 8:38 pm

Last month, an Argentine prosecutor who was due to testify about an alleged cover-up in the investigation into the deadly 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires was found dead.

Alberto Nisman had accused President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner's government of covering up Iran's alleged role in the bombing that killed 85 people to push through a grains-for-oil deal with Tehran. After Nisman's death, the investigation was continued by prosecutor Gerardo Pollicita.

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The Two-Way
12:43 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Pew Study On Religion Finds Increased Harassment Of Jews

Boys in Uppsala, Sweden, read supportive messages placed at the entrance of a mosque following an attack in January. A new Pew study finds that religious intolerance is a global problem, with Muslims facing more hostility from individuals, and Christians from governments. Targeting of Jews, the study found, has gotten worse over in recent years.
Anders Wiklund AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Updated at 2 p.m. ET.

This week, a man was sentenced to die in Saudi Arabia because he renounced his faith in Islam; a Hindu leader in India made a new accusation against Mother Teresa; a mosque near Bethlehem was set on fire.

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It's All Politics
12:38 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

What We're Watching At The Conservative Political Action Conference

Ben Carson talks with media after his CPAC speech.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:48 pm

This week's Conservative Political Action Conference has drawn a huge crowd of activists and politicos, per usual — but it's also a prime spot for 2016 presidential hopefuls. The GOP's potential candidates — former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Gov. Scott Walker, Gov. Bobby Jindal — are rolling on and off the main stage, hoping to fire up the conservative audience. And how well they do with this crowd — an important part of their base — may say a lot about 2016. Here are five things I'll be watching for at CPAC:

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Economy
12:31 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Higher Wages, Lower Prices Give Consumers A Break

A sharp drop in gasoline prices led the consumer price index to fall in January. The CPI posted its first year-over-year drop since 2009.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 1:54 pm

Economists usually worry about a "wage-price spiral" taking hold. That's when workers are earning more, but losing buying power as prices rise.

For now, at least, something very rare is happening: Paychecks and prices are heading in opposite directions.

"You have a schism that's helpful to consumers," IHS economist Doug Handler said about the recent decline in prices and rise in wages.

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