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Saru Jayaraman may be restaurant obsessed, but don't call her a foodie. She's the founding director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, a national organization that advocates for better wages and working conditions for restaurant workers. She's also published several studies in legal and policy journals as director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California-Berkeley.

No games will be played, but tomorrow is still a big day for college football. As per National Signing Day tradition, the best 17 and 18-year-old high school players from around the country are set to officially announce which college they will play for.

Increasingly, the day, and the hype around it, have provided fodder to the critics who say college football is anything but amateur. To discuss the big day, college football analyst John Bacon joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

Just like that, the candidates have left Iowa in the rear-view mirror. After last night’s caucuses, the front-runners are off to New Hampshire, but not before leaving their supporters in the Hawkeye State with some parting words. Here & Now plays a sampling of the candidates’ speeches.

On the Republican side, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won the GOP caucuses with 28 percent of the vote. Donald Trump won 24 percent, and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio was just a single percentage point behind him.

The Winter Fancy Food Show was held recently in San Francisco. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst checked it out and tells host Jeremy Hobson that healthy snacks seem to be all the rage.

“Everybody tries to say ‘less fat, no gluten, no GMO, no junk’ – I mean these buzz words are all over these packaged foods,” she said.

Gunst sent Hobson a sampling of baked popcorn, lentil and cassava chips and even bugs flavored with chili and lime, and chocolate.

Alphabet, the parent company of Google, officially overtook Apple to become the most valuable publicly-traded company in the world, after shares opened nearly 3 percent higher.

The newly restructured company gave its first earnings report Monday, beating Wall Street’s expectations and revealing some detail about the figures for its core business and other moonshot ventures.

At the same time, Yahoo Inc. is expected to unveil major cuts, following its earnings report Tuesday afternoon.

With the Iowa caucuses over, the presidential candidates are racing to New Hampshire ahead of that state’s primary. Hillary Clinton squeaked past Bernie Sanders in the Democratic Party race, but the vote was a statistical tie. Ted Cruz won on the Republican side, with Donald Trump finishing second and Marco Rubio coming in a strong third.

The race also got a little smaller, with Democrat Martin O’Malley and Republican Mike Huckabee dropping out.

A new show debuts on FX tonight and NPR TV critic Eric Deggans thinks it could be one of the best new finds of 2016.

“The People vs. OJ Simpson” will be the first season of the new true crime TV series “American Crime Story.” The story is centered on the trial of the former NFL star who was accused of killing his wife and another man, and then acquitted.

The climate is changing in the Pacific Northwest, and the consequences are playing out in some surprising ways.

At Crater Lake National Park in Oregon, the surface water temperature of the country’s deepest lake is on the rise. An invasive crayfish species is loving the new warmer waters and that’s putting the lake’s clarity and native creatures in jeopardy.

Jes Burns of Oregon Public Broadcasting and the reporting collaborative EarthFix reports.

With the results of the Iowa caucuses in, candidates and the media are turning their eyes to New Hampshire ahead of the primaries there February 9th.

WBUR senior political correspondent Anthony Brooks is on the campaign trail in New Hampshire, and joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the moves the candidates are likely to make in the coming days.

A flurry of quarterly earnings reports came in today, including those of Exxon, where profits fell more than 58 percent in the fourth quarter, and BP, where profits went down 91 percent in the same period.

As the Republicans move toward their convention in Cleveland this summer, it’s still anyone’s guess who the nominee will be. Things were even less clear over a century ago, when James A. Garfield emerged as the surprise choice at a brokered convention, back in 1880. Garfield won the White House, but his term was cut short by an assassin’s bullet.

A Michigan emergency manager tied to two major controversies has resigned from his current post running Detroit's public school district.

Darnell Earley has faced escalating criticism over poor conditions in Detroit schools. Before that, he ran the troubled city of Flint. As Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta reports:

"He carried out the now-infamous decision to use the Flint River as a temporary source of drinking water for the city. The untreated corrosive river water caused lead to leach from old pipes into the drinking water.

A few weeks ago, I ate three pieces of cake on a single day. All in the name of research, of course.

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A memo from congressional investigators sheds new light on the inner workings of Martin Shkreli's Turing Pharmaceuticals after the company jacked up the prices of a decades-old drug used to treat AIDS patients.

The House Committee on Oversight and Investigations is looking into Turing and other drug companies' price increases. This memo, released Tuesday, includes excerpts from the company's internal documents and emails.

Patients suffered no additional harm when doctors training to be surgeons were allowed to work longer shifts, a study published Tuesday concludes. The findings provide fresh evidence for medical educators looking to relax the strictest limits on resident hours.

BP Earnings Plunge 91 Percent In 4th Quarter

Feb 2, 2016

Global oil and gas price drops have shattered BP's profits.

The British energy giant said Tuesday that its fourth-quarter "underlying replacement cost profits" (or net income) dropped 91 percent. Profits fell to $196 million, compared with $2.2 billion in the year-ago quarter.

The full-year figures were somewhat less dramatic: 2015 profits amounted to $5.9 billion, down from $12.1 billion the previous year. That's a 51 percent drop.

Few States Use Health Law Option For Low-Cost Plans

Feb 2, 2016

In January, more than 350,000 New Yorkers began paying $20 a month or less for comprehensive health insurance with no deductibles and low copayments, for a type of coverage made possible by the federal health law. Minnesota has similar coverage in place through the same option, with more than 125,000 enrollees.

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Coin tosses, a squeaker of a win and, perhaps even more surprising, humility. That's what marked Monday night's Iowa caucuses, the first votes cast in the 2016 presidential election.

The presidential candidates are now focused on New Hampshire, where polls put Bernie Sanders ahead of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ahead of Ted Cruz, the Union Leader reports. The New Hampshire primaries will be held next Tuesday, Feb. 9.

Here's a roundup of headlines from the morning after the Iowa campaign.

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A crowd gathered at Gobbler's Knob early this morning, awaiting the emergence of the groundhog named Punxsutawney Phil. After a tap of a cane on Phil's tree-trunk cage, his door was opened, and the animal emerged.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. Here's what Donald Trump might be thinking this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROLLING IN THE DEEP")

ADELE: (Singing) We could have had it all.

Police have arrested three teenagers — ages 13, 16, and 17 — who are believed to have carried out last week's deadly attack on a homeless camp in Seattle known as "The Jungle." Two people were killed in the shooting; three more were hospitalized.

Last week, the authorities said they believed the victims were targeted; today, the AP reports that the police think the crime "stemmed from a drug-dealing dispute."

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Iowa has once again proved its perennial resistance to political inevitability and the power of personality.

In this year's iteration of the Iowa caucuses, national polling leaders Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton had their campaign momentum slowed in significant ways by party activists who preferred their rivals.

A big win in Iowa might have set either leader on the path to a relatively easy nomination. But that was not to be, and now both Trump and Clinton face difficult and perhaps protracted struggles to overcome rivals they had hoped to dismiss.

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