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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Study: Social Media Doesn't Stress People Out; People Stress People Out

A new study out from Pew Research Center found that use of social media platforms like Facebook, Tumblr and Twitter is not linked to stress and anxiety in users.

This contradicts the long held fear that digital connectivity can take over people’s lives, creating time and social pressures that heighten risks for stress.

However, the study did find that increased awareness of stressful events in the lives of others can, in fact, increase your own stress levels. In other words, stress is contagious.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Obama Gives Ebola Doctor Prime Seat At State Of The Union

Dr. Pranav Shetty (left) has been at the center of the Ebola fight in Africa. (Stuart J. Sia/International Medical Corps)

When President Obama stands before Congress to give his annual State of the Union address tonight (9 p.m. Eastern), about two dozen guests will watch the speech from the enviable vantage point of the First Lady’s box.

The guest list includes an American war veteran who lost both of his legs in Afghanistan; a 13-year-old from Chicago who wrote a letter to Santa Claus this Christmas asking for safety; and Alan Gross, the former American prisoner in Cuba, whose release played a part in the recent thaw in relations between the Unites States and Cuba.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

'The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore': A Critic’s Look

Host Larry Wilmore, hip-hop artist/activist Talib Kweli and comedian Bill Burr appear on the debut episode of Comedy Central's "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore" at The Nightly Show Studios on January 19, 2015 in New York City. (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for Comedy Central)

Last night, “The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore” premiered on Comedy Central in the 11:30 p.m. time slot made famous by “The Colbert Report” with Stephen Colbert.

Larry Wilmore’s new show premiered on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and dove right into conversations on race, including Oscar snubs for African-Americans actors, and the state of the black protest with a panel including New Jersey Senator Cory Booker and hip hop artist Talib Kweli.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Newspaper Editors Preview State Of The Union Speech

President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on January 28, 2014 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Three newspaper editors join Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young to discuss the ideas President Obama will lay out in his sixth State of the Union address tonight at 9 p.m. Eastern.

In Florida, South Florida Sun-Sentinel editor Rosemary Goudreau-O’Hara says there’s a roiling debate over Obama’s Cuba policy, as well as business community frustration with Affordable Care Act regulations.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Birmingham Mayor: 'No-Go' Zone Label Is 'Totally Unfair'

Councillor Shafique Shah is Lord Mayor of Birmingham, England. (birmingham.gov.uk)

Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal is standing by comments he made to CNN about so-called “no-go” zones in European cities, and the accusation that Muslims immigrating to Western countries refuse to assimilate.

Jindal’s comments came just after Fox News retracted similar comments that pundit Steven Emerson made on air, saying: “In Britain it’s not just no go zones, there are actual cities like Birmingham that are totally Muslim where non-Muslims just simply don’t go in.”

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

China's Economy Grows At Slowest Rate In 24 Years

A Chinese customer rests as he stands in a store in a shopping district on January 20, 2014 in central Beijing, China. China's economy is still growing, but at its weakest rate in 24 years. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

On Tuesday, new data from the National Bureau of Statistics of China reported that the economy expanded at an annual rate of 7.3 percent in the last quarter of 2014.

Most countries would welcome growth like that, but for China it represents a slowdown. In fact, according to the new data, China grew at its slowest rate in 24 years last year.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal discusses the details of the downturn with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

New NCAA Policy Hands Over Some Power

NCAA President Mark Emmert speaks with reporters during a news conference at the NCAA Convention in Oxon Hill, Md., Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. (Cliff Owen/AP)

The organization that governs college sports is allowing five major athletic conferences to make some of their own rules. It’s a major change for an association that’s not known for change.

The conferences approved a new policy at the recent NCAA Convention, which will allow those conferences to fully fund athletic scholarships, because right now those scholarships do not really cover the full cost of attending college.

The NCAA also allowed athletes to participate in the convention for the first time.

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NPR Story
3:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Moroccan-Dutch Novelist On Growing Up Muslim In Europe

Moroccan-Dutch novelist Abdelkader Benali, pictured here in 2011, recently wrote a New York Times op-ed about the anger of Europe's young marginalized Muslims. (Matěj Baťha/Wikimedia Commons)

The Charlie Hebdo attacks turned a spotlight on a part of France tourists don’t often see: the suburbs or banlieues that ring Paris, many of which are home to high concentrations of young Muslims.

After the attacks, an association representing 120 French mayors issued a statement warning that the economic disparities these young Muslims face must be addressed. Young Muslims were quoted saying they feel like they live in another country, and want to be regarded as truly French.

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The Two-Way
3:30 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Supreme Court Rules For Muslim Inmate In Prison Beard Case

This undated photo provided by the Arkansas Department of Correction shows prison inmate Gregory Holt.
AP

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 1:22 pm

In a closely watched religious rights case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Tuesday that an Arkansas prisoner must be allowed to grow a half-inch beard in accordance with his religion.

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Monkey See
3:24 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

An Uneven But Auspicious 'Nightly' Opener

Larry Wilmore brought The Nightly Show to Comedy Central on Monday night.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images for Comedy Central

It's perhaps not surprising that the strongest part of The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore on its debut Monday was the part that looked the most like The Daily Show and The Colbert Report, with which it shares considerable DNA. Wilmore opened with an observation that the Oscar nominations are "so white a grand jury decided not to indict them," acknowledged Selma and said the words "Eric Garner" and "Ferguson" in the teaser before the show open even rolled. (What was on Colbert's show the "pre-eagle" moment.)

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It's All Politics
3:16 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Obama Joins Ike, The Gipper, Bill And George II In A Club No One Wants To Be In

President Dwight Eisenhower delivers his State of the Union address before a joint session of the 86th Congress in 1959. Behind him are Vice President Richard Nixon (left) and Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn.
AP

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 7:06 pm

President Obama begins his seventh year in office Tuesday facing a Congress where both the House and Senate are in the hands of the opposition party. He shares this in common with every other president fortunate enough to even have a seventh year in office since the 1950s.

Dwight Eisenhower in 1959, Ronald Reagan in 1987, Bill Clinton in 1999 and George W. Bush in 2007 all climbed the rostrum for this late-in-the-game challenge looking out at majorities of the other party in both chambers.

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The Two-Way
2:31 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Pope Francis Says Catholics Don't Need To Breed 'Like Rabbits'

Pope Francis waves to the crowd in Manila, capital of the Philippines, before boarding his flight back to Rome on Monday.
Aaron Favila AP

On his return trip from Asia, Pope Francis made strong statements supporting the church's ban on artificial means of birth control. He also said Catholics should practice "responsible parenthood" and don't have to breed "like rabbits."

Speaking with reporters on a flight Monday from the Philippines to Rome, Francis encouraged the use of church-approved contraception.

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Author Interviews
2:02 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

In 'The Evil Hours,' A Journalist Shares His Struggle With PTSD

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 5:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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Television
2:02 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

'The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore' Debuts In Slot Vacated By Stephen Colbert

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Fallen Soldier’s Story Continues To Inspire

Sgt. 1st Class Jared C. Monti was killed in Afghanistan in 2006 and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor in 2009. (U.S. Army)

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 3:31 pm

After Jared Monti was killed in Afghanistan in 2006, his father Paul Monti started driving his son’s old truck.

When a songwriter in Nashville heard Paul talking about that on Here & Now, she co-wrote a song that eventually won Song of the Year at the Country Music Awards.

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The Two-Way
1:23 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

4 Linked To Paris Attack Appear In French Court

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:14 pm

There have been developments today in France and elsewhere in Europe over the investigation into the Jan. 7 attacks in Paris that left 17 people dead.

Four men accused of providing logistical support to Ahmed Coulibaly, the gunman who took hostages at a kosher supermarket during the Paris attacks, appeared in court today. It's not clear whether the four — all in the 20s — were aware of his plans.

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Shots - Health News
1:13 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

The City Might Not Be To Blame For High Asthma Rates

Dr. Stephen Teach helps Jeffery Ulmer listen to his daughter Alauna's asthmatic breathing at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Alauna's mother, Farisa, holds her. The District has one of the highest rates of pediatric asthma in the country.
Jahi Chikwendiu Washington Post

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 4:15 pm

Asthma affects children regardless of where they live and whether they are rich or poor. But scientists have long thought that living in poor urban neighborhoods adds an extra risk for this troublesome lung inflammation. A new study suggests that's not necessarily the case.

Asthma is often triggered by something in the environment, so in the 1960s, scientists started looking for places where asthma was especially bad.

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The Salt
12:48 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

How Your Food Gets The 'Non-GMO' Label

Demand is growing for GMO-free labels on food products, according to the Non-GMO Project, one of the principal suppliers of the label.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:41 pm

Demand for products that don't contain genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, is exploding.

Now many food companies are seeking certification for products that don't have any genetically modified ingredients, and not just the brands popular in the health food aisle. Even Cheerios, that iconic cereal from General Mills, no longer contains GMOs.

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Shots - Health News
12:17 pm
Tue January 20, 2015

Malpractice Changes In Massachusetts Offer Injured Patients New Options

When a woman had gallbladder surgery at a Massachusetts hospital in 2013, doctors noticed something suspicious on a CT scan that they thought could be ovarian cancer. But the recommendation that she get a pelvic ultrasound fell through the cracks. Months later, she was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Traces Of Oil Found In Montana Town's Water Supply After Spill

A warning sign shows the location of a 12-inch oil pipeline owned by Bridger Pipeline Co. that spilled up to 50,000 gallons of crude along the Yellowstone River near Glendive, Mont.
Matthew Brown AP

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:13 pm

Officials in Montana say they have detected traces of oil in the water supply of the town of Glendive, days after up to 50,000 gallons of oil spilled from a break in a pipeline along the Yellowstone River.

NPR's Kirk Siegler is reporting on the story for our Newscast unit. He says:

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Shiite Rebels Shell Yemeni Leader's House, Seize Presidential Palace

Houses of local residents are seen damaged in clashes that erupted between presidential guards and Shiite Houthi fighters in Sanaa, Yemen, on Tuesday.
Hani Ali Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:07 pm

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET

The Yemeni president's house is being shelled by Shiite rebels, and the presidential palace reportedly has been seized.

Nadia al-Saqqaf, the information minister, said on Twitter that President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi's house was being shelled by Shiite rebels whom Saqqaf called "militias seeking to overthrow the ruling system."

She said Hadi's home has been under attack since 3 p.m.

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Author Interviews
10:09 am
Tue January 20, 2015

'Gateway To Freedom': Heroes, Danger And Loss On The Underground Railroad

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 11:35 am

Until 2007, when it was unearthed by a Columbia University undergraduate, few scholars were aware of the record of fugitive slaves written by Sydney Howard Gay. Gay was a key Underground Railroad operative from the mid-1840s until the eve of the Civil War. He was also the editor of the weekly newspaper the National Anti-Slavery Standard.

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It's All Politics
9:53 am
Tue January 20, 2015

The State Of The Union Is ... 'Free And Restless'?

During his 1965 State of the Union address, President Lyndon Johnson said, "This, then, is the state of the union: free and restless, growing and full of hope."
AP

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 1:30 pm

Presidents often characterize the state of the union as "strong." Last year, in fact, President Obama remarked: "It is you, our citizens, who make the state of our union strong."

It seems whatever the crisis du jour is, the State of the Union address is a chance for the president to sneak in some optimism. In 2012, as the economy limped back, Obama still found occasion for the s-word: "The state of our union is getting stronger. And we've come too far to turn back now."

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The Two-Way
9:38 am
Tue January 20, 2015

White House Seeks More Time From Congress On Iran

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:41 pm

The White House says it could consider congressional action against Iran later in the year, but emphasized it wants more time to see if negotiations over the Islamic republic's nuclear program can work.

"If Congress wants to act later in the year, we could consider that, but at the moment they ought to give us the space to let these negotiations work," Denis McDonough, White House chief of staff, tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Jury Selection To Start In Aurora, Colo., Mass Shooting Trial

A view of the jury box, right, inside Courtroom 201, where jury selection in the trial of Aurora movie theater shootings defendant James Holmes is to begin Tuesday at the Arapahoe County District Court in Centennial, Colo.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 2:18 pm

Jury selection starts today in the trial of James Holmes, the man accused of killing 12 people and wounding 70 others in the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting in July 2012.

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NPR History Dept.
8:00 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Beware Of Japanese Balloon Bombs

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 1:21 pm

Those who forget the past are liable to trip over it.

Just a few months ago a couple of forestry workers in Lumby, British Columbia — about 250 miles north of the U.S. border — happened upon a 70-year-old Japanese balloon bomb.

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Middle East
7:58 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Why Was Iran's President Riding The Subway?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Islamic State, In Video, Threatens To Kill 2 Japanese Hostages

A photo from a video clip posted on YouTube shows a man with a knife threatening two captives identified as Haruna Yukawa (right) and Kenji Goto Jogo. The Islamic State says it wants $200 million for their release.
Kyodo /Landov

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 12:12 pm

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

The group that calls itself the Islamic State, in a direct address to Japan's prime minister, is threatening to kill two Japanese hostages unless it gets $200 million within 72 hours. The demand in a video posted online comes as Shinzo Abe is visiting the Middle East.

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Asia
7:31 am
Tue January 20, 2015

Chinese Prisoners Inovate How To Get Out Of Jail

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 7:58 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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