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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Goodbye, Garden Yeti: In-Flight Catalog SkyMall Files For Bankruptcy

A signature SkyMall item: The hot dog bun toaster.
SkyMall

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 2:43 pm

SkyMall, the ubiquitous in-flight catalog that reliably greets you in the seatback pocket, is falling victim to technological innovation.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:29 am
Fri January 23, 2015

The Ethics Of The 'Singularity'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:31 am

Some people argue that we will one day reach a point when our machines, which will have become smarter than us, will be able themselves to make machines that are smarter than them. Superintelligence — an intelligence far-outreaching what we are in a position even to imagine — will come on the scene. We will have attained what is known, in futurist circles, as the "singularity." The singularity is coming. So some people say.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Argentine President Now Says Prosecutor's Death 'Not A Suicide'

Alberto Nisman, the prosecutor investigating the 1994 bombing of the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association community center, talks to journalists in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 2013. Nisman was found shot dead in his apartment on Sunday.
Natacha Pisarenko AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 4:41 pm

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez has done an about-face on her initial statements that prosecutor Alberto Nisman's death earlier this week was suicide.

Nisman, 51, had been investigating an alleged government cover-up of Iran's suspected role in the 1994 bombing of the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association community center in Buenos Aires that killed 85 people.

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Goats and Soda
10:25 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Dear World: Bill And Melinda Gates Have 'Big Bets' For 2030

Cellphones are everywhere in the developing world, as this Nairobi street scene shows. Bill and Melinda Gates believe the phones can be used for everything from farmer education to instant banking.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:19 pm

Each year for the past six years, Bill and Melinda Gates have written a letter about how their foundation is trying to make the world a better place, how they're trying to improve health and education and end poverty. Their 2015 letter was published Wednesday on the foundation's blog. (Note: The Gates Foundation is a supporter of NPR.)

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Fri January 23, 2015

TSA Agents Discovered 2,212 Guns At Airport Checkpoints In 2014

TSA agents, like this one at Chicago's Midway International Airport, discovered more than 2,000 firearms at the nation's airports last year — the overwhelming majority of them loaded, according to new data.
Nam Y. Huh AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 4:08 pm

The Transportation Security Administration found more than 2,000 firearms at the nation's airports last year — the overwhelming majority of them loaded, the Department of Homeland Security said today.

TSA agents discovered 2,212 firearms — or a little more than six a day — in carry-on bags; 83 percent of them were loaded, the department said.

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It's All Politics
10:06 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Senate Says Climate Change Real, But Not Really Our Fault

Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., was the only senator to vote against an amendment calling climate change "real and not a hoax."
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 2:20 pm

Breathtakingly broad as its jurisdiction may be, the U.S. Senate does not usually vote on the validity of scientific theories.

This week, it did. And science won. The Senate voted that climate change is real, and not a hoax. The vote was 98-1.

The vote was about an amendment to the bill approving the Keystone XL pipeline. The near-unanimity of the climate change judgment was notable, because so many senators have cast doubt on ideas of "global warming."

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Yemeni Rebels Call For Mass Rallies After President Steps Down

Houthi Shiite Yemeni carry coffins of fellow men killed during recent clashes with presidential guard forces, during their funeral procession in Sanaa, Yemen, on Friday.
Hani Mohammed AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 4:44 pm

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Yemen's Houthi rebels, who have controlled the capital, Sanaa, for months, are staging mass rallies there today in the wake of the resignation of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi and his Cabinet.

Hadi on Thursday "succumbed to an apparent coup attempt" by the rebels, The Washington Post says.

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Monkey See
9:32 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Broad City' And Required Reading

NPR

On this week's Pop Culture Happy Hour, we're joined from Boston by PCHH's official enthusiastic librarian, Margaret Willison. We begin with a conversation about Broad City, the Comedy Central show that recently kicked off its second season (you can see the event Stephen talks about right here). We talk about some of the show's influences, some of what makes it special, and some of the ways it pushes against the boundaries of typical television.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Thai Lawmakers Vote To Impeach Ousted Premier

Thailand's former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, arrives at parliament in Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, to face an impeachment vote.
Sakchai Lalit AP

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 1:23 pm

Thai legislators installed by the country's military junta have voted to impeach ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra on charges of criminal negligence related to her government's failed effort to prop up the price of rice.

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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Top Stories: Saudi King's Death; Japanese Hostages' Fate Unknown

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:43 am

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The Two-Way
8:13 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Fate Of Japanese Hostages Unclear After Islamic State's Deadline Lapses

Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says the government is working to secure the release of Haruna Yukawa and Kenji Goto. A deadline imposed by the so-called Islamic State for the men's release has lapsed.
Koji Sasahara AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:23 pm

The fate of two Japanese hostages threatened with death by the self-styled Islamic State is unclear after the expiration of a 72-hour deadline imposed by the militants for Japan to pay $200 million to secure its citizens' release.

The Associated Press and Japanese news organizations are reporting that the militants posted a video today with a warning that "the countdown has begun." The AP adds: "The posting which appeared Friday shows a clock counting down to zero along with gruesome images of other hostages who have been beheaded by the Islamic State group."

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Europe
7:41 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Soccer Player Suspended For Making Calls During Match

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Television
7:06 am
Fri January 23, 2015

What Is ... 'Morning Edition'?

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 11:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
7:05 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Saudi King Abdullah Leaves Behind A Complex Legacy

Saudi King Abdullah, seen here last November, died early Friday. NPR's Kelly McEvers says he was a man who laid the foundation for reform in the conservative Arab country.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:14 pm

Saudis are mourning the passing of King Abdullah, who died early Friday at the age of 90 after a long illness.

As NPR's Kelly McEvers reported, he is being remembered as a man who laid the foundation for reform in the conservative Arab country. Dignitaries from around the world, including Vice President Joe Biden, will gather today in Saudi Arabia for Abdullah's funeral. Several Arab countries have declared a day of mourning.

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Politics
5:13 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Republicans In Congress Need Strong Ideas, Ohio Governor Says

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Now, in his state of the union speech this week, President Obama said the nation was emerging from crisis at home and abroad. And the crisis is certainly easing in Ohio, where Republican John Kasich is the governor.

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Politics
5:11 am
Fri January 23, 2015

House Approves Measure That Would Bar Federal Funding For Abortions

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Business
5:08 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Flexible Income Opportunity Helps Cities Warm To Uber, Study Says

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Research News
5:03 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Why NFL Teams Should Reconsider Giving Coaches The Heave-Ho

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Latin America
5:03 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Questions Over Prosecutor's Death Envelop Argentina

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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StoryCorps
5:03 am
Fri January 23, 2015

After Son's Death, Marine's Parents Grow Close To His Platoon

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
5:03 am
Fri January 23, 2015

Will 'Deflategate' Let The Air Out Of Super Bowl Hype?

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 8:14 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:37 am
Fri January 23, 2015

A Blind Woman Gains New Freedom, Click By Click By Click

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 5:20 pm

For someone who is blind, a simple click can be the sound of sight.

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The Two-Way
10:47 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

To Keep Planes From Disappearing, NTSB Urges Constant Tracking

One of many relatives who waited in vain for news of loved ones aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The NTSB hopes to get faster answers by requiring better technology, especially on planes that fly over large bodies of water.
Andy Wong AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 12:48 am

In a response to recent incidents in which large commercial airliners have vanished into oceans, the National Transportation Safety Board is calling for new regulations requiring all passenger planes that fly over large bodies of water to be equipped with more sophisticated flight tracking technologies.

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The Two-Way
9:44 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Former WWE Fighters Suing Over Alleged Brain Damage

WWE fighter Bray Wyatt, "The Eater Of Worlds," jumps on fighter "Dean Ambrose."
Courtesy of WWE

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 7:12 pm

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET on Jan. 23.

Two former World Wrestling Entertainment fighters are suing the company, alleging that it ignored signs of brain damage and injuries.

The lawsuit, dated Jan. 16, was filed by Vito "Big Vito" LoGrasso and Evan Singleton, who wrestled under the name "Adam Mercer."

The suit alleges that LoGrasso has sustained serious neurological damage as a result of wrestling. He says he has headaches, memory loss, depression and hearing impairment. Singleton also says he has tremors, convulsions and migraines.

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The Two-Way
9:20 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Ancient Egyptian Relic Broken, Repaired With Glue

The funeral mask of King Tutankhamun is seen during a 2011 tour for the press in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt. Officials say the mask's beard broke off last year, and was hastily glued back on.
Tara Todras-Whitehill AP

The gold and blue mask of King Tutankhamun, perhaps the most famous piece of Egyptian art in the world, has glue on its face.

Multiple sources are reporting that during a routine cleaning last year, Tutankhamun's long blue beard snapped off the mask. Curators rushed to fix it, and epoxyed the beard back on. But the fix was bad. The glue shows, and the mask is scratched.

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The Two-Way
9:16 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Goosebumps And Gas: New Data From Rosetta Probe Describes Comet

Close-ups of a curious surface texture on Comet 67P nicknamed "goosebumps," all of them at a scale of around 3 meters and spanning areas more than 100 meters.
ESA/Rosetta/MPS

Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, the hurtling hunk of dust and ice that's being tailed by an Earth-made space probe as it hurtles toward the sun,

We're learning more about the comet that a European Space Agency paired up with its Rosetta probe, thanks to a special issue of the journal Science that collects much of the information scientists have been able to glean from about the comet.

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All Tech Considered
8:01 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Police Departments Issuing Body Cameras Discover Drawbacks

A Philadelphia police officer demonstrates a body-worn camera being used as part of a pilot project last December.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 1:03 pm

Wearable video cameras are fast becoming standard-issue gear for American police. The cameras promise a technological answer to complaints about racial bias and excessive force.

But in fact, the beneficial effects of body cameras are not well-established yet. And the police departments that rushed to buy them are now dealing with some unintended consequences.

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The Two-Way
7:41 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

The Doomsday Clock Moves 2 Minutes Closer To Midnight

Professor Richard Somerville of the University of California in San Diego on Thursday unveils the "Doomsday Clock" showing a move toward disaster.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 10:01 am

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) has moved the Doomsday Clock two minutes closer to disaster. It now stands at three minutes before midnight.

The BAS was created in 1945 by the scientists who had participated in the Manhattan Project, developing the atomic bomb. They came up with the Doomsday Clock in 1947, after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, to alert the public to the dangers of nuclear proliferation. Midnight represents a global catastrophe.

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Parallels
7:40 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Saudi King Abdullah, Who Laid Foundation For Reform, Dies

Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud is seen in September 2011.
Ahmed Abdelrahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 23, 2015 12:46 pm

King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud of Saudi Arabia has died. He was 90 and had been hospitalized for a lung infection.

Abdullah was born before Saudi Arabia was even a country. It was the early 1920s, and his father, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud, set out to conquer the tribes of the Arabian Peninsula. In one famous battle, ibn Saud surrounded the capital of a rival tribe.

"Famously, instead of executing everybody, he invited them to be his guests," says Robert Lacey, author of two books on Saudi Arabia.

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The Two-Way
6:54 pm
Thu January 22, 2015

Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah Dies; Witnessed A New Era

Saudi state TV reported Friday Saudi King Abdullah died at the age of 90.
Brendan Smialowski AP

Originally published on Thu January 22, 2015 11:03 pm

Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah has died. The health of Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud had previously been the subject of rumors; word emerged earlier this month that he was indeed ill with a lung infection.

Abdullah was 90 years old. He ruled Saudi Arabia for nearly 10 years, having assumed the throne after his brother King Fahd died in 2005.

The kingdom's new ruler is King Salman, Abdullah's half-brother, according to state TV. Salman is reportedly 79.

The news has just emerged. We'll update this post as we learn new details.

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