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The Two-Way
7:15 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Book News: Battle Rages On In Amazon Vs. Overstock Price War

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:51 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:10 am
Fri August 2, 2013

U.S. Embassies To Close Sunday, And Possibly Beyond, For Safety

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:46 pm

Few details have emerged about the U.S. plan to shut down embassies that would normally be open this Sunday. A senior State Department official says that the U.S. facilities may be closed for more days, as well. The closures are being described as "precautionary steps" that are being taken "out of an abundance of caution."

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Around the Nation
6:55 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Post Office Pulls 'In Priority We Trust' Slogan

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now to an advertising campaign that was pulled even before it began. Our last word in business is: In Priority We Trust.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

That was the slogan the U.S. Postal Service was going to launch at the end of last month to highlight its priority mail products. Signs were sent out to post offices around the country. Apparently those words were intended to play off In God We Trust, which didn't sit well with some people.

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Around the Nation
6:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

D.C. Subway Baby Born At 'The Child' Station

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. As Shavonnte Taylor was riding the metro in D.C. yesterday, headed to a prenatal doctor's appointment. Her baby was due in a few weeks, but as she was changing trains her contractions began. Fellow metro riders, including luckily an EMT, sprang into action. And in a few minutes, right there on the platform, a healthy boy was born. Appropriately, that station is called L'Enfant Plaza. As in l'baby. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:41 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Colorado Restaurant Has A Furry New Regular

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

NPR Story
4:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Spoiler Alert: Spoilers May Not Be That Bad

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When you check social media and you're not caught up on your favorite TV show, say, you never know when you might encounter a spoiler. Somebody on Twitter, some blog says too much about what happened in a plot line. My big spoiler moment came when I saw a post about a death on "Downton Abbey" and I thought that everything was just ruined. But is it really that bad when this happens? NPR's Neda Ulaby has this encore story about how spoilers might actually make you enjoy something more.

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NPR Story
4:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Spanish Prime Minister Gets Grilled Over Bribery Claims

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Spain, efforts at economic recovery are being overshadowed by a bribery scandal. Top politicians have been accused of taking under-the-table cash from construction companies. The ruling party's former treasurer is in jail. And yesterday, the prime minister had to explain himself in parliament. Lauren Frayer reports from Madrid.

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NPR Story
4:42 am
Fri August 2, 2013

How Do Young Zimbabweans Feel About Their Future?

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Zimbabweans remember well that 2008 presidential election, when many in the opposition were rounded up, tortured, and scores were killed. Ultimately Robert Mugabe stayed in power - 33 years now and counting. Fungai Machirori, who's 29 years old, is part of a generation that grew up under Mugabe. She's a poet and the founder of Her Zimbabwe, a not-very-political platform for women to share their stories.

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StoryCorps
3:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

A Mother And Son Live, And Cope, With Mental Illness

Liza Long's son, 13, struggles with rage and violent outbursts. After the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., Long wrote a blog post advocating for better care for mentally ill youth.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

One day after the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., last December, Liza Long wrote a blog post urging the country to focus on treatment for the nation's mentally ill youth. In it, she shared the story of her own son, "Michael" (not his real name). "I live with a son who is mentally ill," she wrote for The Blue Review.

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The Salt
3:18 am
Fri August 2, 2013

Massachusetts Revives The Lost Art Of Making Sea Salt

The Martha's Vineyard beach where Heidi Feldman collects saltwater to make sea salt.
Courtesy of Heidi Feldman

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

"Look for a house, barn, paddock, barking dogs and screeching peacocks."

Those were Heidi Feldman's instructions to me to find Down Island Farm in Vineyard Haven on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

She forgot to mention the ram, free roaming chickens and miniature horse. But I managed to find it anyway.

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Planet Money
3:17 am
Fri August 2, 2013

4 Reasons Why Millions Of Americans Are Leaving The Workforce

NPR

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 11:08 am

The unemployment rate only includes people who don't have jobs and are looking for work. A much larger swath of people — about 36 percent of U.S. adults — don't have jobs and aren't looking for work at all. That figure is higher than it's been in decades (and, conversely, the share of adults in the labor force — shown in the graph above — is lower than it's been in decades).

Here are four reasons why so many people are leaving the labor force.

1. They're retiring.

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The Two-Way
6:51 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Hawaii Homeless Initiative Would Send Some Back To Mainland

A homeless man collects cans on Waikiki Beach in 2010 in Honolulu. Under a new pilot program, some homeless people will get help from the state to reunite with relatives on the mainland.
Marco Garcia AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 7:07 pm

A new homeless initiative in Hawaii is raising some eyebrows, and the department in charge of implementing it has concerns of its own.

As part of a larger housing bill in July, the state Legislature approved $100,000 per year for a three-year pilot project that would help get some homeless people off the island and back to their families on the mainland. Participants must leave voluntarily.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

3 Opinions On Whether Snowden Should Fight From Abroad

Edward Snowden's new refugee documents, which were shown by his lawyer.
Maxim Shemetov Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:57 am

Edward Snowden's father, Lonnie, had a dramatic change of heart this week: Back in June, he sent a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder in which he told him that if the U.S. promised not to detain or silence Edward before a trial, his son would be willing to return to the United States.

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Sports
6:01 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Glacier Helps U.S. Ski Team Drift Ahead Of Competition

Skiers Jessie Diggins (from left), Kikkan Randall and Sadie Bjornsen finish practice. During the summer, they ski on Eagle Glacier to prepare for competition. It's one of the few places where skiers can train on snow during the summer.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Radio Network

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 6:09 pm

The U.S. women's cross-country ski team has never won an Olympic medal. But that could change in Sochi, Russia, in February. The team has a secret weapon: a pristine glacier high above the mountains of Anchorage.

On the ground, it's summer. But as soon as the helicopter crests the mountain: winter. The snowy white Eagle Glacier stretches out for miles, rimmed by rocky peaks.

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Europe
5:23 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Cyclists Take Nighttime Ride Through Moscow's History

Cyclists honor Moscow's history while escaping the traffic during the annual Velonoch, or "Bike Night."
Mikhail Metzel AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 5:48 pm

Moscow is a city steeped in history — and clogged with traffic. It's among the world's most congested centers, renowned for erratic drivers and dangerous roads.

In an effort to appreciate the history and avoid the gridlock, cyclists have been getting together since 2007 for an annual late-night tour to explore the capital by bike.

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