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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Why Destroying Syria's Weapons May Be Tough, Despite Today's Deadline

The process of cataloging and destroying Syria's chemical weapons stockpile took another stride Sunday, as the country met a deadline for submitting a formal declaration of its chemical arsenal. Weapons experts must also complete their inspection of all 23 storage and production sites today.

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Possible Listeria Contamination Leads To Recalls In 25 States

Fears of possible listeria contamination are forcing grocery stores in 25 states to pull refrigerated foods from shelves. Taylor Farms of Jessup, Md., is recalling products that include salad kits with packets of dressing due to concerns of a possible contamination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

NPR's Jim Hawk filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Cardinals Get A Walk-Off World Series Win On Bizarre Play

Home plate umpire Dana DeMuth points to third base, where an obstruction call awarded the St. Louis Cardinals' Allen Craig home plate β€” and the winning run in Game 3 of the World Series β€” Saturday night. Boston Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia and Koji Uehara were dismayed by the call.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:27 pm

  • Hear Tom Goldman's Report On 'Weekend Edition'

Game 3 of the World Series ended in unusual fashion Saturday night, as a ninth-inning obstruction call on Boston third baseman Will Middlebrooks resulted in umpires awarding a base to St. Louis' Allen Craig β€” bringing the winning run home and putting the Cardinals ahead in the series, 2-1.

It's reportedly the first time an obstruction call has ended a World Series game. And it brought an end to a nearly four-hour contest in which the Red Sox had twice rallied from two-run deficits β€” most recently in the eighth inning.

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

A Ghost Story Between Brothers

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If the puzzle has your head spinning, how about a ghost story? Glynn Washington, host of the storytelling radio show "Snap Judgment," has a tale just in time for Halloween.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GLYNN WASHINGTON: OK. So it was one night in Detroit. I was five years old asleep in the bed right next to my brother. In the middle of the night, he woke me up and asked me: What's that? I looked up and staring down from the ceiling was a child's face.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Around the Nation
8:00 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Does A Bear Drive In The Woods?

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to a question you have probably never asked yourself: How do you get a bear out of a parked car? And more to the point, how does it get in there in the first place? In the Northern California town of Truckee, three different bears broke into three different cars over the past few weeks. It is a true story. Anne Bryant is the executive director of the Bear League in Tahoe, California. It's a not-for-profit volunteer group set up to help keep bears safe in the wild. She joins us now on the line. Hi, Anne.

ANNE BRYANT: Hi, Rachel.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Is Rebuilding Storm-Struck Coastlines Worth The Cost?

The Long Beach High School marching band prepares to march down the Long Beach boardwalk during a ribbon-cutting ceremony Friday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

One year ago Tuesday, Hurricane Sandy bore down on the East Coast, devastating shoreline communities from Florida to Maine.

Many of these areas have been rebuilt, including the Long Beach boardwalk, about 30 miles outside New York City. Officials held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new boardwalk Friday.

Ninety percent of the funding for the restoration came from the federal government. The Federal Emergency Management Agency paid $44 million to repair the devastation.

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Movie Interviews
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

Song For Childhood Ghosts 'Carries On' The Sorrow

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house she says was haunted. She even saw the ghosts of a mother and her son, she says.
Rik Keller Photography

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Weekend Edition has been asking you to share your scary stories, the ones that have become family lore. This week, we're sharing those stories and delving into how and why they affect us.

Singer-songwriter Rita Hosking grew up in a house that was haunted. It was known as the Old Erickson Place on Hatchet Mountain in California. In her 2009 album Come Sunrise, she tells the tragic story of the woman and her little boy who lived there years before.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun October 27, 2013

The Truth That Creeps Beneath Our Spooky Ghost Stories

We asked you to send us your scary stories, then we told them to an anthropologist.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 2:10 pm

Weekend Edition has been asking you to share your scary stories, the ones that have become family lore. This week, we're sharing those stories and delving into how and why they affect us.

As a teenager, Kevin Burns babysat for his sister's daughters β€” a 6-year-old and a 9-year-old. Throughout the night, he heard a baby crying, but it wasn't the kids, who were sound asleep in their beds.

Each time he investigated the crying, it stopped. When his sister and her husband came home, he asked them if their neighbor had a baby who cried loudly.

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Code Switch
6:01 am
Sun October 27, 2013

N.Y. Chinatown Family Finds Roots In Early Chinese Cinema

Harold Lee's son Henry, perched on the roof of a camera truck, helped produce and import Chinese-language films from Hong Kong and China in the late 1940s.
Courtesy of the Lee Family

Douglas Lee thought he knew just about everything about the family business.

Since the late 1930s, the Lee family has sold insurance at 31 Pell Street in New York City's Chinatown. Their entrepreneurial roots in the Chinese-American community stretch back to 1888, when the Lees opened a grocery store at the same location.

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The Salt
5:56 am
Sun October 27, 2013

A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 10:47 am

Trick-or-treaters demand it. Dentists despise it. Pop musicians have sung odes to it.

Love it or hate it, candy is a cultural fixation β€” and it isn't going anywhere.

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Music Interviews
7:05 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

For 'All Is Lost,' A Songwriter Embraces Silence

Alexander Ebert is best known for his band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, a folk band with a dozen members. His latest project is the score for All Is Lost, a film about one man lost at sea.
Stewart Cole Courtesy of the artist

Alexander Ebert may be best known as the singer and songwriter of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros β€” a band named for his messianic alter ego β€” which produced the addictive and catchy song "Home" in 2009.

He has also enjoyed a successful career as a solo artist since releasing his self-titled debut album in 2011.

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The New And The Next
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

A Teenage Music Phenom, Infographics, Motorcycles In Vietnam

Ozy co-founder Carlos Watson talks about a teen singer with a grown-up voice and Harleys in Vietnam.
Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 9:45 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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Law
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Lacking Lethal Injection Drugs, States Find Untested Backups

States across the country are facing a shortage of the drugs used for lethal injections. Some are going from a three-drug cocktail to a single drug.
Amber Hunt AP

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 7:32 pm

The U.S. is facing a shortage of a drug widely used for lethal injections. With few options, states are turning to new drugs and compounding pharmacies, rather than overseas companies.

The move is raising safety concerns, and in some cases delaying executions. Other executions are proceeding, however, and advocates are asking whether the use of new drugs violates the inmates' Eighth Amendment protection from cruel and unusual punishment.

A Witness To Lethal Injection

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Author Interviews
5:19 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Drawing Rock 'N' Roll And Sympathy Into Frankenstein's World

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 8:01 pm

Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein has been adapted countless times over the years β€” into films, television shows and even musicals.

In his new graphic novel adaptation of Shelley's story, illustrator Gris Grimly says he set out to make the original text more accessible.

"The first time I tried to read Frankenstein, I didn't get through it," Grimly tells NPR's Arun Rath. "Frankenstein is not the easiest read when you're young."

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Code Switch
5:12 pm
Sat October 26, 2013

Photographing Puerto Rican New York, With A 'Sympathetic Eye'

Miguel PiΓ±ero of the Nuyorican literary movement and poet Sandra Maria Esteves on the train in New York City in 1977.
Bolivar Arellano

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 9:31 pm

In the raging 1970s, New York City was dangerous, broke and at times on fire.

Latinos in the city were taking to the streets, running for office and carving out artistic spaces. "Latino" at the time in New York meant "Puerto Rican."

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