NPR News

Pages

Parallels
12:19 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

In Russia's Vast Far East, Timber Thieves Thrive

The Chinese border town of Suifenhe is a port of entry for almost all of the hardwood coming from the Russian Far East. Russia is the world's largest exporter of timber, but illegal logging is a growing problem.
Courtesty of EIA

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 8:11 am

Forests cover about half of Russia's land mass, an environmental resource that President Vladimir Putin calls "the powerful green lungs of the planet."

But Putin himself acknowledges that Russia, the world's biggest exporter of logs, is having its timber stolen at an unprecedented rate.

The demand for high-value timber is fueling organized crime, government corruption and illegal logging in the Russian Far East. The hardwood cut in the endless forests often ends up as flooring and furniture in the United States, Europe, Japan and China.

Read more
The Salt
12:14 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Chocolate Fashions Make For A Truly Sweet Little Black Dress

Breakfast of chocolate at Tiffany's? Ten pounds of the dark, sweet stuff were used to craft this Audrey Hepburn-inspired dress and matching handbag, created by master chocolatier Mark Tilling of Squires Kitchen.
Photo: Paul Winch-Furness Courtesy of Salon du Chocolat

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:51 pm

If you find yourself sauntering down the runway wearing 40 pounds of chocolate, don't sweat it. Seriously — you might find yourself dripping on the audience.

So warns Fiona Bitmead, one of 10 models who showed off edible chocolate creations Friday night at the Salon du Chocolat in London. Five handlers helped her get dressed.

"[I] had to worry about a dress melting on me!" she says. "I can't say I've ever wanted to eat the dresses I've worn down the catwalk before."

Read more
The Two-Way
11:05 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Teacher Who Died Trying To End Shooting Remembered As A Hero

A Sparks Middle School student cries with family members after a fellow student killed a math teacher and himself Monday in Sparks, Nev.
Kevin Clifford AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:46 pm

Michael Landsberry, the 45-year-old middle school math teacher and Afghan War veteran who was killed Monday trying to talk down a student shooter at a Nevada middle school, is being remembered as a hero.

Witnesses at Sparks Middle School in the city of Sparks, near Reno, described how Landsberry approached the armed 13-year-old boy and tried to get him to surrender a semi-automatic pistol he had used to shoot two fellow students. The boy then turned the weapon on Landsberry, fatally shooting him, before using the pistol to take his own life.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:26 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Roma Couple Charged With Abducting Girl; Missing-Child Tips Pour In

A woman takes a call at the Greek charity The Smile of the Child, which is caring for a girl who police say was abducted by a Roma couple. Officials are trying to find her biological parents.
Thanassis Stavrakis AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:03 pm

Greek officials who are trying to determine the origin of a young blond girl found living in a Roma settlement last week have received thousands of calls since releasing her photo. Some callers offer information; others say the girl may be their child. The head of a charity that's now caring for the girl says about 10 missing-children cases are being reviewed.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:01 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Fewer Jobs Than Expected In Sept., But Jobless Rate Fell

People looking for work were filling out applications earlier this month at a career fair in Emeryville, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:20 pm

The nation's jobless rate ticked down to 7.2 percent in September from 7.3 percent in August, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Tuesday.

But just 148,000 were added to public and private payrolls. That's below the 180,000 economists expected. It's yet another sign that job growth remains soft.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:32 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Walk Or Run In The Rain? There's An Equation For That

Screen Shot YouTube/MinutePhysics

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:06 pm

Is it better to walk or run in the rain? MinutePhysics has the answer.


You can keep up with more of what Adam Frank is thinking on Facebook and on Twitter: @AdamFrank4

Read more
The Two-Way
8:19 am
Tue October 22, 2013

U.S. Drone Strikes Violate International Law, Reports Allege

Last month, protesters in Multan, Pakistan, expressed their anger about U.S. drone strikes.
S.S. Mirza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 12:07 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Philip Reeves discusses the Amnesty International report on U.S. drone strikes

Two reports released on the eve of a White House visit by Pakistan's prime minister allege that the U.S. has "violated international law with top-secret targeted-killing operations that claimed dozens of civilian lives in Yemen and Pakistan," as McClatchy Newspapers writes.

In one of the reports, Amnesty International says that:

Read more
The Two-Way
7:44 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Book News: U.S. Authors Face Hard Choice When Publishing In China

A woman walks past a display at a bookstore in Beijing.
AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:18 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Modest Job Growth, No Change In Unemployment Rate Expected

The scene earlier this month at a job fair in Sunrise, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:46 am

Update at 8:35 a.m. ET. The Report Is Out:

Fewer Jobs Than Expected In Sept., But Jobless Rate Fell

Our original post follows:

Read more
The Two-Way
6:44 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Trains Running Again In San Francisco As BART Strike Ends

Ready to go back into service: Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) train cars at a station in Oakland, Calif.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:39 am

Commuters in the San Francisco area should see things start returning to normal Tuesday, thanks to an overnight agreement that has ended a strike by workers at the transit system known as BART.

The walkout began Friday. Around 10:30 p.m. local time Monday (1:30 a.m. ET Tuesday), Bay Area Rapid Transit management and representatives of the workers' unions announced they had reached a deal.

Details of the agreement weren't released, but according to KQED:

Read more
Around the Nation
6:00 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Transit Strike Ends In San Francisco Bay Area

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the end of a transit strike in San Francisco.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: This is news from late last night. A deal was announced ending the four-day strike that had stranded 400,000 riders of Bay Area Rapid Transit, also known as BART. BART management called the deal a good one for union members while allowing for new infrastructure spending on the rail system in the future.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Sports
5:55 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Fake Jerseys Work In A Pinch For Bogota Soccer Team

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Walk around any city in Colombia and you'll find vendors selling counterfeit soccer jerseys. That came in handy for Bogota's Independiente Santa Fe team. They showed up for an away game in the wrong color, so a team official bought knockoffs from vendors.

Strange News
5:52 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Man Goes Deer Hunting In Wal-Mart Parking Lot

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

You how it is with deer hunting, you have to get the right gear. You think about the time and place. You might build a deer stand, a kind of treehouse to shoot from high ground. Or you can do like a man in Indiana, Pennsylvania. He spotted a deer in the Wal-Mart parking lot and he shot it right there. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review says he got six months' probation, even though it was, in all fairness, the first day of hunting season when he opened fire.

Around the Nation
5:35 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Seattle Suburb Considers Setting $15 'Living Wage'

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Minimum wage workers in a tiny suburb of Seattle may soon get a big pay raise - a big raise - if voters approve a controversial ballot initiative there next month.

NPR's Martin Kaste reports.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: This is SeaTac - it's a smallish suburb halfway between Seattle and Tacoma - hence the name - and the site of the international airport. Tucked behind the long-term parking lots is a low-rise apartment building that's home to some of the airport's workers.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOOR OPENING)

Read more

Pages