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5:42 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

At Global Gathering, Many Worry About U.S. Strength

The annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank began Thursday in Washington amid a partial government shutdown. Many delegates are concerned that the U.S. budget impasse may threaten global economic stability.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:19 am

When you invite guests over, you probably straighten up the house to make a good impression.

This week, the nation's capital is welcoming guests from all over the world. Thousands of finance ministers, central bankers, scholars and industry leaders are in Washington, D.C., for the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

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Sports
5:42 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Electric Football, Invented In 1948, Still Alive And Buzzing

Electric football survived the advent of Madden video games and today has a cult following.
Chris Benderev NPR

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:52 pm

Professional football is America's real pastime.

The 2013 Super Bowl was the third-most-watched piece of television in recorded history. The first- and second-most-watched? The previous two Super Bowls.

And buried deep down inside that avalanche of fandom are the people who still play a board game invented in 1948 called electric football.

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NPR Story
5:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Glee' Tribute To Cory Monteith Is Silent On Specifics Of Character's Death

There was a scarcely a dry eye when the hit show “Glee” paid tribute last night to one of its stars, Cory Monteith, who portrayed football player-turned-singer Finn Hudson.

Monteith died of a drug overdose in July. He was 31.

There had been a lot of speculation about how the show would explain his character’s death, but the program made no mention of how Finn died.

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NPR Story
5:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Elizabeth Graver's Novel Longlisted for National Book Award

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 10:00 am

The finalists for the National Book Award for fiction will be announced next week.

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NPR Story
5:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

China's Growing Influence In Former Soviet Republics

With China’s rapid rise as a global economic power, it’s become increasingly fashionable to talk about reviving the Old Silk Road: the interlocking series of routes — dating back to pre-Christian times — along which merchants, pilgrims and soldiers travelled from East to West.

The latest person to talk romantically that period is Chinese President Xi Jinping, during his first visit of neighboring Central Asian states in September.

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It's All Politics
5:26 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Takes A Toll On GOP In Virginia Governor's Race

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

With the government shutdown now in its 11th day, polls show that voters think Republicans bear the biggest share of the blame.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in Virginia — a state that's home to some 172,000 federal civilian workers and where federal spending is a big part of the economy. In the race to be Virginia's next governor, GOP candidate Ken Cuccinelli is falling in the polls.

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Around the Nation
5:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Billionaire's Gift Reopens Some Head Start Programs

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The government shutdown means that more than 9,000 children have been shut out of Head Start, which provides meals and preschool programs for low-income children. Last week, we heard from a regional director for Head Start in Alabama, Dora Jones. She told us she had to close programs serving 770 children in six counties.

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Code Switch
5:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Fetch Clay, Make Man': Ali, Fetchit And The 'Anchor Punch'

In 1965, Muhammad Ali and Lincoln Perry (Stepin Fetchit) teamed up in pursuit of a legendary boxing technique: the anchor punch.
Courtesy of New York Theatre Workshop

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

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Muhammad Ali's first title defense, a first-round TKO of Sonny Liston in 1965, propelled Ali to the status of icon. In Ali's training camp before the fight was an icon from an earlier era: Lincoln Perry. He was the first African-American movie star, who went by the stage name Stepin Fetchi. The relationship between the two men is the subject of an off-Broadway play called Fetch Clay, Make Man.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Peter Higgs Learned About His Nobel From A Former Neighbor

British physicist Peter Higgs.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:07 pm

The notoriously shy Peter Higgs learned that he had been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday from a former neighbor.

In a press conference on Friday, the British theoretical physicist said he had tried to skip town on Tuesday, but instead ended up at a restaurant to have beer and soup. The Nobel Prize Committee in Stockholm tried to call Higgs shortly before they made the announcement, but Higgs does not have a cellphone.

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Shots - Health News
4:50 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Why A Peanut Butter Test For Alzheimer's Might Be Too Simple

University of Florida researcher Jennifer Stamps administers the peanut butter sniff test to a volunteer.
Jesse S. Jones University of Florida

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:47 pm

Alzheimer's disease can be tough to diagnose, especially early on. Doctors can order brain scans and assay spinal fluids. But existing tests are imperfect and some can be invasive.

So you might understand the appeal of an alternative that researchers at the University of Florida in Gainesville tried. They had asked patients to sniff a dab of peanut butter during a routine test of cranial nerve function. Later, the team wondered if it could help them figure of it someone might be in the early stages of Alzheimer's.

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Education
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Pledge Of Allegiance Past Its Prime?

Millions of American school children begin the day with the pledge of allegiance. But do they, or their teachers, really understand what it means? Host Michel Martin discusses the issue with journalist Mary Plummer, of KPCC, and Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

Books
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Coming Clean' About Growing Up In A Hoarding Household

Kimberly Rae Miller grew up among piles of junk. Doors wouldn't close, stacks of paper turned to sludge, and the pool was filled with brown muck. Her father was a hoarder — in the most extreme kind of way. Host Michel Martin talks to Miller about how she coped, which is detailed in her memoir, Coming Clean. This segment initially aired July 29, 2013 on Tell Me More.

Politics
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

David Dinkins: Leading New York Is The 'Greatest Job There Is'

David Dinkins served as New York City's first African-American mayor. But his rise through the political ranks came with hard-learned lessons. Host Michel Martin speaks with former Mayor Dinkins about his book, A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic. This segment initially aired September 2, 2013 on Tell Me More.

The Salt
4:06 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

McDonald's President Was Caught Off Guard By Low-Wage, Single Mom

McDonald's USA President Jeff Stratton responds to an employee who burst into an event.
YouTube screengrab

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:11 pm

A video of a McDonald's worker confronting the president of the fast-food behemoth has gone viral this week, with the help of a fast-food workers' campaign aimed at raising hourly wages to $15.

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The Affordable Care Act, Explained
3:00 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

FAQ: Where Medicaid's Reach Has Expanded — And Where It Hasn't

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 4:23 pm

This is one of several explainers to help consumers navigate their health insurance choices under the Affordable Care Act, or as some call it, Obamacare. Click here for answers to other common questions. Have a question we missed? Send it to health@npr.org. We may use it in a future on-air or online segment.

Could I be eligible for Medicaid now?

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