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Health
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

A Father's Hunt For His Daughter's Genetic Defect

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Some people in life can see whole worlds in small things. Hugh Rienhoff can see it in a molecule called Transforming Growth Factor Beta-3. In 2003, his daughter Beatrice was born with a few noticeable abnormalities. Her eyes were spaced wider than usual, her leg muscles were weak, and she wouldn't gain weight. It resembled Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that can cause tears in the human heart, sometimes fatally.

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News
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Royal Baby Speculation Rages

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:36 am

Whether it's a boy or a girl, Kate Middleton and Prince William's baby, due to be born Saturday, will become third living heir to the British throne. Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks to Daily Mail columnist Robert Hardman about the royal baby.

Food
7:03 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Food In Science Fiction: In The Future, We Will All Eat Lasers

Ex-chef Jason Sheehan fears a robotic future without the humanity of food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 2:44 pm

Near the beginning of the Road Warrior there is a scene in which Mel Gibson's character eats dog food.

It is a perfect moment, a beautiful moment, a completely defining moment — a pause in the post-apocalyptic action where the writers gave us everything we needed to know about Gibson's Max Rockatansky in one, long, wordless scene. And it was a moment that — watching the movie at likely far too young an age on some long-gone Saturday night at the drive-in — messed me up for life.

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NPR Story
6:52 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Carnegie Hall Creates National Music Camp

The National Youth Orchestra — the very first American National Youth Orchestra — rehearses and performs this summer with conductor Valery Gergiev and and solo violinist Joshua Bell. It may be the best summer music camp ever — and it's free.

NPR Story
6:52 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Cabrera's Stunning Summer

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. I'm going to be on vacation for a couple of weeks and after today's show. You know what I'm going to miss? Our crew here and the chance to say: Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

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NPR Story
6:52 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Troubles Linger In 'Shadow Dancer'

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

"Shadow Dancer," is the name of the new film from James Marsh. The director won an Oscar for his 2008 documentary, "Man on a Wire," and his film, "Project Nim," was also a documentary winner at Sundance. But his latest is a fictional film based on very real events, the bloody civil war in Northern Ireland known as The Troubles. Pat Dowell has more.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
6:08 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Keeping Score: How To Understand Baseball

Mike Ehrmann Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 7:13 am

In Thursday's New York Times there's an article on keeping a score card by hand at baseball games. Who does it anymore? Fewer and fewer people, according to the article. Why bother when you can enjoy a live play-by-play on your handheld device? And if you insist on keeping score yourself, there are apps you can download that make it much easier than doing it by hand.

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:03 am
Sat July 13, 2013

'Why You? Why Now?' A Med Student's Journal

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 8:02 am

I guess doctors, especially doctors-in-training, have to get used to sudden, inexplicable endings. You are trained to heal. That's the goal, that's the point. But every so often, you don't win. Something you didn't see coming, comes. I don't know which hurts more, the 'suddenly' or the 'why?" If the patient is clearly dying, it's easier. You can prepare.

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Music Interviews
6:00 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Anna Von Hausswolff: An Artist In Thrall To A Mega-Instrument

Swedish musician Anna von Hausswolff says she was drawn to the church organ by its physicality: "When you play it, you can really feel it because you're sitting close to the pipes. It's almost as if you're becoming a part of the instrument."
Anders Nydam Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Swedish performer Anna von Hausswolff is one of the few recording artists in the world who plays the pipe organ in popular music. Her latest album, Ceremony, was recorded over five days at a church in her hometown of Gothenburg, Sweden.

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StoryCorps
5:52 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Brothers Lost On Deployment; Sister Mourns 'Soul Mates'

Monica Velez and her two brothers, Freddy (left) and Andrew, in 1996. Freddy died in Iraq in 2004, and Andrew died in Afghanistan in 2006.
Courtesy of Monica Velez

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Cpl. Jose "Freddy" Velez served in Iraq. His brother, Spc. Andrew Velez, deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Both died in their early 20s. They are survived by their sister, Monica.

"My mom left us when I was 7, so my dad was a single parent," Monica says. "And I did all the household chores. I got the boys dressed for school, I taught them how to ride their bike, I taught them how to read and write."

One of her favorite memories is when both brothers came back from basic training and told her she could no longer be bossy.

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Simon Says
5:47 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Retire The Phrase, 'This Wouldn't Be A Scandal In Europe'

Reporters swarm around former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer as he attempts to collect signatures for his run for New York City comptroller.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

I hope we've heard the last of people saying, "This would never be a scandal in Europe." They usually mean "sex scandal," and by now I think Americans are entitled to boast that we've become as blase about politicians with their pants down — or, in the case of Anthony Weiner, pec-flexing with his shirt off — as Europeans like to think they are.

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News
12:49 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Abortion Rights Activists Plan Challenge To Texas Measure

Abortion rights opponents, dressed in blue, and supporters, wearing orange, rally in the state Capitol rotunda Friday before the vote on a set of sweeping abortion restrictions.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:31 pm

In a major victory for the anti-abortion movement, the Texas state Senate passed a sweeping bill early Saturday that has become a flashpoint in the national abortion debate. Gov. Rick Perry is expected to sign it in short order.

But the fight is not over. Abortion rights supporters say that the new law attempts to overturn Roe vs. Wade in Texas, and that's why they plan to take their fight to the courts.

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The Salt
6:57 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Micro-Garden Madness: You Showed Us Your Stuff

Tomatoes and herbs grow in barrels in this urban micro-garden.
Nico Sanchez via Flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:30 am

Earlier this week, we told you about some of the people who are trying to make micro-gardening go big — by sharing their DIY tips and selling products designed to make gardening in a small space a piece of cake. Many readers of The Salt let us know they were all for it.

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The Two-Way
6:55 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

San Francisco Hospital Reports Third Death In Asiana Crash

A third death has been reported in the crash-landing of Asiana Airline flight 214, as San Francisco General Hospital said Friday that one of its patients who was injured in the accident has died. Hospital officials described the victim as a girl; they offered no further details about her.

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Movie Interviews
6:26 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Guillermo Del Toro, On Monsters And Meaning

A child of the '60s and '70s, Guadalajara-born director Guillermo del Toro has been a fan of the Japanese kaiju film tradition since he was a kid. His latest movie, Pacific Rim, is his passion project and homage to the genre.
Rafy Warner Bros. Pictures

From the audience-pleasing Hellboy to the critically acclaimed Pan's Labyrinth, Guillermo del Toro's movies are chock-full of mystical, often terrifying creatures. Now the Mexico-born director has made a big-budget entry in the genre that helped define his fascination with the monstrous: the Japanese kaiju films of the '60s.

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