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Parallels
1:05 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Brazilian Believers Of Hidden Religion Step Out Of Shadows

Men possessed by orixas dance before getting dressed in orixa costumes. They are participating in an Olubaje party, a Candomblé ritual for cleansing life of bad things and healing. The main god at the party is Omulu (the one with straws), known for healing diseases.
Marcello Vitorino Fullpress for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Amid chanting and drumming, a crowd gathers in Sao Paulo and waits for the gods to come to them from the spirit world.

They are celebrating a sacred festival day in honor of Omulu, a deity of life and death. The women wear white dresses with crinolines, colorful belts and headdresses. The men wear lace, pajama-style suits. They sing and dance in a circle for hours; the room gets warmer, the chanting more intense.

Suddenly, they are here: Orixas have possessed the chosen among the faithful. They are spirit gods, the deified ancestors who link humans to the other world.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Washington Navy Yard, Site Of Shooting, Has Long History

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth arrive at the Washington Navy Yard on June 9, 1939, to join President Franklin Roosevelt on a cruise down the Potomac River to Mount Vernon, Va.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:10 am

The sprawling Washington Navy Yard, scene of a deadly shooting Monday, is the Navy's oldest shore establishment and has long been considered the "ceremonial gateway" to the nation's capital.

The yard went into operation at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it employs thousands of people and is regarded as the "quarterdeck of the Navy" for its role as headquarters for the Naval District Washington.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

South Korean Soldiers Kill Man Trying To Cross To North

South Korean soldiers patrol along a military fence near the demilitarized zone dividing the two Koreas in the border city of Paju in April.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 3:29 pm

Thousands of North Korean defectors have made their way to the South, but it rarely goes in the opposite direction. So, news that South Korean troops at the border shot and killed a man trying to swim north across the Imjin River is unusual.

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Music Reviews
11:41 am
Mon September 16, 2013

The Masters At His Fingertips, Art Hodes Pays Tribute To Bessie Smith

Art Hodes performs at the Ole South in New York City circa 1946.
William Gottlieb Library of Congress via Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 1:38 pm

Jazz pianist Art Hodes, born in Russia in 1904, grew up near Chicago. His recording career really took off in the 1940s in New York, where he also hosted a radio show and wrote for the magazine The Jazz Record. Later, he moved back to Chicago and the atmosphere that nurtured him.

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Around the Nation
10:57 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Several Reported Dead In Shooting At Navy Yard In Washington

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We will go to NPR's business news in a moment. Right now, let's get an update on what we do know about a shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. today. We have to begin by being frank. What we do not know exceeds what we do. NPR's Jennifer Ludden is on the scene of that shooting today - or near it - and she's on line. And Jennifer, what have you been learning?

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Digital Life
10:51 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Are Latinos Turning Away From Traditional Media For Information?

NPR

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:43 pm

NPR's Tell Me More with Michel Martin hosted a Google+ Hangout on air, focusing on "Emerging Latinos and Innovations."

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Monkey See
10:44 am
Mon September 16, 2013

'Breaking Bad' Presents 'Ozymandias,' The Great And Terrible

Bryan Cranston as Walter White on AMC's Breaking Bad.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

[This post describes in detail plot points up to and including Sunday night's episode of Breaking Bad.]

We need to talk for a minute about evil.

There are those who don't really believe in evil, who believe that anyone who cannot be redeemed is more ill and broken than infected with wickedness and viciousness and brutality.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Former U.N. Inspector: Syria Plan 'Optimistic,' Requires Troops

Secretary of State John Kerry discusses the U.S.-Russia plan to eliminate Syria's chemical weapons with top British diplomat William Hague (left) and French diplomat Laurent Fabius, on Monday. Former weapons inspector David Kay says the plan includes "unrealistic" deadlines.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:26 am

The U.S.-Russia plan to rid Syria of chemical weapons by next summer faces many hurdles and includes "unrealistic" deadlines, says former U.N. weapons inspector David Kay, who worked on efforts to detail chemical weapons in Iraq.

Kay says the plan will require an international military presence — "boots on the ground" — to make sure the weapons don't fall into the wrong hands.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:29 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Can Faith Ever Be Rational?

Boyer d'Agen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 3:23 pm

Some people have faith that their spouse won't cheat on them. Some have faith that things happen for a reason. Some have faith in God.

Is there a common commitment underlying these disparate declarations of faith? And can such faith ever be rational?

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The Two-Way
9:02 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Attack At The Navy Yard: Gunman And 12 Victims Killed

Workers emerge from a building after a deadly shooting at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday. There are multiple injuries and deaths, and one gunman is dead. Police say they are searching for two other "potential" shooters.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:31 pm

(We're constantly updating the top of this post and adding to it below as well.)

The nation's capital went on high alert Monday after a shooting attack at the city's U.S. Navy Yard left at least 12 victims and one gunman dead and injured 8 others.

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The Two-Way
8:48 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Homeless Man With 'Great Heart' Finds $42,000, Turns It In

A homeless man turned in a backpack stuffed with cash and travelers checks to Boston police. A passport that was with the bag helped police find the person it belonged to.
Boston Police

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:30 am

"A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a 'great heart,' " The Boston Herald reports.

The Herald adds that:

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Mon September 16, 2013

How To Watch As The Costa Concordia Is (Hopefully) Righted

The view Monday from shore as work began to pull the Costa Concordia upright. The box-like structure on the ship's port side is one of the refloating caissons that will stabilize the ship.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:38 am

  • NPR's Sylvia Poggioli on the salvaging of the Costa Concordia

The effort to shift the luxury cruise ship Consta Concordia into an upright position has begun, and several news outlets are streaming their coverage of what's said to be the biggest such operation of its kind ever.

Reuters is one good option. It has embedded its video feed in its live blogging of the operation.

The BBC's webcast, meanwhile, has the advantage of allowing you to mute the sound.

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Book News: Man Booker Prize To Be Opened To Americans

British authors such as Hilary Mantel will soon have some competition from across the pond, according to organizers of the Man Booker Prize.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:11 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
7:09 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Mansfield Waits 121 Years For 2nd Night Game

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

In 1892, Mansfield University held the first night football game. Brand-new electric lights illuminated the field, just not very well. Squinting in the darkness, players tackled their own teammates and even the ref. Mansfield abandoned night games until this past Saturday, then the Pennsylvania school defeated Princeton. The athletic director says the 121-year pause between night games allowed time to work out the bugs.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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