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The Two-Way
7:13 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Navy Yard Shootings: No Second Gunman; Victims' IDs Emerge

At the White House and around the nation, flags are flying at half-staff since Monday's mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard.
Olivier Douliery UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 4:18 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Brian Naylor on the Navy Yard shootings
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Hansi Lo Wang on the victims

Our coverage continues of Monday's shootings at the Washington Navy Yard. Twelve victims and the man who authorities say gunned them down are dead.

Some of the latest developments:

-- Investigators now do not think there was a second shooter, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said late Monday evening. Throughout Monday, authorities had run down witness reports and other evidence indicating there might have been additional gunmen.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Book News: Fight Over Philosopher Ends With Gunfire In Russia

An artist's rendering of German philosopher Immanuel Kant.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
7:01 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Hawaiian Woman Complains Her Long Name Was Cut Off On IDs

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with an update on a Hawaiian woman with a very long name - Janice Lokelani Keihanaikukauakahihuliheekahaunaele. She goes by Loke, but Honolulu's KHOM2 reported on her complaint that her name was cut off on ID cards, which led to issues with travel and cops.

Now, Hawaii will expand its limit on the length of names on IDs so Loke won't need to use her maiden name - Worth.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Employee Gives School Principal Pot As A Gift

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The head of a Rhode Island school was named Providence Principal of the Year, but that was only the start of the accolades. Police say an employee, Christopher Michael Sheehan, gave his boss a present to celebrate - a half ounce of marijuana. Mr. Sheehan was arrested. Just to be clear, since it can apparently be easy to forget, Rhode Island is not one of the states that has legalized pot, and especially not in a school zone.

Around the Nation
6:41 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Victims Of Navy Yard Shooting Are Being Identified

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the shooter is known to have been, as we've just reported, a former Navy reservist. But DC's police chief did say yesterday that no active duty servicemembers were killed, no one in uniform. The dead included contractors and civilians, apparently. And to learn more now about those victims of yesterday's shooting, we turn to NPR's Hansi Lo Wang.

And what are you hearing from the people for whom this is a personal tragedy - that is, those who knew one or more of these victims?

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Around the Nation
5:46 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Navy Yard Shooting Deadliest Rampage Since Fort Hood

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's walk through yesterday's events at the Washington, D.C. Navy Yard. Investigators often begin their reconstruction of a mass shooting with a timeline.

INSKEEP: That timeline may change as they learn more. So what follows is the best information we have available now.

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Around the Nation
5:43 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Probing Ties Between Mexican Cartel And Chicago's Violence

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Five hundred and six people were murdered in Chicago last year. It was the kind of news that got John Lippert thinking.

JOHN LIPPERT: I live in Chicago and a lot of what we get is overnight stories saying, you know, three people shot, six people shot, day after day. And I just felt like, okay, well, what does it mean? Where are we going with this?

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Analysis
5:39 am
Tue September 17, 2013

U.N. Report Doesn't Assign Blame To Syrian Chemical Attack

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. A report by United Nations' chemical weapons inspectors does not blame Syria's government for last month's chemical weapons attack. The inspectors were not authorized to do that. But they did provide substantial evidence, the most detailed look available, of an August 21 attack that led the United States to threaten military action.

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The Salt
5:38 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Kitchen Time Machine: A Culinary Romp Through Soviet History

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

The French novelist Marcel Proust immortalized the connection between food and memory when the narrator of his novel Remembrances of Things Past bit into a madeleine and was transported to thoughts of his childhood.

But what if that madeleine were poisoned, so to speak?

That is the question underlying Russian American writer Anya von Bremzen's new memoir, Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking. Though it contains recipes, this is not a cookbook but rather, a history of a family and of Soviet Russia.

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Shots - Health News
5:37 am
Tue September 17, 2013

For-Profit Online Insurance Brokers Gear Up To Sell Obamacare

Workers at the eHealth call center outside Sacramento, Calif., get ready to sell health insurance through the marketplaces created under the federal health care law. Sales start Oct. 1.
eHealth Inc.

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:34 am

When the Affordable Care Act was working its way through Congress, Gary Lauer was nervous. Part of the bill sounded grim. It said people could buy required health coverage online, but only through websites run by state and federal governments.

"That was going to pretty much delete us from the landscape," he says.

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Politics
5:36 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Financial Crisis Recovery Has Been Bumpy For Some

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama says the nation does not want to watch another game of chicken in Washington, D.C. this fall, and he's warning congressional Republicans not to force his hand. Congress must, once again, raise the debt ceiling, or the federal government won't be able to pay all of its bills. Mr. Obama told GOP lawmakers yesterday they should lift that limit on borrowing, without trying to extract concessions from him.

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Around the Nation
5:36 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Washington, D.C. Copes With Navy Yard Tragedy

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:12 am

The deadly shooting rampage at the Navy Yard on Monday happened less than four miles from the White House and two miles from the Capitol. "This is a horrific tragedy," Mayor Vincent Gray said.

Around the Nation
5:36 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Floods Make Many Roads In Colorado Impassable

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Americans settled Western Colorado one canyon at a time. Rivers and streams were the original highways. Roads, when they came, followed rivers, often on narrow shelves of rock at the foot of canyon walls. And when floods hit Colorado, many roads washed away. In recent days, Colorado resident Mark Benjamin has helped to build a zip line to get supplies to neighbors cut off by flooding.

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Around the Nation
5:36 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Rain Stops In Colorado But Devastation Remains

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The heavy rain has finally stopped in Colorado, but days of flooding have devastated the most populated region of the state, known as the Front Range. As of this morning, we know that eight people have died, though hundreds have not been heard from, some in very remote areas. Officials estimate 1,500 homes have been destroyed, and thousands more damaged. Grace Hood from member station KUMC reports federal aid is making its way into the state, even as crews assess the damage.

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