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Shots - Health News
8:02 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Deadly Amoeba Found For First Time In Municipal Water Supply

Kali Hardig, 12, was released from a hospital in Little Rock, Ark., on Sept. 11 after surviving a brain infection caused by amoebas.
Danny Johnston Associated Press

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 10:32 am

A 4-year-old child who died of a rare brain infection in early August has led Louisiana health officials to discover that the cause is lurking in the water pipes of St. Bernard Parish, southeast of New Orleans.

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Around the Nation
7:51 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Colorado Flooding Forces Thousands From Homes

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It is being called an historic search and rescue operation. Authorities in Colorado say well over a thousand people have been rescued by helicopter from mountain areas ravaged by floods. Some parts of the state have received 14 inches of rain since a storm began pounding the region Wednesday night. At least four people have been reported killing in the storms. NPR's Kirk Siegler has more.

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Code Switch
7:51 am
Sun September 15, 2013

50 Years After The Bombing, Birmingham Still Subtly Divided

Investigators work outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., following an explosion that killed four young girls. Three Ku Klux Klansmen were convicted in the bombing years later.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 1:18 pm

Fifty years ago Sunday, a Ku Klux Klan bomb at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Ala., killed four black girls and sent shock waves throughout the country.

In Birmingham, the tragedy laid bare a deep rift.

Carolyn McKinstry, standing on the sidewalk outside 16th Street Baptist Church, remembers arriving for worship 50 years ago.

"It was Youth Day," she says. "We were excited because that meant we got to do everything. We sang, we ushered, we did everything."

Some of her Sunday school classmates had gone to the ladies' room to freshen up.

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The Sunday Conversation
5:39 am
Sun September 15, 2013

Compensation Funds For Victims Of Tragedy A 'Small Solace'

Kenneth Feinberg speaks at a press conference on the One Fund, established for victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

In so many American tragedies, from the attacks of Sept. 11 to the Boston Marathon bombings, victims who survive and the families of those who don't are offered compensation. And when it comes time to figure out who should be compensated and how much, time and time again, Kenneth Feinberg's phone rings.

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Television
5:15 am
Sun September 15, 2013

The Voice Of Rocky And Natasha Earns An Emmy

Voice actress June Foray will receive the Governor's Award at the Creative Arts Emmys.
Amanda Edwards UCLA/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show featured a fearless flying squirrel and his slow-witted moose sidekick. They did battle with two scheming but incompetent Soviet spies named Boris and Natasha.

The cartoon is an American classic, beloved for a wry sense of humor that appeals to kids and their parents. It originally aired from 1959 until 1964, but has been in syndication ever since, most recently on the Cartoon Network and Boomerang.

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The U.S. Response To Syria
6:15 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Breaking Down Chemical Weapons, One Fact At A Time

A U.S. Marine carries a light flame-thrower while wearing experimental clothing designed to protect against atomic, biological and chemical warfare in 1960.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 8:00 pm

Saturday, the U.S. and Russia announced an agreement on the destruction of Syria's chemical weapons. The country has a week to detail its chemical arsenal and has until the middle of 2014 to destroy its stockpile. The State Department has published a framework for the plan.

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Author Interviews
5:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

'The Witness Wore Red': A Polygamist's Wife Finds A New Life

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

In 2007, a breakaway extremist offshoot of the Mormon Church called the Fundamentalist Church of the Latter Day Saints made national news. Police raided an FLDS compound in Texas where they found hundreds of women and girls. The church's leader, Warren Jeffs, was sentenced to life plus 20 years behind bars for sexually assaulting children.

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Animals
5:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

In France's Camargue, Bulls Are A Passion And A Way Of Life

The black, long-horned Camargue bull is just one of two breeds of fighting bulls in Europe. The bulls are shown here at the Roman arena in Arles, southern France.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 8:00 pm

Amid streaks of lightning and startling thunder claps on a recent day, I head out into the middle of the marshy wetlands known as the Camargue. I'm with a group of tourists, piled on hay bales in the back of a flatbed trailer pulled by a massive tractor.

The delta in southern France where two branches of the Rhone River meet the sea, the Camargue is the biggest Mediterranean delta after the Nile. The stunning ecosystem is home to pink flamingos, rice paddies and salt, which has been harvested here since the Middle Ages.

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All Tech Considered
5:47 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Musical Robots Take The Stage For Harmony, Not Domination

Stickboy, Compressorhead's four-armed drummer rocks out in front of thousands of fans at the Big Day Out music festival.
Shar Try ekto23

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 5:38 pm

Robots aren't taking over the planet yet, but they are doing jobs in more and more places: hospitals and offices, movie sets and battlefields. They're making a mark in the world of music, as well.

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NPR Story
5:32 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

New York Underground: Exploring City Caves And Catacombs

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

Urban explorer Steve Duncan goes underground, examining the hidden infrastructure of major cities all over the world: their tunnels, subways and sewers. Late in 2010, NPR's Jacki Lyden joined Duncan and a group of subterranean adventurers in New York. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Jan. 2, 2011.)

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NPR Story
5:32 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

For Rich NFL Players, Do Fines Matter?

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

The NFL has fined Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh $100,000 for an illegal low block behind an opponent's knee. Suh, twice voted the league's "dirtiest player" by fellow players in a Sporting News poll, is appealing the fine, the largest ever for on-the-field conduct. The question for Suh and fellow athletes is whether fines change behavior.

NPR Story
5:32 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

In Flooded Colorado, Rescue Amid The Rain

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

Hundreds of people have been evacuated from flooded areas of Colorado, which on Saturday saw a brief break in heavy rain. But with more rain in the forecast, lives and homes remain in danger.

The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Costa Concordia Salvage Operation To Begin Monday

Work at the wreckage of the Costa Concordia continues through the night Sept. 14, off the Italian island of Giglio. The Costa Concordia is due to be righted, in a project set to begin Monday.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:25 pm

A complicated salvage operation is set to begin Monday at the site of the Costa Concordia, the luxury cruise ship that ran aground off Italy in 2012. Even if it succeeds, it will be a long time before things return to normal on the island of Giglio, where the ship wrecked last January.

A large team has gathered to try to move the wreck of the ship, which measures 952 feet in length and weighs more than 114,000 tons. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
1:51 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Japan Uses Laptops, Cost-Cutting To Launch Rocket Into Space

Japan's new solid-fuel rocket lifts off from the launch pad at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Uchinoura Space Center in Kimotsuki, Kagoshima prefecture, on Japan's southern island of Kyushu Saturday.
Jiji Press AFP/Getty Images

Japan has sent a space telescope into orbit, as its new Epsilon rocket delivered its payload Saturday. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency says the successful launch is a step toward its goal "to lower hurdles to space" by simplifying rocket launches and making them more affordable. The launch was reportedly done via laptop.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Sat September 14, 2013

Bookless Public Library Opens In Texas

An artist's rendering shows computer stations at the new BiblioTech bookless public library in Bexar County, Texas. The library is holding its grand opening Saturday.
Courtesy of Bexar County

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 6:02 pm

An all-digital public library is opening today, as officials in Bexar County, Texas, celebrate the opening of the BiblioTech library. The facility offers about 10,000 free e-books for the 1.7 million residents of the county, which includes San Antonio.

On its website, the Bexar County BiblioTech library explains how its patrons can access free eBooks and audio books. To read an eBook on their own device, users must have the 3M Cloud Library app, which they can link to their library card.

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