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The Two-Way
3:57 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Bill Gates, Warren Buffett Again Top Forbes 400

Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle, is No. 3 on the Forbes 400 list of the wealthiest Americans.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 4:46 pm

It's mostly the usual suspects on the latest Forbes 400 list of the wealthiest Americans: Bill Gates tops the list for the 20th consecutive year, with a net worth of $72 billion, followed by investor Warren Buffett and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison.

The Koch brothers, Charles and David, tie for fourth place, while Walton family members with an interest in retail behemoth Wal-Mart occupy positions 6 through 9.

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The Salt
3:29 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Atkins Hopes To Ride Paleo, Low-Carb Craze To A Comeback

A Beef Merlot dinner from the Atkins frozen food line, launched in January.
Kent Altena Flickr

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 5:39 pm

A decade ago, Atkins was undeniably the fad diet of the moment: Back then, nearly 10 percent of Americans said they were either on the low-carb weight-loss plan or had tried it.

But after Dr. Robert Atkins, its namesake and mastermind, died of a head injury in 2003, the brand went downhill fast. Nutritionists berated the plan for promoting saturated fats and cholesterol-rich foods. Sales of Atkins books and food products dropped precipitously. And Atkins Nutritionals filed for bankruptcy in 2005.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Both Mexican Coasts Are Lashed By Deadly Tropical Cyclones

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 6:06 pm

Tropical Storm Manuel and Hurricane Ingrid made landfall within hours of each other on Mexico's two coasts, leaving at least 21 people dead.

The Washington Post reports:

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The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

'A Sense Of Panic,' Says Witness To Navy Yard Shooting

People exited a building with their hands up after a shooting Monday at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:17 am

For some employees at the Washington Navy Yard, the first sign that something was wrong came when a fire alarm went off early Monday morning.

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Shots - Health News
2:28 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Teens Curb Sodas And TV, But More Work Needed In Obesity Fight

Teenagers put in more than two hours a day of TV time on average, still more than what pediatricians say is healthy.
iStockphoto.com

In the past few years a wisp of a trend has emerged suggesting that the huge rise in obesity among children and teenagers may have peaked.

Here's one more bit of evidence: Teenagers are cutting back on sugary drinks, getting more exercise and watching less TV. But overall they're still pretty awesomely bad when it comes to healthful behaviors, a study finds.

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The Two-Way
1:40 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

With Summers Out, Will Obama Turn To Yellen For Fed Post?

Federal Reserve Board Vice Chairman Janet Yellen is considered a top candidate to replace Ben Bernanke now that Lawrence Summers has withdrawn his name for contention for the Fed's top job.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

Financial markets rallied Monday, a day after Lawrence Summers took himself out of the running to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve. Summers had been seen as a front-runner to replace Ben Bernanke, whose term expires in January.

His exit improved the odds for his chief rival for the position — Fed Vice Chairman Janet Yellen — as well as those of Donald Kohn, the former vice chairman of the Fed board.

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History
1:39 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Birmingham Bombing: 50 Years Later, A Different America?

It's been half a century since the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed. The blast killed four little girls and was a turning point in the civil rights movement. Host Michel Martin revisits that era with historian Taylor Branch.

Around the Nation
1:39 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Ray Suarez On Latino Americans: Past Is Prologue?

Over 50 million Latin Americans live in the United States. Host Michel Martin speaks with veteran reporter Ray Suarez about his new book Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped A Nation.

Education
1:39 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Understanding The Wild Child, Or 'Nonconformist' Kid

We all knew the "wild child" in school, the one who couldn't sit still during story time, or raise her hand to speak in class. Elizabeth Weil has written a piece for the New Republic, asking if it's the child's fault, or the education system's. She talks with host Michel Martin.

Author Interviews
1:38 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Barnard President: Today's 'Wonder Women' Must Reframe Feminism

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 4:06 pm

There was a time when Debora Spar was used to being the only woman in the room. As a professor at Harvard Business School, she was surrounded by what she describes as "alpha men of the academic sort — men with big egos and big attitudes and an awful lot of testosterone."

Then, in 2008, she found herself in the opposite situation: She became the president of Barnard College, the women's college affiliated with Columbia University, where "there was barely a male in sight."

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Book Reviews
1:38 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Introducing 'Miss Anne,' The White Women Of A Black Renaissance

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:16 pm

Ten years ago, literary scholar Carla Kaplan released an acclaimed edition of the letters of Zora Neale Hurston. In the course of researching Hurston's life, Kaplan became curious about the white women who were in Harlem in the same period as Hurston, women who risked family exile and social ostracism to be part of the artistic and political movements of the Harlem Renaissance. Now, Kaplan has published a cultural history of those women called Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance.

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The Salt
1:36 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Steak, Egg & Cheese McMuffin

"Artist's" rendering.
NPR

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:41 pm

For the first two millennia of McDonald's Breakfast Menu, very little changed, but the past several months have brought startling reforms. The company introduced the Egg White Delight McMuffin, which has 50 fewer calories and one fewer yellow spot than the regular McMuffin. They stopped slapping you in the face when you try to order the Fruit 'N Yogurt Parfait. And now, they bring us the Steak, Egg & Cheese McMuffin.

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The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Sarin Attack On Syrian Civilians Is A 'War Crime,' U.N. Says

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who received the report on Syria's chemical weapons over the weekend from professor Ake Sellstrom, expressed his "profound shock and regret" at its findings.
Paulo Filgueiras UN Photo

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:09 am

Chemical weapons were used in Syria "on a relatively large scale" on Aug. 21, says U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who issued a report by U.N. inspectors Monday. The attack killed civilians, "including many children," and constitutes a "war crime," Ban wrote. He expressed his "profound shock and regret" at the findings.

Ban received the report over the weekend from professor Ake Sellstrom of Sweden, who headed the inspection team in the incident that took place near Damascus. The secretary-general briefed the Security Council on the report earlier Monday.

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Parallels
1:05 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Brazilian Believers Of Hidden Religion Step Out Of Shadows

Men possessed by orixas dance before getting dressed in orixa costumes. They are participating in an Olubaje party, a Candomblé ritual for cleansing life of bad things and healing. The main god at the party is Omulu (the one with straws), known for healing diseases.
Marcello Vitorino Fullpress for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Amid chanting and drumming, a crowd gathers in Sao Paulo and waits for the gods to come to them from the spirit world.

They are celebrating a sacred festival day in honor of Omulu, a deity of life and death. The women wear white dresses with crinolines, colorful belts and headdresses. The men wear lace, pajama-style suits. They sing and dance in a circle for hours; the room gets warmer, the chanting more intense.

Suddenly, they are here: Orixas have possessed the chosen among the faithful. They are spirit gods, the deified ancestors who link humans to the other world.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Washington Navy Yard, Site Of Shooting, Has Long History

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth arrive at the Washington Navy Yard on June 9, 1939, to join President Franklin Roosevelt on a cruise down the Potomac River to Mount Vernon, Va.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:10 am

The sprawling Washington Navy Yard, scene of a deadly shooting Monday, is the Navy's oldest shore establishment and has long been considered the "ceremonial gateway" to the nation's capital.

The yard went into operation at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it employs thousands of people and is regarded as the "quarterdeck of the Navy" for its role as headquarters for the Naval District Washington.

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