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3:32 am
Wed August 28, 2013

New Accessible Playground Rules May Not Go Far Enough

The local playground's design doesn't work for Emmanuel, shown here with his family. The loose surface hampers his wheelchair, and there are no ramps to help him get onto the play structures.
Julie Caine for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:57 pm

Last year, the federal government made accessibility standards at playgrounds mandatory under the Americans with Disabilities Act so that children with disabilities can more easily play alongside typical kids.

But whether children with disabilities are able to enjoy their new civil rights to play may depend on where they live, and the design decisions their cities and towns made when they built local playgrounds.

For 3-year-old Emmanuel Soto, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, the local playground's design doesn't work.

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Around the Nation
3:00 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Woman Recovers After Getting Shot Shielding Neighbor's Kids

Carmesha Rogers snuggles with her 4-year-old daughter, Kasharee, on Aug. 22, in Muskegon, Mich. Rogers sustained a gunshot wound to the head on July 9 after removing several neighborhood children from a gunbattle's line of fire. Rogers says her only thought was: "Just get the kids out the way. 'Cause I'd want someone to do that for my kids."
Natalie Kolb Mlive.com/Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Last month, a disagreement on a residential street in Muskegon, Mich., turned into a deadly gun battle. Six men were armed, one man was killed, and dozens of shots sprayed in all directions.

At the house directly behind the gunfight, three children were playing on the porch.

This scenario is not as rare in America as we'd like to think. But what happened next is: As the bullets zipped past the children, one woman ran into the line of fire to try to save them.

'Basically A War Zone'

It wasn't quite yet dinnertime.

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Business
2:53 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Mayer Shines At Yahoo After Spotlight Dimmed At Google

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Yahoo yesterday announced a redesign of some of its major sites, the latest step in CEO Marissa Mayer's dramatic turnaround of the company. Since she took the helm last year, Yahoo's stock has surged. And a leading industry measure recently showed Yahoo topping Google in the number of website visits - which is something, since Marissa Mayer jumped to Yahoo after years of being a top player at Google.

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The March On Washington At 50
11:54 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

50 Years After March On Washington, John Lewis Still Fights

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., speaks Saturday at the Lincoln Memorial during activities to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.
Michael Reynolds EPA /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Fifty years ago Wednesday, John Lewis was the youngest speaker to address the estimated quarter-million people at the March on Washington.

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The Two-Way
7:17 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Scientists Say They've Confirmed A New Element

The periodic table.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:24 pm

Scientists in Sweden say they have confirmed a new, super-heavy element that was first proposed by Russian scientists in 2004. The element with the atomic number 115 has yet to be named.

In a press release, Lund University says a group of international scientists led by physicists from Lund University, made the element by shooting a beam of calcium, which has 20 protons, into a thin film of americium, which has 95 protons.

For less than a second, the new element had 115 protons.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming Faces Lingering Doubts Over Sexual Abuse

Attorney Robert Allard, seen here with former swimmer Jancy Thompson in 2010, says USA Swimming still needs to improve its handling of sexual abuse claims. The organization is also facing congressional scrutiny.
Ben Margot AP

There's concern the sport of swimming still may be dealing with a sexual abuse problem in the United States.

It's been three years since revelations emerged in the media. A number of in-depth reports in 2010 likened the situation in swimming to the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: Coaches molesting under-age female swimmers; some of the abuse continuing for years without punishment.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Vaccinating Babies For Rotavirus Protects The Whole Family

An artistic illustration of the rotavirus.
petersimoncik iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:40 pm

A 7-year-old vaccine that has drastically cut intestinal infections in infants is benefiting the rest of America, too.

A study published Tuesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that vaccinating infants against rotavirus has also caused a striking decline in serious infections among older children and adults who didn't get vaccinated.

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Energy
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Vt. Nuclear Plant Shutdown A Sign Of Changing Energy Market

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

After years of litigation and political jousting, Vermont is set to close its only nuclear power plant by the end of next year. As John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports, the plant's closure is a sign of how much the country's energy market is changing.

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Miami's Decrepit Sewage System In Desperate Need Of Repair

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Fighting Rim Fire A Balancing Act As It Grows On Two Sides

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The massive wildfire burning near and in Yosemite National Park is still growing. It has now charred more than 180,000 acres of scenic forest, which makes it one of the largest in California history. At this point, it is still only 20 percent contained. Thousands of firefighters are working hard to improve that number and corral the flames. But as NPR's Nathan Rott reports, this is no ordinary fire.

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Schools Canceled As Heat Wave Sweeps Through Midwest

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:49 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A late summer heat wave has much of the Midwest broiling. Temperatures today soared into the 90s in Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa, Illinois, as well as other states. And the heat forced some schools that are more accustomed to closing for snow days, to call off classes because of the heat.

From sweltering Chicago, NPR's David Schaper reports.

DAVID SCHAPER, BYLINE: Riding up the elevator to the fourth floor of Chicago's Josephinum Academy with school president Michael Dougherty, you can just feel the air get hotter and thicker.

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Science
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Sophisticated Prosthetics Help Liberate Disabled Adventurers

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A story now about technology and the creative ways it's being used to help people with disabilities enjoy the great outdoors - skiing, biking, even whitewater rafting, as Colorado Public Radio's Eric Whitney reports.

ERIC WHITNEY, BYLINE: In the equipment room at Telluride Adaptive Sports in Colorado, it's all about what works.

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World
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

U.N. Security Council Not Expected To Approve Syria Strike

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A strike against Syria will almost certainly fail to win the support of the U.N. Security Council. That is because of Russian opposition, and the Chinese also oppose it. Why are the Russians so determined in their support of the Syrian regime despite Western claims that Bashar al-Assad's army has committed an atrocious war crime?

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

For Some Kids, Summer Camp Includes Seeing Dad In Prison

In the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars program, kids can bond with their fathers while staying at a campground near prison. Geray Williams, an inmate at the North Branch Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Md., gets a hug from his son Sanchez during the weeklong camp in 2010.
Timothy Jacobsen AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:57 pm

The idea of taking a child to prison for a week may bring to mind visions of "Scared Straight" programs. But the Father to Child Summer Camp Behind Bars does just that — and the goal is to let kids bond with their fathers, who might be incarcerated far from their families.

The unique summer camp lodges children at a campground near prisons in Maryland and North Carolina, according to Here & Now, the show from WBUR and NPR. The kids visit their fathers in prison each day.

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Music Reviews
4:51 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Sam Baker's 'Say Grace' Is At Once Beautiful And Broken

Sam Baker's Say Grace is his fourth album since he started making them in 2004, at age 50.
Chrislyn Lawrence Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Sam Baker has a backstory that must be told. In 1986, at age 31, he was traveling by train in Peru when a bomb from the terrorist group Shining Path exploded right next to him. The little girl he'd been talking to was killed along with half a dozen others, and his own injuries required 18 operations. His mangled left hand was rebuilt; work on his ears left him with a loud ringing that never stops, though Baker says he's made his peace with it.

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